Centre for Research in Young People's Texts and Cultures

News

News Flashes - Listing All News Items

CRYTC Faculty and Affiliate Receive ChLA Awards

March 28, 2017

The Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures would like to congratulate Mavis Reimer and Clare Bradford on receiving 2017 Children’s Literature Association book awards.

CRYTC affiliate Clare Bradford received the ChLA Book Award for The Middle Ages in Children’s Literature (Palgrave, 2015), and she and Mavis Reimer received the Honor Edited Book Award for Girls, Texts, Cultures (Wilfrid Laurier UP, 2014). Girls, Texts, Cultures is a volume initiated by a symposium hosted by CRYTC in 2010.

The ChLA Book Award is awarded annually by the Children’s Literature Association to recognize outstanding book-length contributions to children’s literature history, scholarship, and criticism. The ChLA Edited Book Award and Honors recognize essay collections that make a distinct or significant contribution to our understanding of youth literature from a literary, cultural, historical or theoretical perspective.

More details about 2017 ChLA award winners can be found on the ChLA website.

The Maurice Sendak Exhibition in CRYTC

March 15, 2017

From March 22 to April 10, 2017, the Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures will be hosting The Maurice Sendak Exhibition in Room 3C23B.

This exhibition is part of a free series of events organized by the University of Winnipeg’s English practicum class (ENGL-3120), and it will feature the Perry Nodelman Maurice Sendak Book Collection.

This exhibition acknowledges the support of the University of Winnipeg Experiential Learning Fund and the Experiential Learning Network; Professor Emeritus Perry Nodelman and the Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures; the UW library; the UW archives; and Dr. Naomi Hamer and the practicum course students in the Department of English (UW).

Katherena Vermette Public Reading

January 10, 2017

On March 8, 2017 at 12:30PM, University of Winnipeg’s Carol Shields Writer-in-Residence Katherena Vermette will be giving a free public reading in Room 1LO7.

A Métis writer from Treaty One territory, Katherena won the 2013 Governor General’s Literary Award for Poetry for her first book, North End Love Songs. She is also the author of the children’s picture-book series The Seven Teachings Stories, and the novel The Break. Her short film documentary, This River, was released in 2016.

"WWI and the Homefront in the Italian Children’s Magazine Corriere dei Piccoli: Representations and Idealization of the Battlefront and Nationhood" by Dr. Fabiana Loparco

July 12, 2016

CRYTC is pleased to present a talk by visiting scholar Fabiana Loparco on July 28 from 12:30PM to 1:30PM in Room 2C16.

This presentation aims to explore the warring education of children in Italy during WWI on the pages of the most important Italian children’s magazine, the Corriere dei Piccoli. Analysing stories and comics published from 1914 to 1918, Dr. Loparco will examine the magazine’s educational messages, which instructed children about the values of sacrifice, duty, and homeland in order to build a “militarized childhood.” The patriotic representations in the Corriere dei Piccoli altered the ethical nature of the war. By ignoring the reality of battlefields, comics, on one hand, described WWI as a harmless, funny game, while tales, on the other hand, described the war as a “training of courage” and a “birthplace of heroes.” Dr. Loparco will also demonstrate that the particular interpretation of the conflict proposed by the Corriere had the intent of unifying the nation around common ideals that would have shaped and reinforced a national identity for the children of the young Italian kingdom.

Fabiana Loparco obtained her Ph.D. in History of Education at the University of Macerata (Italy) in 2015. Currently, she is a teaching assistant in the Italian Department of Dalarna University (Sweden). Her research focuses on the history of Italian and English children’s literature and children’s magazines in the 19th and 20th centuries, war propaganda in children’s magazines during WWI, the first Italian socialist magazines for children, primary school education under fascism, and the history of Italian teachers’ associations. She is the author of The Corriere dei Piccoli and World War I.

Call for Papers: IRSCL Congress 2017

February 22, 2016

The 23rd Biennial Congress of the International Research Society for Children’s Literature will be hosted by the Children’s Studies Program, Department of Humanities, Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, York University in Toronto, Canada.

Congress Co-Convenors
Cheryl Cowdy and Peter E. Cumming

Congress Dates
Saturday, July 29 to Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Congress Venue
Keele Campus, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The Children’s Studies Program is an Honours BA program with more than 500 majors and minors. York University is the third-largest university in Canada. Toronto is Canada’s largest city, the fourth-largest city in North America, and the leading Canadian destination for tourists. The economic, transportation, and cultural hub of Canada, with direct flights to many cities around the world, Toronto is one of the safest and most multicultural cities in the world.

Congress Theme
"Possible & Impossible Children: Intersections of Children’s Literature & Childhood Studies"

At least since Jacqueline Rose’s provocative argument about the "impossibility" of children’s fiction in 1984, children’s literature scholars have been profoundly anxious about "the child" and "children" in relation to children’s literature. Richard Flynn (1997), Mary Galbraith and Karen Coats (2001), Perry Nodelman (2008), David Rudd (2013), and Marah Gubar (2013) have variously noted the dangers, difficulties, necessities, and desirability of approaching children’s texts through conceptions of "children," "childhood," and "adulthood." Thus, this Congress is grounded in ongoing debates in children’s literature scholarship about possible relationships of “the child,” "children," and "childhood" to children’s literature; to what extent and in what ways such relationships are possible or "impossible"; and to what extent and in what ways these are necessary and/or desirable.

Over the past three decades, the multidisciplinary fields of children’s, childhood, and youth studies have developed dramatically. Childhood and youth studies, constantly negotiating intersections between actual young people and sociocultural constructions and representations of childhood and youth, offer compelling, if problematic, points of inquiry into the study of children’s literature, just as children’s and young adult literatures continue to challenge and inform childhood and youth studies.

Some Possible Congress Topics

The Congress 2017 theme lends itself to a variety of key issues related to production, interpretation, and reception of children’s and young adult texts from different historical periods; in diverse local, regional, national, and global contexts; inflected variously by differences in gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, and ability, including:

Production & Reception

  • innovative methodological approaches to children’s and young adult literatures, such as ethnographic and reader-reception studies
  • crossover literature and intergenerational reception
  • child and youth authorship, including juvenilia
  • adult-youth-child collaborations in children’s cultural productions, such as theatre for young audiences
  • children’s and young adult literatures and “affect”

Ethics & Rights

  • ethical issues in the production and reception of children’s and young adult literatures
  • children’s literature, social justice, and child and youth activism
  • children’s rights, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, and children’s literature

Representation & Ideology

  • gaps between children’s and youths’ lived experience and literary representations of children’s and youths’ lives
  • representations of children’s work and child labour
  • representations of child soldiers and children’s and youths’ experiences of war and violent conflicts
  • space and place in children’s and young adult literatures

Genres & Media

  • picture books, comic books, graphic novels, film, television, video games and children’s cultures
  • manipulable and interactive children’s literature: children’s literature as toys, dolls, stuffed animals, pop-up books, hypertexts, e-books, talking books
  • children, youth, and new media: remediation, transmediation, convergence culture, transliteracy, and multimedia children’s and youth texts

We invite proposals for papers to be presented in either of Canada’s official languages: English or French. Presented papers will be 20 minutes maximum. Suggestions for panels of 3-4 papers are also welcome.

Please submit an abstract of 250-500 words by November 15, 2016, as an e-mail attachment to irscl17@yorku.ca. In this attachment, include: the title and detailed proposal for your paper (to enable blind vetting of proposals, please do not include any identifying information in this document).

In a separate e-mail attachment please provide:

  • a short biography of 50-100 words that includes your name, institutional affiliation, e-mail address, and one or two recent publications
  • an indication of your audiovisual needs
  • an indication of whether you would be willing to chair a panel

"The Digital Blackfoot Storytelling Project: Methodological Approaches to Child-Centred, Community-Driven Research" by Dr. Erin Spring

January 28, 2016

The Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures is pleased to host "The Digital Blackfoot Storytelling Project: Methodological Approaches to Child-Centred, Community-Driven Research" a public lecture by Dr. Erin Spring on February 11 from 2:30PM to 3:30PM in Room 2D11.

The recently released Executive Summary of the Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada calls for the production of culturally appropriate and relevant environments as a means of promoting child welfare and resilience. In this talk, Dr. Spring will reflect on the early stages of an ongoing interdisciplinary project that brings together multiple researchers from the Institute for Child and Youth Studies at the University of Lethbridge, policy makers, and community members from a non-profit organization for urban Blackfoot children. Blackfoot youth are becoming para-ethnographers, collecting stories about their culture, history, and language from their Elders to upload into a digital library. This library will assist in the delivery of culturally relevant educational programming, while facilitating intergenerational knowledge transmission. Dr. Spring’s talk will explore the value of using digital methods, photo-elicitation, and child-centered action research to achieve the aim of producing an enduring, culturally-relevant resource for the youth. Specifically, she will reflect on the ways in which these methodological approaches are centering the children and community members as active participants in the research project.

Dr. Erin Spring is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Institute for Child and Youth Studies at the University of Lethbridge. She is currently conducting reader-response research with Blackfoot youth living on a reserve in Southern Alberta, which is funded through the International Board of Books for Young People’s Frances E. Russell Grant. She is also the project manager of the Digital Blackfoot Storytelling Project. Erin completed her PhD in Children’s Literature at the University of Cambridge.

Launch of Pīsim Finds Her Miskanow at O-Pipon-Na-Piwin Cree Nation

December 9, 2015

On December 7, 2015, the team that created Pīsim Finds Her Miskanow returned the book to its community O-Pipon-Na-Piwin Cree Nation at South Indian Lake in northern Manitoba. The launch was held at Oscar Blackburn School with an audience of students, teachers, Chief and council, and community members. The research team gave a classroom set of Pīsim Finds Her Miskanow, along with a Teachers Guide for the book, to Oscar Blackburn School. The community honoured the research team by distributing gifts to them. Author William Dumas made remarks, and the launch event was followed by a feast hosted by the community.

We acknowledge the support of the Marsha Hanen Global Dialogue and Ethics Award to make this launch possible.

Sutherland Prix 2016/Prix Sutherland 2016

November 30, 2015

Call for Submissions: Neil Sutherland Prize for the Best Scholarly Article published on the History of Children and Youth

Purpose: This award honours the pioneering work of Neil Sutherland in the history of children and youth by recognizing outstanding and innovative contributions to the field. The prize will be awarded by the History of Children and Youth Group in conjunction with the 2016 meeting of the Canadian Historical Association.

Eligibility: Articles published in English or French in scholarly journals and books between January 2014 and December 2015 will be eligible for consideration. There are no restrictions on time periods or national/international context. Award winners will demonstrate originality of scholarship and clear contribution to the study of the history of young people.

Submission of articles: Please submit a PDF copy of the published article by January 15, 2016 to Kristine Alexander, Co-Chair, History of Children and Youth Group (kristine.alexander@uleth.ca). Please write “Sutherland Prize” in the subject line of your email. Self-nominations welcome.

——————————————

Appel ŕ candidatures pour le Prix Neil Sutherland pour le meilleur article publié dans le domaine de l’histoire de l’enfance et de la jeunesse. Objectif: Le prix Neil-Sutherland en histoire de l’enfance et de la jeunesse, commémorant l’śuvre du professeur Neil Sutherland, vise ŕ récompenser le meilleur article paru dans ce domaine. Le prix sera décerné par Le Groupe d’histoire de l’enfance et de la jeunesse dans le cadre de la Réunion Annuelle 2016 de la Société Historique du Canada.

Conditions d’admissibilité: Des articles publiés en anglais ou en français dans des revues et des ouvrages scientifiques entre Janvier 2014 et Décembre 2015 seront admissibles aux fins d’examen. Il n’y a pas de restrictions quant aux périodes de temps ou quant au contexte (national / international). Les lauréats seront récompensés pour le caractčre innovant de leur recherche et pour leur contribution significative ŕ l’étude de l’histoire des jeunes.

Consignes de la mise en candidature: soumettre une copie PDF de l’article publié au plus tard le 15 janvier 2016 ŕ Kristine Alexander, Co-présidente, Groupe d’histoire de l’enfance et de la jeunesse (kristine.alexander@uleth.ca). Veuillez s.-v.-p. inscrire « Prix Sutherland » dans le titre de votre courriel. Possibilité de présenter sa propre candidature.

"An American Film Critic, a British intellectual, and a Peruvian Bear Walk into a Bar...: Civility and Conviviality in the Digital Age" by Dr. Daniel McNeil

November 5, 2015

On November 20 at 12:30PM in Room 2M70, Dr. Daniel McNeil (Associate Professor, History, Carleton University) is delivering a public talk entitled “An American Film Critic, a British intellectual, and a Peruvian Bear Walk into a Bar...: Civility and Conviviality in the Digital Age.” Dr. McNeil is a prominent historian and cultural theorist specializing in twentieth and twenty-first centuries cultural and intellectual history; Black Atlantic Studies; British Cultural Studies; Critical Race Studies and Sexuality; and Migration and Diaspora Studies.

His talk addresses the public intellectual work of notorious American film critic Armond White and celebrated British intellectual Paul Gilroy. In order to illuminate the idiosyncratic ways in which these writers both engage with intellectual work produced outside of academia, the talk will be interspersed with clips from the popular family film Paddington (2014). In doing so, it argues that the slyly subversive film updates the well-known stories of the beloved bear from "darkest Peru," which first appeared in print in 1958, in relation to post/colonial ideas about English politeness and Caribbean calypso – with the type of political intelligence and irony that has been demonstrated by Gilroy and White throughout their careers as cultural critics. The talk is moderated by Dr. Bruno Cornellier (English, University of Winnipeg). Everyone is welcome.

"Mediating Bodies: Representing Femininity in Contemporary Young People’s Fairy-Tale Adaptations": Emma Whatman Public Lecture

November 2, 2015

CRYTC is pleased to host "Mediating Bodies: Representing Femininity in Contemporary Young People’s Fairy-Tale Adaptations" a public lecture by Emma Whatman on November 18 from 12:30PM to 1:20PM in Room 3C30.

This talk examines fairy-tale adaptations for young people and investigates how medium, and medium-specific conventions impact on how female identities, bodies, and sexualities are represented in adaptations of "Snow White," "Sleeping Beauty," and "Cinderella" across a variety of media. For the purpose of this talk, Emma Whatman will speak to new media applications and comic books. She argues that new media applications that adapt fairy-tale princess narratives promote problematic gender and beauty ideologies for implied young female users. In contrast, the second part of this talk will address how the same fairy-tale narratives are adapted to the comic-book medium in DC Vertigo’s series Fairest. In particular, she investigates how females are represented and characterised in relation to toughness, sexualisation and postfeminist subjectivities. This presentation questions if through the comics medium these characters are able to have control and agency, or if they revert to being fetishized objects of the male gaze under the guise of postfeminism.

Emma Whatman is a PhD candidate and sessional tutor at Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia. Her research focuses on representations of female embodiment and subjectivity in contemporary fairy tale adaptations for young people across multiple media. She is currently a visiting scholar at the Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures at the University of Winnipeg where she is teaching a course around her research. She completed her BA (Hons) in 2012 and was awarded First Class Honours.

Fellowships to study at Kent State University’s Reinberger Children’s Library Center

October 23, 2015

Kent State University’s School of Library and Information Science is pleased to announce that we are now accepting applications for two $1,500 research fellowships:

The Jacqueline M. Albers Guest Scholar in Children’s Literature Fellowship was endowed by SLIS alumna Jacqueline M. Albers to support a guest scholar who will study children’s literature using the collections in the Reinberger Children’s Library Center.

The Kenneth and Sylvia Marantz Fellowship for Picturebook Research, supported by Dr. Kenneth and Sylvia Marantz, encourages scholarly research on the study of picture books using the resources of the Marantz Picturebook Collection for the Study of Picturebook Art.

If awarded, funds could be used to coordinate a research visit with attending the Marantz Picturebook Research Symposium, July 24-26, 2016.

Each fellowship provides a stipend of up to $1,500 for outstanding scholars to spend approximately one week on site, researching picture books, posters or ephemera related to picturebooks in the Reinberger Children’s Library Center and Marantz Picturebook Collection at the Kent State University School of Library and Information Science in Kent, Ohio, U.S.A. Stipends may be used toward travel, lodging, food and research-related supplies.

Mission of the Reinberger Children’s Library Center and the Marantz Picturebook Collection for the Study of Picturebook Art

From historical books for children to contemporary literature for young people, the Reinberger Children’s Library Center and the Marantz Picturebook Collection encompass diverse collections of youth literature that span geographic, cultural, physical, technological and temporal borders. The collections represent the best literature and related materials for young people. They also demonstrate the processes involved in producing, publishing and marketing such literature over time, from evolving means of production to differing constructions of childhood. In addition, the state-of-the-art Center provides opportunities to study connections between literacy, reading and digital technologies, which is valuable for practitioners as well as scholars.

The Center’s purpose is threefold: 1) to support and encourage scholarly research within its collections; 2) to provide professional training to students and practitioners; and 3) to engage in activities and outreach to the community and beyond. The Center’s collection is of interest to interdisciplinary scholars and practitioners from such fields as youth services librarianship, school library media, children’s literature, education, English, communication, media studies, design, and others interested in studying youth literature, publishing, young people and reading in both an historical and contemporary context.

The Reinberger and Marantz collections combine to form a research library collection of more than 30,000 books and related ephemera.

Following is a sampling of the types of studies which could be done using the collections:

  • The art of picture book illustration (media and techniques)
  • Themes and trends in children’s literature
  • Social construction of childhood through children’s literature
  • Social justice in children’s picturebooks
  • Studies of American Children’s Award winners
  • Historical perspectives on children’s literature (and the work of May Hill Arbuthnot)
  • Contemporary perspectives (ebook vs. print picture books)
  • Reviewing studies (Including the work of Ken and Sylvia Marantz)
  • Publishing studies on books for young readers
  • Study of pop-ups/paper engineering

Criteria for Eligibility

  • Albers: Applicants will be evaluated based on their proven dedication to the study of children’s literature (not specifically picture books) and selection of a topic of study related to the Reinberger and Marantz collections.
  • Marantz: Applicants will be evaluated based on their proven dedication to the study of children’s picture books and selection of a topic of study related to the Reinberger and Marantz collections.
  • Preference will be given to topics likely to be published or otherwise disseminated.
  • Awards also will be based on applicants’ scholarly qualifications.
  • Applicants from diverse academic disciplines are welcome to apply, including but not limited to: youth services librarianship, school library media, children’s literature, art, education, English, communication, media studies, design, art education, illustration, publishing, and others interested in studying youth literature, young people and reading.
  • Applicants must hold at least a master’s degree.

Application Process

Please provide the following materials using the form at this link: http://bit.ly/ksuSLISfellowsApp.

  • A two-page summary addressing the topic of your proposed study and the potential impact of your work. Include an outline of the project and its relationship to previous and current scholarship in the field, how the resources of the Kent State collections will support your research, as well as the anticipated outcome of the project and plans for publication.
  • Curriculum vitae / resume including name, title, contact information, education.
  • A proposed budget of anticipated travel and research expenses, and suggested dates of study in Kent.

Stipends must be used within one year from receipt of funds, at which time expenditure reports will be due.

Applications must be submitted on the appropriate form (http://bit.ly/ksuSLISfellowsApp) no later than midnight on Jan. 30, 2016.

Winners will be announced via email on or before March 1, 2016.

Conditions

  • Recipients of the Marantz Fellowship for Picturebook Research must be willing to present (in-person or online) their research related to the fellowship findings at a future picture book symposium hosted by Kent State University’s School of Library and Information Science.
  • Recipients of the Albers Fellowship must be willing to present (in-person or online) their research related to the fellowship findings at a future symposium hosted by Kent State University’s School of Library and Information Science.
  • Recipients must be willing to have their name, photo and title of research promoted via publicity and marketing channels at Kent State University.
  • Any publications resulting from this support should credit the appropriate fellowship.
  • Applicants agree to send a copy of any ensuing publications to the Reinberger Children’s Library Center at Kent State University’s School of Library and Information Science.

For questions please contact Michelle Baldini: mbaldini@kent.edu or Marianne Martens: mmarten3@kent.edu.

"Warping ’The Sorcerer’s Apprentice,’ or How Young People Are Belittled in Fairy Tales Twisted Against Them": Lecture by Jack Zipes

October 20, 2015

Jack Zipes will be giving a lecture entitled "Warping ’The Sorcerer’s Apprentice,’ or How Young People Are Belittled in Fairy Tales Twisted Against Them" on October 28, 2015 from 2:30PM-4:30PM in Eckhardt Gramatté Hall. This event is sponsored by The University of Winnipeg and the UW Institute for Women’s and Gender Studies.

2015 Children’s Literature in Education Emerging Scholar Award Call for Applications

September 28, 2015

During its long history, the journal Children’s Literature in Education has often benefited from the refreshing ideas and original approaches of young and new scholars in the field of children’s literature. In the current academic climate, the Humanities are under financial pressure in various countries. The competition for (post)doctoral scholarships is keen and tenured positions are becoming rare. CLE, with the support of its publisher, Springer, therefore launched the Children’s Literature in Education Emerging Scholar Award (CLEESA) in 2013, which will run annually.

We are pleased to announce that the 2014 Children’s Literature in Education Emerging Scholar Award has been presented to Meagan Lacy, an Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Information Literacy Services & Instruction at Stella and Charles Guttman Community College, a CUNY school in New York, New York, for her essay "Portraits of Children of Alcoholics: Stories that Add Hope to Hope," which will be published in the December 2015 issue of CLE.

Each year, the prestigious winner receives a prize of $500 and their article is published exclusively in Children’s Literature in Education, with an appropriate acknowledgement of its award-winning status. Excellent essays that do not win the award will still be considered for publication in CLE.

Applicants must submit an essay of 6-8,000 words to the Children’s Literature in Education website before 31 December 2015 (http://www.editorialmanager.com/clid/). For anyone unfamiliar with the journal, details and a preview can be found there, together with a PDF guide to the journal’s house style: http://www.springer.com/education+%26+language/linguistics/journal/10583?detailsPage=pltci_1060388. All submitted articles must conform to this house style.

Submissions must be original works that have not been published previously (including in conference proceedings) and that are not currently under consideration with another journal or edited collection.

For the purpose of eligibility for this award, an Emerging Scholar is defined as someone who meets the following criteria:

  • has not defended a Ph.D. before 31 December 2012
  • has not published books, chapters or peer-reviewed articles on children’s literature before 31 December 2010

Submissions should be accompanied by a brief note indicating that the article is to be considered for the Emerging Scholar Award, and affirming that the author meets these criteria.

"A Phallic Dog, A Stuffed Coyote, and the Boy Who Won’t Come Out: Revisiting Queer Visibility in Young Adult Fiction": A Lecture by Dr. Derritt Mason

September 14, 2015

The Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures is pleased to present "A Phallic Dog, A Stuffed Coyote, and the Boy Who Won’t Come Out: Revisiting Queer Visibility in Young Adult Fiction," a lecture by Dr. Derritt Mason from the University of Calgary on Monday, September 21, 2015, from 2:30PM to 3:30PM. It will take place in Room 2M72 at the University of Winnipeg campus.

This lecture revisits John Donovan’s groundbreaking novel I’ll Get There. It Better Be Worth the Trip, first published in 1969 and widely recognized as the first North American young adult novel with gay content. Now four years shy of its fiftieth anniversary, Donovan’s novel is treated by many contemporary critics as little more than a relic, rife with tropes inherent to the gay problem novels of a bygone era. Dr. Mason argues that this novel—so often lambasted for its hopelessness, stereotypes, and omissions—is a lot queerer than it may initially appear, and much more relevant to contemporary notions of sexuality and queerness than many critics suggest.

Dr. Derritt Mason is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Calgary. His primary teaching and research interests sit at the intersection of children’s literature, queer theory, and cultural studies. Dr. Mason holds a PhD from the University of Alberta, where he wrote a dissertation that deploys anxiety as a lens for thinking about queer young adult fiction and its criticism. His publications include essays on the It Gets Better anti-bullying YouTube project (ESC: English Studies in Canada 38.3-4), and the history of childhood and perversity (Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures 3.1). Dr. Mason recently co-edited a special issue of ESC (40.1) entitled Hysteria Manifest: Cultural Lives of a Great Disorder.

International Exhibit of Wordless Children’s Picture Books Tours Canada

September 2, 2015

International exhibit of wordless children’s picture books tours Canada
Edmonton (Aug 28 to Sept 18), Vancouver (Oct 1 to 22), Toronto (Nov 2 to Dec 11)

People around the world are deeply touched by the desperately dangerous circumstances for boatloads of refugees from Africa and the Middle East, with many arriving on the small island of Lampedusa, Italy. In response to the waves of refugees, IBBY Italia is working to establish the first children’s library in Lampedusa for the young migrants that arrive there every year, as well as for the local children and teens.

With such a diversity of cultures, it made sense to begin the Lampedusa library’s collection with wordless picture books—"silent books" that tell a story with pictures but no text. IBBY Italia gathered a selection of outstanding books from 23 countries, including Spain, the Netherlands, Korea, the UK, the US, and Canada. These wordless picture books begin at the beginning, with the universal language of images and art, bypassing age, culture and language barriers, to offer readers a unique but shared reading experience.

In the true spirit of Jella Lepman who founded IBBY (the International Board on Books for Young People), the library in Lampedusa is conceived to provide a place of peace, reflection, pause and hours of reading enjoyment. It is like a seed library that has been planted and that will grow into a complete collection of books for the use and pleasure of the children who live or pass by there.

To showcase the library, "Silent Books: Final Destination Lampedusa," a travelling exhibit of more than 100 renowned wordless picture books, has been touring around the world. Following stops in cities in Italy, Mexico City and Graz, Austria, the exhibit is now in Canada, travelling to Edmonton, Vancouver and Toronto.

Canadian children and adults will delight in reading these books, experiencing our uniqueness while celebrating our differences. Activities and events to promote and highlight the Silent Books exhibit will include a postcard that Canadian children can fill with a drawing or a message to send back to the children of Lampedusa. Sharing these books may bring us closer to the children who live in Lampedusa and to other children who travel until they find a safe place to call home.

Canadian tour dates for "Silent Books: Final Destination Lampedusa" travelling exhibit:

EDMONTON
Aug. 28 to Sept. 18 - Stanley A. Milner Library, 7 Winston Churchill Square

VANCOUVER
Oct. 1 to 23 - Irving Barber Learning Centre, University of British Columbia, 1961 East Mall
Oct. 8 to 18 - Vancouver Public Library, Central Branch, 350 West Georgia St.
Oct. 10 to 22 - Italian Cultural Centre, 3075 Slocan St.

TORONTO
Nov. 2 to Dec. 11 - Toronto Public Library, North York Central Library, 5120 Yonge St.

IBBY Italia and IBBY Canada thank the Italian Cultural Institute in Toronto for its generous support, as well as IBBY Italia, IBBY International, the Consulate General of Italy in Vancouver, Palazzo delle Esposizioni, Edmonton Public Library, the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver Public Library, and Toronto Public Library. Special thanks to Merle Harris of Edmonton and Dr. Kathryn Shoemaker of Vancouver.

IBBY (www.ibby.org) is committed to bringing books and children together. IBBY (the International Board on Books for Young People) was founded in 1953 by Jella Lepman, and is an international network represented in over 70 countries. IBBY Canada (www.ibby-canada) was formed in 1980 to promote Canadian children’s literature; members include authors, illustrators, librarians, booksellers, educators, and publishers.

For more information, please contact promotions@ibby-canada.org.

2015-16 David Almond Fellowships Call for Applications

August 28, 2015

DAVID ALMOND FELLOWSHIPS FOR RESEARCH IN CHILDREN’S LITERATURE 2015-16

Newcastle University’s School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics and Seven Stories, National Centre for Children’s Books are pleased to announce that the application process for 2015-6 David Almond Fellowships is now open.

Further particulars
The awards recognise both David Almond’s contribution to children’s literature and his connections with these partner institutions: he is a patron of Seven Stories and an honorary graduate of Newcastle University.

The Fellowships aim to promote high-quality research in the Seven Stories collections that will call attention to their breadth and scholarly potential. The three awards of Ł300 each are to facilitate a research visit to the Seven Stories collections in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK of at least three days by a bona fide researcher working on a relevant project. Applications will be considered from candidates in any academic discipline. The successful applicants will have a clearly defined project that will benefit from having access to the Seven Stories collections (please see indicative information about the collections below). All applicants should consult the Seven Stories catalogue as part of preparing their applications: http://www.sevenstories.org.uk/collection/. A well-developed dissemination strategy will be an advantage. Priority will be given to the importance of the project and best use of the Seven Stories collections as judged by a senior member of the Children’s Literature Unit in the School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics at Newcastle University and a senior member of the Collections team at Seven Stories.

Eligibility for the award
Applicants must hold a first degree or higher from a recognised institution of higher education. Note: non-EEA applicants are reminded that to take up a Fellowship they must hold an appropriate visa. Neither Newcastle University nor Seven Stories can help with this process. Please see the UK visas website for more information: http://www.ukvisas.gov.uk/en/howtoapply

Responsibilities
Fellowships must be taken up before the end of April 2016. Recipients are expected to spend at least three days in Newcastle and are encouraged to time their visits to enable them to participate in events organised jointly or separately by the Children’s Literature Unit and Seven Stories. (Please note: successful applicants must contact Seven Stories and agree a date for the visit prior to making travel arrangements; normally a minimum of two weeks’ notice is required before any research visit.) Acknowledgement of the Fellowships must accompany all dissemination activities arising from the research.

The Seven Stories archives
Seven Stories is the only accredited museum in the UK to specialise in children’s books and holds the most substantial collection of British children’s literature archives anywhere in the world. The Collection is made up of over 140 individual archive collections and features original material by over 250 different practitioners: approximately 135 authors, 123 illustrators, 5 critics, 4 editors, and 2 playwrights. There is also material on some key publishers and editors and a substantial book collection, numbering around 40,000 volumes.

The individual author/illustrator holdings vary significantly in size and scope – from a single file through to complex archives documenting an entire career. Many of these holdings are virtually unexplored by scholars to date and provide significant potential for original research, whether by focussing in depth on the work of individual practitioners, or by making links across the individual collections to research a topic from many different angles. The Collection is still growing rapidly, with more and more connections made possible by each new acquisition.

To find out more, please explore the Collection pages of the Seven Stories website - http://www.sevenstories.org.uk/collection, where you will find links to the catalogue records, highlights pages, and blog, all of which may suggest avenues for research. All but the most recently acquired artwork and manuscript collections are fully catalogued. You are also strongly advised to contact with the Seven Stories Collection team when shaping your proposal. They can’t do your research for you, but they can advise on areas of the collection which particularly merit investigation, and steer you away from basing your proposal on holdings which lack sufficient depth to support it. They may also be able to provide information about more recently acquired material which is still being catalogued. To get in touch with the team please email collections@sevenstories.org.uk or call 0191 495 2707.

Application process
Applicants are asked to submit the following items by 1 November, 2015.

  • an application form
  • a curriculum vitae
  • a brief proposal (of 1,000 words maximum)
  • one confidential letter of recommendation (sealed and signed; confidential letters may be included in your application packet or recommenders may send them directly)

Applications may be submitted by email or post.

Email: Kim.Reynolds@ncl.ac.uk

Post:
David Almond Fellowships
School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics
Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU
UK

Perry Nodelman Receives the International Brothers Grimm Award

July 2, 2015

The International Institute for Children’s Literature in Osaka (IICLO) is pleased to announce Perry Nodelman as the fifteenth recipient of the International Brothers Grimm Award.

In September 2014, IICLO sent questionnaires to 400 scholars in which they requested recommendations for candidates, and by the end of November 2014, the IICLO had selected 12 nominees. In December 2014, after researching these nominees and their achievements, the Japanese committee members narrowed the list of candidates down to the following four:

Clare Bradford (Australia)
Hans-Heino Ewers (Germany)
Perry Nodelman (Canada)
Roberta Seelinger Trites (U.S.A.)

In March 2015, a final meeting of the Japanese committee was held, and they decided that the winner was Professor Perry Nodelman in Canada. The award presentation ceremony and Professor Perry Nodelman’s commemorative lecture will be held on 21 November 2015. At the ceremony, a trophy and a prize of one million yen will be given by the Kinrankai Foundation, a supporter of the award.

Dr. Perry Nodelman, Professor Emeritus of University of Winnipeg, is an exemplary researcher of children’s literature and picture books internationally. His main works published in book form are: Words About Pictures: The Narrative Art of Children’s Picture Books (1988), The Pleasures of Children’s Literature (1992), and The Hidden Adult: Defining Children’s Literature (2008), all of which are highly esteemed. Words About Pictures in particular has received international recognition as a groundbreaking work in the field of research on picture books. The Pleasures of Children’s Literature is renowned as a textbook for the research of children’s literature for university students and has been translated for publication in China, Taiwan, and Korea.

He was editor of the Children’s Literature Association Quarterly for five years (1983-87) and Canadian Children’s Literature/Littérature canadienne pour la jeunesse for five years (2004-2008). He also wrote many articles on children’s literature theory and reviews of research books on children’s literature, all of which contributed to development of research in the field.

He is also a writer of twelve books of children’s and young adult fiction. Among them, the four books of the Minds Series, written with Carol Matas, are works of fantasy which encourage logical thinking and have been translated into Japanese.

Dr. Nodelman taught at the University of Winnipeg in Canada for thirty-seven years and provided valuable support to many researchers.

Jeunesse Articles Receive ChLA Awards

June 26, 2015

Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures is pleased to announce that two articles published in the journal were honoured at the 2015 Children’s Literature Association conference that took place in June in Richmond, Virginia.

The ChLA Article Award for outstanding article was awarded to Zetta Elliott for "The Trouble with Magic: Conjuring the Past in New York City Parks," published in Issue 5.2 (2013), and Rachel Conrad received the Honor Award for her article, "’We Are Masters at Childhood’: Time and Agency in Poetry by, for, and about Children," also published in Issue 5.2 (2013).

ChLA Article Awards are awarded annually by the Children’s Literature Association to recognize outstanding articles focusing on a literary, historical, theoretical, or cultural examination of children’s texts and/or children’s culture. Winning articles have been judged to provide new insights into the field, making a distinct or significant scholarly contribution to the understanding of children’s literature. The Children’s Literature Association is a non-profit association of scholars, critics, professors, students, librarians, teachers and institutions dedicated to the academic study of literature for children. ChLA recognizes exceptional scholarship in and service to the field of children’s literature by annually selecting recipients for awards promoting international scholarship; honoring undergraduate, graduate, and faculty scholarship; honoring lifetime service to the field; and celebrating works of literature for children of high literary merit.

Housed at the Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures at the University of Winnipeg, Jeunesse is an interdisciplinary, refereed academic journal whose mandate is to publish research on and to provide a forum for discussion about cultural productions for, by, and about young people.

Jacqueline Wilson Scholarship - University of Roehampton

June 2, 2015

UNIVERSITY OF ROEHAMPTON
Department of English and Creative Writing

Postgraduate research studentships – Jacqueline Wilson Scholarship

The University of Roehampton is pleased to make its annual Jacqueline Wilson Scholarship open to a general call for research topics in the field of children’s literature. This will be awarded to a postgraduate PhD student working in the field of children’s literature or creative writing for children. The Jacqueline Wilson Scholar will be based in the award-winning National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature (NCRCL) with access to the Children’s Literature Collection and archives, and will join a lively community of researchers, writers and students. This fully funded scholarship will cover home/EU fees of Ł4052 for Home/EU students and maintenance of Ł16,057 p.a. in 2015/16 for 3 years full-time subject to satisfactory progress.

The scholarship is open to new students only and preference may be given to proposals that build on the research interests of the NCRCL. These include, but are not limited to: philosophy; theory; historical fiction; landscape; domestic spaces; memory; reading. Applicants are encouraged to identify potential supervisors as part of their application.

The Department of English and Creative Writing with over 600 students and 33 academic staff, has a growing international reputation for its research and teaching excellence. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), 80% of all our research publications were ranked as "world leading" or "internationally excellent" for their impact. The successful candidate will become part of an active and growing community of postgraduate scholars in a vibrant research culture, established external collaborations with London institutions and a very good track record of student success.

The Department is looking for candidates of the highest quality, capable of submitting a Ph.D. thesis within 3 years. Applicants should have completed an MA degree in a relevant subject, such as children’s literature, reading or memory, prior to the start of the studentship. Applicants should also be able to demonstrate strong research capabilities and fluency in spoken and written English that meets the university’s entrance criteria for doctoral study.

The University of Roehampton is set on a beautiful, traditional campus in south-west London. The University provides its students with exceptional facilities, high quality teaching and a close-knit, collegiate experience. It has a diverse student body and a cosmopolitan outlook, with students from over 130 countries.

Deadline for applications: 3 July 2015
Interviews will be held on 8 July 2015.

For further information or for informal discussion please contact Professor David Rudd: d.rudd@roehampton.ac.uk.

Transcultural Production of Children’s Literature in Postwar Taiwan: Liang Lin’s I Want a Big Rooster and Little Duckling Gets Back Home - A Lecture by Andrea Mei-Ying Wu

May 28, 2015

The Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures is pleased to host a lecture by Dr. Andrea Mei-Ying Wu, a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Minnesota and Associate Professor at National Cheng Kung University in Taiwan. Her lecture, entitled “Transcultural Production of Children’s Literature in Postwar Taiwan: Liang Lin’s I Want a Big Rooster and Little Duckling Gets Back Home,” will take place from 10:00AM to 11:15AM on Thursday, June 11 in room 3M52 at the University of Winnipeg.

If globalization is to be understood as a process infused with dynamic and multi-dimensional interactions, communications, negotiations, and at times tensions and confrontations, it is significant to see how local subjects (re)imagine, (re)define, and represent themselves in the global context and how they react to and (re)appropriate the norms of the dominant in the transcultural process. This lecture will deal with the transcultural production of children’s literature in postwar Taiwan, with a focus on Liang Lin’s Wo yao da gongji (I Want a Big Rooster) and Xiao yaya huijia (Little Duckling Gets Back Home), two of the initial and representative publications of ertong duwu bianji xiaozu (the Editorial Task Force for Children’s Books) in the early postwar decades.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: IBBY Canada’s Joanne Fitzgerald Illustrator in Residence Program

April 15, 2015

IBBY Canada invites submissions from Canadian children’s book illustrators for the 2015 Joanne Fitzgerald Illustrator in Residence Program. The program provides a jury-selected illustrator with a month-long residency, hosted by the Toronto Public Library. Submissions will be evaluated by a jury of experts in children’s books and illustration. The submission deadline is Thursday, April 30, 2015.

Overview of IBBY Canada’s Joanne Fitzgerald Illustrator in Residence Program:

  • Held at Toronto Public Library, Northern District Branch at Yonge and Eglinton
  • One month residency from October 1 to 31, 2015
  • Illustrator plans and delivers programming that includes workshops for adults, art activities for classes of children, presentations at high schools and colleges, one-on-one portfolio reviews, and a display of their work in the library gallery
  • Remuneration is provided to the illustrator: $4,000 for one-month term, plus reimbursement for art supplies purchased for the program
  • Travel, accommodation and meals are the responsibility of the illustrator (IBBY Canada can help the selected find billeting accommodations, if required)

Requirements for illustrators:

  • Illustrated four or more professionally published children’s books, with publication of a new book expected in the next few years
  • Experienced at developing and delivering programs for adults, children and teens
  • Active online presence and willing to promote their participation in the program
  • Friendly and empathetic, with an understanding of the needs of aspiring artists
  • Preparatory sketches and finished work, mounted/framed for display in the library gallery
  • Canadian citizen, permanent resident of Canada

Applications should be in a single pdf format document, and include the following:

  1. CV that includes public presentation experience and a list of published books
  2. Two letters of reference about public presentation experience
  3. Well-considered plans and ideas for programming for school classes visiting the library, for adults, and for high school/college students (please see guidelines below). Please send application by Thursday, April 30, 2015 to promotions@ibby-canada.org.

Programming guidelines:

  1. School classes from Grade 2 to Grade 6, with 20 to 25 kids per class, come to the library during the residency. School classes are 90 minutes each, held on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, with a class in the morning and another in the afternoon. Teachers accompany and supervise each class. Programming should include a hands-on art activity with a finished piece each child can take with them (or a finished group project). Since each class has different kids and teachers, the format and content can be similar for all the classes, modified for different ages as needed.
  2. Adult presentations are 60 or 90 minutes long, with 10 to 20 adults attending. There will be about 5 adult presentations in total, held at the library on Thursday evenings. Adults seem to be less interested in hands-on art activities, preferring presentations about working as an illustrator, building a portfolio, overviews of children’s publishing, and related topics. Since some people attend multiple presentations, illustrators should suggest a range of programming ideas for adults, which include visuals (such as PowerPoint).
  3. High school and college presentations are about 40 to 60 minutes long and will be at the school or college. Programs for this audience can be similar to those for adults.

The Joanne Fitzgerald Illustrator in Residence program is a joint project of IBBY Canada, Toronto Public Library, and the Canadian Urban Libraries Council, with financial support from Joanne’s family.

The program honours Joanne Fitzgerald (1956–2011), who illustrated many influential Canadian children’s books, including Plain Noodles, Emily’s House, The Blue Hippopotamus, and Governor General’s Award winner Doctor Kiss Says Yes. In memory of Joanne Fitzgerald’s commitment to children’s books and illustration, her family collaborated with IBBY Canada to establish the program.

IBBY (International Board on Books for Young People) was founded in 1953 to bring books and children together; today there are IBBY sections in more than 75 countries around the world, including India, Japan, France, Uganda, Finland, and the United States. IBBY Canada, formed in 1980, promotes quality French and English language Canadian children’s literature nationally and internationally.

Book Launch for Seriality and Texts for Young People

March 24, 2015

Please join members and friends of the UW’s Cultural Studies Graduate Program to celebrate the launch of a new book of essays: Seriality and Texts for Young People: The Compulsion to Repeat edited by Mavis Reimer, Nyala Ali, Deanna England, and Melanie Dennis Unrau.

Friday, March 27 at 12:30 in 2C13

brief readings from the text
refreshments will be served

Seriality and Texts for Young People, published by Palgrave Macmillan, contains an introduction by the editors and 13 original scholarly essays, including UW and UW-affiliated scholars charlie peters, Brandon Christopher, Perry Nodelman, Debra Dudek, and Larissa Wodtke. The volume originated in the international symposium Narrative, Repetition, and Texts for Young People, conceived by Dr. Mavis Reimer and hosted by her graduate class in Cultural Studies at the UW in June 2011. Please join us to celebrate this distinguished achievement by our colleagues.

Dr. Seuss Story Time and Screening

February 26, 2015

Come beat the post-reading-week blahs on March 3, 2015 from 3:00PM-5:00PM for a Dr. Seuss Story Time event hosted by the students of the Dept. of English Practicum in Literacy, Language and Literature course, and the University of Winnipeg library. Interactive reading of Seuss classics with special guest reader Jennifer Still, U of W’s Carol Shields Writer-in-Residence.

Screenings of old school Seuss animation films to follow!

Where: University of Winnipeg library, Stimpson Media Gallery (in front of the UW library entrance)
When: March 3, 2015 3-4 PM Storytime followed by screenings of Seuss animation to follow until 5 PMish
Who: UW students, staff, friends and families are all welcome! Coffee, tea, and snacks for all.

New Book - Seriality and Texts for Young People

February 4, 2015

Seriality and Texts for Young People: The Compulsion to Repeat, edited by Mavis Reimer, Nyala Ali, Deanna England, and Melanie Dennis Unrau, is now available from Palgrave Macmillan.

Seriality and Texts for Young People is a collection of thirteen original, scholarly essays about series and serial texts directed to children and youth. Each begins from the premise that a basic principle of seriality is repetition and explores what that means for a range of primary texts, including popular narrative series for children, comics, magazines, TV series, and digital texts. Contributors featured include internationally-recognised scholars such as Perry Nodelman, Margaret Mackey and Laurie Langbauer, and the essays cover texts such as the Harry Potter novels, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Anne of Green Gables. The introduction provides a framework for the detailed explorations, reviewing some of the most important contemporary theories of repetition, pointing to some key criticism on series, and speculating on the significance of the series form for the field of young people’s texts.

Table of Contents

Introduction: The Compulsion to Repeat; Mavis Reimer, Nyala Ali, Deanna England, and Melanie Dennis Unrau

1. Off to See the Wizard Again and Again; Laurie Langbauer

2. "Anne repeated": Taking Anne Out of Order; Laura M. Robinson

3. Kierkegaard’s Repetition and the Reading Pleasures of Repetition in Diana Wynne Jones’s Howl’s Moving Castle Series; Rose Lovell-Smith

4. Harry Potter Fans Discover the Pleasures of Transfiguration; Eliza T. Dresang and Kathleen Campana

5. Girls, Animals, Fear, and the Iterative Force of the National Pack: Reading the Dear Canada Series; Charlie Peters

6. "But what is his country?": Producing Australian Identity through Repetition in the Victorian School Paper, 1896-1918; Michelle J. Smith

7. Serializing Scholarship: (Re)Producing Girlhood in Atalanta; Kristine Moruzi

8. "I will not / be haunted / by myself!": Originality, Derivation, and the Hauntology of the Superhero Comic; Brandon Christopher

9. Michael Yahgulanaas’s Red and the Structures of Sequential Art; Perry Nodelman

10. The Beloved That Does Not Bite: Genre, Myth, and Repetition in Buffy the Vampire Slayer; Debra Dudek

11. Roy and the Wimp: The Nature of an Aesthetic of Unfinish; Margaret Mackey

12. MP3 as Contentious Message: When Infinite Repetition Fuses with the Acoustic Sphere; Larissa Wodtke

13. The Little Transgender Mermaid: A Shape-Shifting Tale; Nat Hurley

"You get to BE Harold’s Purple Crayon": The Limitations and Opportunities of Picture Book Apps - Naomi Hamer Skywalk Lecture

September 29, 2014

"You get to BE Harold’s Purple Crayon": The Limitations and Opportunities of Picture Book Apps, a Skywalk Lecture by Dr. Naomi Hamer

Wednesday, October 22, 2014 from 12:00PM to 1:00PM
Millennium Library - Carol Shields Auditorium, 251 Donald Street
Free admission

This lecture focuses on the changing conceptualization and design of the children’s picture book in the context of emerging mobile and interactive technologies. Contemporary picture books are increasingly produced and consumed through interactive picture book applications ("apps") for mobile devices such as the iPad. Framed by theoretical and methodological approaches from game studies, social semiotics, and New Literacies Studies, Dr. Hamer will examine how picture books apps remediate the discourses articulated in the classic picture books and reflect the tensions the affordances and the limitations of interactive mobile technologies to offer dynamic modes to represent and interact with narrative.

For more information on Skywalk Lectures see schedule.

Sensing War: Children’s Memories of the Wartime Atlantic, 1939-1945

September 19, 2014

A public lecture by Dr. Barbara Lorenzkowski presented by the H. Sanford Riley Centre for Canadian History

Date and Time: Tuesday, October 14, 7:00PM
Location: Oral History Centre, 2B22, University of Winnipeg

In the port cities of Atlantic Canada, children and youth grew up in a self-declared battle front during the years of the Second World War. For these youngsters, the war had a raw immediacy; for the Battle of the Atlantic transformed the waters and streets of Halifax, Nova Scotia, beyond recognition. It was not just the navy, army, air force and merchant marine that clogged the harbour and city streets; an unprecedented influx of military vehicles, as well, invaded the city, curtailing children’s range of movement and spaces of play.

This public lecture is an exercise in sensuous geography. Drawn from Dr. Lorenzkowski’s larger work on the spaces of childhood in Atlantic Canada, it listens to close to forty childhood recollections of the wartime Atlantic. In making sense of the "war zone" that was Halifax, Dr. Lorenzkowski’s interview partners evoked the allure of nocturnal urban spaces, the sounds of German U-boat attacks, and the stunning sight of the Bedford Basin, filled to the rim with war convoys. If, as Proust held in Remembrance of Things Past, the senses provide a key to both memory and the emotions, these oral recollections serve as a reminder that the spaces of childhood are very much "sensescapes" – recalled all the more vividly if her interview partners’ younger selves had been granted (or secretively claimed) the freedom to roam in their city at war.

Dr. Barbara Lorenzkowski is an Associate Professor of History at Concordia University in Montreal. She is the author of Sounds of Ethnicity: Listening to German North America (University of Manitoba Press, 2010) and has published several book chapters and articles on the history of migration, culture and transnationalism, and the history of childhood and youth. Barbara Lorenzkowski’s current research project is a FQRSC-funded study of "The Children’s War: Growing Up in the Port Cities of St. John‟s (Newfoundland), Halifax (Nova Scotia) and Saint John (New Brunswick)" that is based on around ninety life-course interviews.

Childhood in the Twentieth Century: Perspectives from History

September 19, 2014

Date and Time: Friday, October 17, 2014 – 1:00PM–3:30PM
Location: University of Winnipeg, Room 3C12 (Dean’s Board Room)

The University of Winnipeg Department of History (with the aid of the Riley Centre in Canadian History) wishes to welcome all faculty, students and community members to a half-day symposium, Children and Childhood in the Twentieth Century. The three papers will touch on issues as varied as: delinquency, medical practice, children and wartime, children’s urban experience, and childhood and family in the Cold War military. Scholars and students of all disciplines are welcome.

Participants:

Dr. Delia Gavrus, Department of History, University of Winnipeg, "Surgery and the Juvenile Delinquent in the Progressive Era."

Dr. Barbara Lorenzkowski, Department of History, Concordia University, "Place, Mobility and the Culture of the Street: Listening to the Rhythms of Boyhood in Wartime Halifax, 1939-1945."

Dr. Sharon Wall, Department of History, University of Winnipeg "’There’s no Life Like It’: Postwar Childhood and Family in the Canadian Armed Forces."

Opportunity for discussion will follow each paper.

2014-15 David Almond Fellowships Call for Applications

June 11, 2014

DAVID ALMOND FELLOWSHIPS FOR RESEARCH IN CHILDREN’S LITERATURE 2014-5

Newcastle University’s School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics and Seven Stories, National Centre for Children’s Books are pleased to announce that the application process for 2014-5 David Almond Fellowships is now open.

Further particulars

The awards recognise both David Almond’s contribution to children’s literature and his connections with these partner institutions: he is a patron of Seven Stories and an honorary graduate of Newcastle University.

The Fellowships aim to promote high-quality research in the Seven Stories collections that will call attention to their breadth and scholarly potential. The two awards of Ł300 each are to facilitate a research visit to the Seven Stories collections in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK of at least three days by a bona fide researcher working on a relevant project. Applications will be considered from candidates in any academic discipline. The successful applicants will have a clearly defined project that will benefit from having access to the Seven Stories collections (please see indicative information about the collections below). All applicants should consult the Seven Stories catalogue as part of preparing their applications: http://www.sevenstories.org.uk/collection/. A well-developed dissemination strategy will be an advantage. Priority will be given to the importance of the project and best use of the Seven Stories collections as judged by a senior member of the Children’s Literature Unit in the School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics at Newcastle University and a senior member of the Collections team at Seven Stories.

Eligibility for the award

Applicants must hold a first degree or higher from a recognised institution of higher education.

Note: non-EEA applicants are reminded that to take up a Fellowship they must hold an appropriate visa. Neither Newcastle University nor Seven Stories can help with this process. Please see the UK visas website for more information: http://www.ukvisas.gov.uk/en/howtoapply

Responsibilities

Fellowships must be taken up before the end of April 2015. Recipients are expected to spend at least three days in Newcastle and are encouraged to time their visits to enable them to participate in events organised jointly or separately by the Children’s Literature Unit and Seven Stories. (Please note: successful applicants must contact Seven Stories and agree a date for the visit prior to making travel arrangements; normally a minimum of two weeks’ notice is required before any research visit.) Acknowledgement of the Fellowships must accompany all dissemination activities arising from the research.

The Seven Stories archives

Seven Stories is the only accredited museum specialising in children’s books in the UK. Its collections an support original research, particularly in documenting aspects of the creation, publication and reception of books for children from the 1930s to the present day. The steadily growing archive contains material from over 100 authors, illustrators, editors, and others involved in the children’s publishing industry in Britain.

The following are a few examples of particularly substantial collections and their research potential:

The Ursula Moray Williams archive spans the career of a prolific and highly regarded children’s author and documents her working relationships with illustrators and editors. Her collection offers a valuable opportunity for research into all aspects of the process of writing, editing and publishing books for children in the mid- to late-twentieth century.

The Leila Berg archive covers the broad and varied career of a writer and journalist who championed children’s rights and comprehensive education. Material relating to Berg’s published works for children offers a unique opportunity to study the creative output of one of the foremost proponents of realism in British children’s literature. In addition, Berg’s correspondence, articles, and notes are a hugely valuable resource for anyone interested in the study of children’s welfare and education in twentieth-century Britain.

The Geoffrey Trease archive comprises a substantial wealth of material charting the creative output of one of Britain’s most important children’s writers. The collection includes research material, notes and drafts relating to a significant number of Trease’s works for children. Material documenting Trease’s early career, as well as a selection of lectures and articles by Trease, gives a valuable account of the writer as a proponent of a more progressive and realist children’s literature.

The David Wood archive is currently the largest collection in terms of scale; it provides a broad and comprehensive reflection of the work of Britain’s foremost children’s playwright. The collection includes material relating to the vast majority of Wood’s plays and books, as well as notes, drafts, and correspondence relating to the production and publication of plays and books for children. It offers a highly unique opportunity for research into all aspects of children’s theatre and performing arts.

The Peter Dickinson archive is a broad and valuable record of the creative process of a prize-winning and highly renowned children’s author. In particular, the material documents in some detail the working relationship between author and editor. As Dickinson was successful in both Britain and America, the collection also provides a great deal of information on the publication of children’s books in both countries.

The Diana Wynne Jones archive contains a diversity of material documenting the life and career of one of Britain’s most highly regarded fantasy writers. The collection includes papers from Jones’ childhood, draft material for the majority of her works, personal and professional correspondence, and various other papers. It offers a unique opportunity for research into the children’s book industry and the creative formation of a writer.

More information can be found on the Collection pages of the Seven Stories website - http://www.sevenstories.org.uk/collection. All of the artwork and manuscript collections are fully catalogued, and the catalogues can be searched online via the link provided on the website. A list of many of the authors and illustrators represented in the collection can be found at: http://www.sevenstories.org.uk/collection/authors-and-illustrators

(Please bear in mind that this is not a complete list of the collections.)

Application process

Applicants are asked to submit the following items by 1 August, 2014.

  • an application form
  • a curriculum vitae
  • a brief proposal (of 1,000 words maximum)
  • one confidential letter of recommendation (sealed and signed; confidential letters may be included in your application packet or recommenders may send them directly)

Applications may be submitted by email or post.

Email: Kim.Reynolds@ncl.ac.uk

Post:David Almond Fellowships
School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics, Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, United Kingdom

Pīsim Finds Her Miskanow wins Award from Canadian Archaeological Association

May 1, 2014

We are happy to announce that Pīsim Finds Her Miskanow has won a 2014 Public Communications Award from the Canadian Archaeological Association (CAA).

The CAA Public Awards Committee noted that this visually stunning book involved a large collaborative effort, including First Nation community members, early childhood educators, archaeologists, anthropologists, linguists, and historians. They appreciated that it seeks to meld two visions and approaches to Cree culture-history through a work of creative fiction designed to bring the many facets of traditional Cree culture alive for Native and non-Native readers alike, both young and old. The committee found this book to represent an extremely unique and creatively engaging manner of presenting archaeological information to the public.

For more information on the Pīsim project, visit our Projects.

Pīsim Finds Her Miskanow Shortlisted for Two Manitoba Book Awards

April 2, 2014

The picture book Pīsim Finds Her Miskanow has been shortlisted for two 2013 Manitoba Books Awards: Manuela Dias Book Design of the Year and McNally Robinson Book for Young People Award – Older Category.

Pīsim is the result of a five-year collaboration between storyteller and educator William Dumas and a team of researchers and educators managed by the Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures. For more information, see our Projects.

The 2013 Manitoba Book Awards take place Sunday, April 27, 2014 at the West End Cultural Centre. Doors open at 6:30 pm and the ceremonies begin at 7:00 pm. Admission is free.

#uwinlibrary Project

March 25, 2014

Funded by the Experiential Learning Fund of the University of Winnipeg, the students of ENGL-3120 Practicum in Literacy, Language and Literature have chosen to focus their class action project on the UW library. As an action project, they have proposed a temporary redesign of one of the study mezzanines to raise student awareness and interest in library study spaces. Through this creation of a study space, the practicum students hope to encourage their fellow UW students to contribute ideas about what they would like from the library and library study spaces in the future. The project will be promoted through posters, postcards, a design-oriented book display, and a little free library (leave a book-take a book) set-up in the UWSA Hive space. Students can submit ideas both through social media and through postcards, and floor plan ideas to be submitted into a dropbox in the library. The project will be written up as a report with findings and proposals for the creation of a future student advisory board, and other student-oriented projects/events at the UW library.

The project is part of an initiative to encourage experiential and hands-on learning in undergraduate courses at UW. The students work as a group to plan, implement, and report on their community-oriented project.

Please be in touch with Dr. Naomi Hamer (n.hamer@uwinnipeg.ca) with any questions.

More info:

http://uwinlibrary.tumblr.com/
http://news-centre.uwinnipeg.ca/all-posts/uwinnipeg-supports-hands-on-learning-projects-for-students/

Indigenous Children’s Literature Panel at Manitoba Indigenous Writers’ Festival

January 14, 2014

On Saturday, January 18, 2014, the Manitoba Indigenous Writers’ Festival will feature a panel on Indigenous Children’s Literature at 10:00AM in the Carol Shields Auditorium at the Millennium Library.

This panel will feature Sherry Farrell Racette (Associate Professor in Native Studies at the University of Manitoba), Jordan Wheeler (author of Just a Walk, Christmas At Wapos Bay and Achimoona: Native Stories ), and Elizabeth Denny (author of Jenneli’s Dance).

For more information about the festival, visit their Facebook page.

Girls, Texts, Cultures Available for Pre-Order

January 3, 2014

Girls, Texts, Cultures, a volume initiated by a symposium hosted by the Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures, is now available for pre-order through Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

Girls, Texts, Cultures cover

Edited by Clare Bradford and Mavis Reimer, this book focuses on girls and girlhoods, texts for and about girls, and the cultural contexts that shape girls’ experience. It brings together scholars from girls’ studies and children’s literature, fields that have traditionally conducted their research separately, and the collaboration showcases the breadth and complexity of girl-related studies.

Contributors from disciplines such as sociology, literature, education, and gender studies combine these disciplinary approaches in novel ways with insights from international studies, postcolonial studies, game studies, and other fields. Several of the authors engage in activist and policy-development work around girls who experience poverty and marginalization. Each essay is concerned in one way or another with the politics of girlhood as they manifest in national and cultural contexts, in the everyday practices of girls, and in textual ideologies and agendas.

In contemporary Western societies girls and girlhood function to some degree as markers of cultural reproduction and change. The essays in this book proceed from the assumption that girls are active participants in the production of texts and cultural forms; they offer accounts of the diversity of girls’ experience and complex significances of texts by, for, and about girls.

Clare Bradford is a professor of literary studies at Deakin University, Melbourne. She has published over seventy essays on children’s literature. Her books include Unsettling Narratives: Postcolonial Readings of Children’s Literature (WLU Press, 2007) and New World Orders in Contemporary Children’s Literature: Utopian Transformations (2009). In 2009 she was awarded the first International Trudeau Fellowship.

Mavis Reimer is a Canada Research Chair in Young People’s Texts and Cultures and a professor of English at the University of Winnipeg, where she is also the Dean of Graduate Studies. She is lead editor of the scholarly journal Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures and co-author, with Perry Nodelman, of The Pleasures of Children’s Literature (3rd ed., 2003).

"The Beloved Does Not Bite: Moral Vampires and the Humans Who Love Them" by Dr. Debra Dudek

December 19, 2013

The Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures is pleased to host a lecture, "The Beloved Does Not Bite: Moral Vampires and the Humans Who Love Them," by Dr. Debra Dudek on January 27 from 12:30 to 1:20. It will take place in room 1L07 at the University of Winnipeg.

In this talk, Dr. Dudek moves from a broad definition of a new sub-genre of vampire texts—the Beloved Cycle—to a close reading of an episode of The Vampire Diaries in order to demonstrate how looking leads to loving. In his article, "Love as a Moral Emotion," J. David Velleman engages with Iris Murdoch’s theory that "love is an exercise in ’really looking’" and suggests that this process of loving "arrests our tendencies toward emotional self-protection from another person, tendencies to draw ourselves in and close ourselves off from being affected by him. Love disarms our emotional defences; it makes us vulnerable to the other" (361). Dr. Dudek argues that a generic shift into the Beloved Cycle connects "really looking" to a love-based justice in which emotional evaluations allow for a reconsideration of what it means to act ethically.

Dr. Debra Dudek works at the University of Wollongong, Australia as a Senior Lecturer in English Literatures, as an Associate Dean (International), and as Director of the Centre for Canadian-Australian Studies. She has published internationally on Canadian, Australian, and Children’s Literature. In her current research, she analyses representations of ethics, emotions, and monsters in series fiction, film, and television for young people.

"Playground Culture: The Playground Movement and Peter Friedl’s Playgrounds" by Dr. Ann Marie Murnaghan

November 12, 2013

The UW Youth and Culture Research Cluster, with the Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures, will be hosting a new presentation for the Fall Term by Dr. Ann Marie Murnaghan, who works in the Department of Environment and Geography at the University of Manitoba. Her presentation is entitled “Playground Culture: The Playground Movement and Peter Friedl’s Playgrounds,” and it will take place on Wednesday, November 13 from 12:30 to 1:20 in room 1L07.

At the turn of the twentieth century, progressive North American cities were creating children’s playgrounds with swings, slides, teeters, and supervised play instruction as socio-spatial manifestations of the moral reform movement. By the turn of the twenty-first century, playgrounds were naturalized into the urban form, seen as benign spaces that belie their complicated, constructed pasts. In this presentation on Toronto’s playground history, and contemporary global playgrounds, using the photographic tour-de-force of Peter Friedl’s Playgrounds,1995-2004 (2008), Ann Marie Murnaghan speaks to the place of childhood in material urban culture, and its implications for ideas about public space.

Visual/Verbal Workshop Series

October 21, 2013

These two workshops, sponsored by the Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures, are recommended for student teachers, educators, and others interested in young people’s texts and cultures, picture books, and cross-media literacies. Please email n.hamer@uwinnipeg.ca to reserve a place in the workshops. Light refreshments will be provided.

“You get to BE Harold’s Purple Crayon”: The Limitations and Opportunities of the Picture Book App for Mobile and Interactive Platforms
October 22, 2:30PM to 5:15PM
Room 2D12

This is a hands-on workshop with Naomi Hamer, assistant professor in the Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures. It will explore the design and development of picture book apps using theoretical and methodological approaches from game studies, social semiotics, and New Literacies Studies. The workshop will examine the opportunities and limitations offered by these apps for informal and classroom-based learning, often in conjunction with the use of print picture books. Additional information about useful review sites, links and other resources will be distributed and discussed.

Picture Books as Performance
November 7, 2:30PM to 5:15PM
Room 3M57

This is a workshop with special guest Kari-Lynn Winters, assistant professor in the Faculty of Education at Brock University, who is also a picture book author and playwright. Engagement is created through a range of semiotic interactions—images and words, but also through modes of performance, such as gestures and digital media. In light of these kinds of interactions, this workshop will explore how educators may connect with children in order to develop semiotic and critical practices, and to participate in developing their literate communities. Check out http://kariwinters.com for more information about Kari-Lynn.

CFP - On the Move, In the World…Mobility and Young People

October 3, 2013

On the Move, In the World…Mobility and Young People
A One-day Conference Organized by ARCYP in partnership with ACCUTE At the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences
Brock University
May 27, 2014
DEADLINE: November 1, 2013

Website: http://arcyp.ca

Mobility and young people: taken together, these terms produce both anxiety and possibility. On the move in the world, young people are widely perceived to be in danger or at risk. Yet young people’s mobility may also be aspirational or generative, as adventure, transformation, good fortune, and border-crossings of all kinds can effect changes in status and re-orientations of consciousness and identity. Further, the narratives circulated by and for those youth are themselves subject to revisions once they, too, have been put in motion. And the very thought of young people’s mobility puts us in the realms of affect and embodiment, of ability and impairment. Affect raises questions about the emotional landscape of the young people so moved, how young people are deployed in a variety of media to move adults, and the ways in which we map and describe our attachments to those cultural objects we find to be moving. The body in motion invites us to think of childhood in terms of kinesthetics, choreography, and ideologies and architectures of enablement, while the very idea of mobile youth asks us to consider spatio-temporal relationships: how young people move through space and time, measuring time by space and vice versa. All of these ways of thinking about mobility in the context of youth cultures take various narrative, political, aesthetic, and conceptual forms— narratives that are, themselves, subject to movement and therefore subject to revision, reconsideration, subversion, and change. Mobility itself might be seen to generate new youth movements—opening up ways to think about the cultures of young people and for young people to move our sense of culture.

ARCYP invites proposals for papers (or panels) that consider any and all facets of young people’s mobility/movement. Topics to be considered under the theme of "mobility and young people" may include (but are not limited to):

  • Danger, Risk and Safety
  • Dancing Children
  • Border Crossings and Home(land) Security Systems
  • Narrative Subversions and Revisions
  • Movement as Performance/Choreography
  • Narratives of Upward/Downward Mobility
  • Transformations through Mobility/Mobilizing Transformations
  • Mobile Audiences and Audiences of Mobility
  • Temporalities of Youth
  • Movement as Affect and Affect as "Being Moved"
  • Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
  • Capitalism’s Children
  • Immigration and Generations
  • Ability and Impairment
  • Kinesthetics or Kin-aesthetics
  • Mapping Youth Cultures
  • Circuits of Childhood
  • Mobilizing Youth Polities
  • Digital Movement and Mobile Communication

Following the instructions at http://accute.ca/joint-sessions/, if you are submitting a paper, send three documents in separate electronic files directly to admin@arcyp.ca by November 1, 2013:

  1. A 300- to 500-word proposal, without identifying marks;
  2. A 100-word abstract;
  3. 50-word biographical statement; and
  4. A Proposal Submissions Information Sheet.
If you are submitting a panel proposal, please include:
  1. A 700-word panel description, plus 300-word abstracts for each paper in the panel;
  2. A 150-word panel abstract;
  3. 50-word biographical statements for each member of the panel; and
  4. A Proposal Submissions Information Sheet, including contact information for all panel participants.

NOTES: You must be a current member of ARCYP or ACCUTE to submit to this session. Rejected submissions will not be moved into the general "pool" of ACCUTE submissions.

"Connected Learning: New Media Ecology and Young People" A Lecture by Dr. Mimi Ito, MacArthur Foundation Chair in Digital Media and Learning at the University of California, Irvine

September 23, 2013

Date: October 9, 2013
Time: 12:00PM - 1:30PM
Place: Eckhardt-Gramatté Hall, University of Winnipeg

Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures is pleased to co-sponsor "Connected Learning: New Media Ecology and Young People," a lecture by Dr. Mimi Ito, MacArthur Foundation Chair in Digital Media and Learning at the University of California, Irvine. This event is also sponsored by the UW President’s Office, Dean of Arts, the Department of Rhetoric, Writing, and Communications, and the Department of English.

The Internet, digital media production tools, portable media, and social gaming environments are part of broad-based shifts in how we express ourselves, produce and access knowledge, and connect with others. This new media ecology can be a powerful driver of meaningful, demand-driven, and socially connected learning, but in our research, we found that very few young people, parents, and educators were taking advantage of this potential. Really tapping into the learning potential of today’s new media environment requires building more robust connections between formal and informal learning environments, and across social, recreational, and academic activities. This talk will describe what research in the MacArthur Foundation Digital Media and Learning Initiative has taught us about the some of the shifts in how young people are learning and engaging with new media, and areas of opportunity for supporting learning keyed to a networked age.

Mimi Ito is a cultural anthropologist of technology use who works on young people, new media, and fandom at the University of California, Irvine. Dr. Ito is also the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Chair in Digital Media and Learning and directs the research of the UCI Digital Media and Learning Hub, which investigates the ways in which digital technology is changing learning environments, social and civic institutions, and youth culture. She is the author of Engineering Play: A Cultural History of Children’s Software (MIT Press, 2009), and has edited several books, including Fandom Unbound: Otaku Culture in a Connected World (Yale UP, 2012), and Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out: Kids Living and Learning with New Media (MIT Press, 2009).

Pīsim Finds Her Miskanow Book Launch

September 12, 2013

The Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures, in collaboration with The Manitoba Museum and Highwater Press, is pleased to announce the launch of the picture book Pīsim Finds Her Miskanow, which will take place at 7:00PM on Thursday, September 19 at The Manitoba Museum. The launch will include a reading and book signing by author William Dumas, and a reception.

In 1993, the remains of a twenty-five year old Cree woman, who lived 350 years ago, were discovered at South Indian Lake in northern Manitoba.

Now, twenty years after this extraordinary archeological discovery, the woman’s story has been imagined as a children’s book. The story covers a week in the life of Pīsim, a young Cree woman, who lived in the mid 1600s. In the book, created by renowned storyteller William Dumas and illustrated by Leonard Paul, Pīsim comes to terms with her miskanow, or her life’s journey.

The beautifully illustrated children’s book, written at a grade five level, has been a seven year labour of love for its creators, which include Dumas and Paul, as well as representatives of the University of Winnipeg, The Manitoba Museum, and members of the aboriginal community.

"The dream never died," says writer William Dumas. "It started in 1993 and it never ended. It just took a little bit of time to come through," he says with a chuckle.

"When her body was discovered, I was working in Nelson Lake," says Kevin Brownlee, Curator of Archaelogy at The Manitoba Museum. "My boss went up to investigate the found human remains. There was a burial and it looked really important and significant. He knew we had to go back the next year and do a proper recovery. I became one of the first people in 350 years to see her tools."

This remarkable discovery was the impetus for Brownlee’s 1999 publication, Kayasochi Kikawenow, in which he first wrote about the Cree woman. She would very likely have been part of the last generation of native people would have never had any contact with Europeans.

"The whole point of the book is to show the strength of the past and how it strengthens today’s community and helps us move into the future," says William Dumas. "It’s to give youth a sense of identity. People need to know who they are. Ensuring the accuracy of the book demonstrates the importance of Cree culture and heritage to our youth."

"The elders said everything happens for a reason," says Brownlee. "This woman is showing herself to educate the youth because they’re starting to lose touch with their culture and history."

The story is brought to life by the rich imagery of Leonard Paul, and is a primer on Cree culture and history. The sidebars on Cree language and culture, archaeology and history, maps, songs, and more illuminate a healthy and strong culture.

Pīsim lived at an interesting time of immense change. "Things were about to change forever," says Brownlee. "At that time, there was absolutely nothing being traded off of Hudson Bay, it was all coming from the Great Lakes. She likely never saw a European. She would have heard stories about them, but didn’t see one. That whole change gave this story a universal appeal."

"There was such a beautiful array of tools found with her body," adds Brownlee, of what helped the team imagine Pīsim’s compelling life. "The red pipestone beads on her necklace were the furthest north ever found. She had made beads from pin cherries and attached them to her hood. She had a stone woodworking tool and hide scraping tool."

The search for absolute authenticity drove the book’s creators and is partly why the process was so demanding.

"We were so meticulous about being accurate on what we were representing," says Brownlee. "The South Indian Lake area had undergone significant flooding since the 1970s. What did the scenery look like? What did it look like when it was calm? 99.9% of the people will have no idea this is correct. However, the kids of this area will know that this is their home."

Another of the instrumental contributors to this book was Dr. Mavis Reimer. Reimer is Canada Research Chair in Young People’s Texts and Cultures, Professor of English, and Dean of Graduate Studies at the University of Winnipeg, where she founded the Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures (CRYTC).

The project of developing the story and collecting the additional information on Cree language and culture, archaeology and history, maps, and songs included in the book was supervised at CRYTC.

Dumas went to Reimer and proposed that they collaborate on the project. "I did not know at that time how persuasive William Dumas can be nor did I know how compelling was the story that he had to tell," says Reimer.

Reimer is not in the business of publishing children’s books. Her work is to study them, but this project proved too good to resist.

"The moment in the book that makes my skin prickle every time I read it is when Pīsim’s grandmother says to her, ’Come, my child, come and stand beside your responsibility.’" Reimer says her definition of miskanow has broadened as she has worked on the book. She initially understood it to mean career path, but over time, she came to see it more as "a pathway that is discerned for you by the people with whom you are in community."

For Brownlee, who hopes this book will be the first of a series of six books, is as immensely proud of the final result as he is of the process. "I truly believe that I was part of the group selected by this young girl to tell her story. I felt we had to be respectful in telling her story."

Reviews for Pīsim Finds Her Miskanow:

This enchanting book deserves a place in every school and library. It is a beautiful rendition of historical fiction that can give all young people a collective understanding of the power of our history in shaping who we are. Through the collaboration of many, the book has transformed a three hundred year old story of a young girl living on the shores of what is now South Indian Lake into a magical narrative that will enthrall young audiences, and I dare say many older readers as well.
— Hon. Lloyd Axworthy, President & Vice-Chancellor, University of Winnipeg

Pīsim Finds Her Miskanow is an honour song of beauty and life. Through rich story and complex detail, it brings alive the history and language of Asiniskow Ithiniwak in Manitowapow while illustrating the cultural breadth of a dynamic community. This book is a joy to read, teach, and share with my daughter.
— Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Native Studies, University of Manitoba

In imagining the life of a young Cree woman, this volume provides a wonderful evocation of the wisdom and language of Cree elders that seamlessly incorporates archaeology, ethnology, and oral traditions.
— Stephen Loring, Arctic Studies Center, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC

The brilliant teamwork between archaeologists, the Cree, and an accomplished children’s book author gives us . . . a beautifully written and illustrated journey into a centuries-old world . . . [the book] promises to be a classic of Canadian history.
— Brian Fagan, Emeritus Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Barbara, and author of The First North Americans

Pīsim finds her Miskanow . . . is a wonderful bringing together of archeology, anthropology, history, and Cree language to make a story that brings these disciplines to a living place in our hearts and minds. William Dumas has presented Pisim and her family in such a way that their lives will be etched into our memory. The story is complemented by the beautiful and realistic illustrations of Leonard Paul. . . . This book is wonderful!
— Joe McLellan, Author of Nanabosho

Pīsim Finds Her Miskanow Panel Discussion

June 19, 2013

On June 26, the Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures is hosting a panel discussion about the development of Pīsim Finds Her Miskanow, a collaborative picture book about the life of Kayasochi Kikawenow, Our Mother from Long Ago, a young Cree woman who lived in northern Manitoba during the proto-Contact period.

The panel discussion will take place from 7:30PM to 9:00PM in Eckhardt-Gramatté Hall at the University of Winnipeg, and it will feature some of the collaborators, including Kevin Brownlee (Manitoba Museum), William Dumas (Storyteller), Leonard Paul (Illustrator), Deborah Schnitzer (U of Winnipeg), and Mavis Reimer (U of Winnipeg). A reception will follow.

For more information about the history of this project, see CRYTC’s Projects page.

Visual/Verbal Texts Symposium

June 19, 2013

From June 25 to 27, 2013, the Centre for Research in Young PeopleŹ’s Texts and Cultures will host Visual/Verbal Texts, an international symposium which aims to represent and to assess the current state of research in picture books and such adjacent hybrid forms as comics and graphic novels, especially as texts for and about young people.

This symposium has been scheduled on the occasion of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the publication of Perry NodelmanŹ’s Words about Pictures: The Narrative Art of Children’Źs Picture Books by the University of Georgia Press, a book that continues to be widely cited in scholarship.

Please see the symposium program for further details.

"Migrating Multiculturalism: Representing Canadian Multiculturalism to International Audiences" by Mavis Reimer and Doris Wolf

April 8, 2013

Mavis Reimer and Doris Wolf will be giving a presentation entitled "Migrating Multiculturalism: Representing Canadian Multiculturalism to International Audiences" to the UW Youth and Culture Research Cluster on Thursday, April 11 from 12:00 to 1:30 in 1L06.

Countries around the globe often hold up Canadian multiculturalism as an achievement to be emulated. Within the Canadian academy, however, multiculturalism has been subjected to thoroughgoing critiques and we tend to be highly skeptical about the successes of multiculturalism. What happens when we are invited to participate as scholars in discussions of multiculturalism in international contexts because of Canada’s reputation in this area? Please join us in a conversation about presenting and representing Canadian multicultural young people’s texts in contexts beyond Canada.

See poster here: http://crytc.uwinnipeg.ca/pdf/Migrating_Multiculturalism_Flyer.pdf

All are welcome to attend.

CFP - Special Issue of Jeunesse: Consumption

April 4, 2013

Jeunesse Special Issue CFP Consumption

Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures invites essay submissions for a special issue addressing the many interpretations of consumption and their meanings in relation to youth texts and culture(s). We welcome essays that consider registers of race, class, gender, and disability. Essays should be between 6,000 and 9,000 words in length and prepared for blind peer-review.

Consumption is a vehicle through which we come to understand proprietary relationships with people, places, bodies, and identities. If food is the primary signifier when we think of consumption, how might we read metaphoric consumption (of capital, culture, and place, for instance) in light of notions of necessity and survival?

Submissions are requested by: 15 December 2013.

Topics may include:

  • representations of food or the ingestion of food and drink
  • eating disorders, the stigma of obesity, and fatphobia
  • pedagogy of health
  • consumption as disease (ie. tuberculosis)
  • obsession or fixation
  • symbolic acts of devouring/being devoured
  • cannibalism or consuming the self (eg. vampires, fairy tales)
  • consumption, purchasing, ownership, and material culture
  • discourses of consumption (good/bad consumers)
  • young people as consumers, advertising for or about young people
  • cultural consumerism/tourism

Inquiries may be directed to Larissa Wodtke, Managing Editor: l.wodtke@uwinnipeg.ca

Further information about submission guidelines is available at: http://jeunessejournal.ca.

Download a PDF of the CFP.

2013 David Almond Fellows

March 15, 2013

ANNOUNCEMENT: 2013 David Almond Fellows

Seven Stories, National Centre for Children’s Books and the Children’s Literature Unit (CLU) in Newcastle University’s School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics are pleased to announce details of the three 2013 Fellows. Normally only two Fellowships are awarded each year but the field was so strong extraordinary measures were taken to enable three scholars to visit Newcastle and work in the Seven Stories collections. During their time in Newcastle David Almond Fellows also have the opportunity to discuss their work with staff and students in the Children’s Literature Unit (http://www.ncl.ac.uk/elll/about/childrensliterature/) and to meet David Almond.

A key aim of the Fellowships is to focus attention on the breadth and quality of the Seven Stories collections; applications are judged both on the merit of projects and their ability to make full use of the Seven Stories collections (http://collection.sevenstories.org.uk/home/). This year’s applicants proposed a number of exciting projects, some based around individual archives - such as those of the dramatist David Wood – and others tracing developments across multiple collections. The three successful applicants were:

Gili Bar-Hillel, an Israeli critic, editor, translator, journalist and postgraduate student at the University of Tel Aviv, who will be working on a biography of the late Diana Wynne Jones. Wynne Jones deposited her archives at Seven Stories shortly before her death and these will also be at the centre of a conference, jointly organised by Seven Stories and the CLU in 2014.

Dr. Naomi Hamer, University of Winnipeg, will be using Seven Stories’ extensive picturebook collections to look at transmedia storytelling. The project will map the creative and collaborative processes of writers and illustrators, looking at the paratextual dimension of the finished books. There is also an applied dimension to this project which considers the relationship between transmedia texts, picturebooks, new literacies and pedagogy.

Professor Michael Levy, University of Wisconsin, is working on a critical study of David Almond. Professor Levy is an Almond specialist who also has expertise in juvenile fantasy fiction. He will be looking at the extensive Almond holdings in Seven Stories which itself is set not just in the heart of "Almond country" but also has very close ties with his work. The archives are based in Felling, Gateshead where David Almond grew up, and the visitor centre is in the Ouseburn Valley, setting for Heaven Eyes.

The next round of David Almond Fellowships will be announced in November 2013.

Celebrating the work of Dr. Jack Thiessen: Dee Erläwnisse von Alice em Wundalaund

March 13, 2013

Celebrating the work of Dr. Jack Thiessen

Dee Erläwnisse von Alice em Wundalaund: A Low German Translation of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

April 4, 2013, 7:00PM
Room 2M70 (second floor Manitoba Hall)
University of Winnipeg

Program:

Welcome: Royden Loewen
Introductions: Mavis Reimer and A. Ross McCormack
A Reading and Comments by Dr. Thiessen
Response by Dr. Al Reimer, author of My Harp is Turned to Mourning
Reception in honour of Dr. Thiessen

Sponsored by the Chair in Mennonite Studies, the Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures, and the D.F. Plett Historical Research Foundation

Call for Canada Research Chair in Children, Youth and Global Development

March 12, 2013

The Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) at Dalhousie University invites applications for a Tier I Canada Research Chair on "Children, Youth and Global Development." The appointment will be at the rank of Professor and will be conditional on the successful applicant being approved as a Tier 1 Research Chair by the CRC secretariat, with an anticipated start date of 1 July 2014. The position is open with regard to disciplinary specialization, with a primary appointment in one of the Faculty’s Departments (Classics, English, French, German, History, International Development Studies, Music, Philosophy, Political Science, Russian Studies, Sociology and Social Anthropology, Spanish and Latin American Studies or Theatre). A research emphasis on the area of children, youth and conflict would be an asset. Dalhousie University has growing strength in the broad area of "Children and Youth in Challenging Contexts," including researchers in the School of Social Work and the Faculty of Medicine as well as FASS. This strength is reflected, for example, in a new Network Centres of Excellence Knowledge Mobilization grant on Children in Challenging Contexts and the Centre for Foreign Policy Studies Child Soldiers/Conflict Affected Youth initiatives. The successful candidate will be expected to sustain a strong research program of their own, and in so doing actively contribute to intra- and inter-faculty collaborations in this area of emphasis.

Candidates must have a PhD, an outstanding research profile, and an innovative and original research programme; a strong track-record of obtaining external funding; and the ability to work co-operatively, provide leadership in an interdisciplinary environment, develop multi-faceted research projects, and work with graduate students and/or post-doctoral fellows. Although this is primarily a research appointment, the appointee will be expected to teach at the graduate and undergraduate level.

The Canada Research Chairs (CRC) Programme has been established by the Government of Canada to enable Canadian universities to foster research excellence and enhance their role as world-class centres of research excellence. More information about the Canada Research Chairs Programme is available at: http://www.chairs.gc.ca. Please note that the CRC nominations are subject to review and final approval by the CRC Secretariat.

Dalhousie is the leading graduate and research university of Atlantic Canada, with more than 17,000 students from over 100 countries (more than 3500 in graduate programmes). It is located in Halifax – the major centre in the scenic Atlantic region and a city widely known for its high quality of life. Further information about the Faculty and the university can be obtained at http://www.dal.ca/fass. Dalhousie University is an Employment Equity/Affirmative Action employer. The University encourages applications from qualified Aboriginal people, persons with a disability, racially visible persons and women. Applications should include a detailed curriculum vitae, a two-page summary of the candidate’s proposed research programme, a statement of research and teaching interests and philosophies, and three confidential letters of reference forwarded by the referees. All application materials should be sent in hard copy.

Deadline: 1 April 2013

Chair, CRC Tier 1 Appointments Committee
Office of the Dean
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Dalhousie University
6135 University Avenue, Suite 3030
PO BOX 15000
Halifax, NS, B3H 4R2
Fassdean@dal.ca

ARCYP Program at 2013 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences

March 5, 2013

Assocation for Research in Cultures of Young People
CONGRESS PROGRAM
June 4, 2013
University of Victoria

9:00 – 10:15 a.m. - "Growing up Global": Childhoods in a Transnational Context

Chair: Natalie Coulter, (Department of Communication Studies, York University)

  • Chiu, Hsin-fu, (Department of Applied Linguistics, UCLA) "Language, Interaction, and Social Identity in the Chinese Diasporic Speech Community"
  • A. Clotilde Houchon, (Department of Educational and Environmental Psychology, University of Utah). "Disguised as Dick Tracy: Comics, Safe House, and Transmigrant Youth"
  • Rachel Winslow, (Department of Sociology and History, Westmont College). "’Citizens of the World’? Debates over Childhood and Citizenship in the Wake of Operation Babylift"

10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. - Genderqueer Children and Youth

Chair: Naomi Hamer, (Department of English, University of Winnipeg)

  • Rob Bittner, (Department of Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies, SFU). "’I Can See Me!’: Emerging Genders in Literature for Young People"
  • Natasha Hurley, (Department of English and Film Studies, University of Alberta). "The Further Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Imagining GenderQueer Youth and Transgender History"
  • Derritt Mason, (Department of English and Film Studies, University of Alberta). "Adolescence is a Drag: Narrating the Teen Queen in Young Adult Fiction"

12:15 – 1:30 p.m. – ARCYP AGM and LUNCH

2:00 – 3:40 p.m. – Institutional Spaces, Geographies, and Environments of Young People

Chair: Peter Cumming, (Coordinator, Children’s Studies Program in the Department of Humanities, York University)

  • Katherine Fincham-Louis, (Department of Languages and Literature, University of Nicosia, Cyprus) "’Sometimes I don’t want to be English’: Greek English-Speaking Children in State Elementary Schools in the Republic of Cyprus Report on Issues of Identity"
  • Elizabeth J. Meyer, (Google-CSU Digital Ambassador and Assistant Professor, Shool of Education, California Polytechnic University), Annie Pullen Sansfaçon, (School of Social Work, Université de Montréal), Audrey-Anne Dumais-Michaud, (Université de Montréal), Marie-Joëlle, (Université de Montréal), Kimberley Manning, (Department of Political Science, Concordia University), and Jake Pyne, (Ryerson University). "Reframing the problem: Using Social Action Research to support gender creative and transgender youth"
  • Naomi Hamer, (Department of English, University of Winnipeg). "The Eric Carle Picture Book Museum (USA) and Seven Stories: The National Centre for Children’s Books (UK): Redesigning the interactive spaces of the children’s museum for the literacy education of young people"

4:00 – 5:30 p.m. – ROUNDTABLE (OPEN SESSION): Dis-Orders: Intersections between Critical Disability Studies and Youth Studies

Chair: Louise Saldanha (Department of Arts and Education, Grand Prairie Regional College)

A roundtable redressing a lack of sustained critical attention between critical disability and youth studies. Roundtable participants will include:

  • Brenda LeFrancois, School of Social Work and Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland
  • Laurence Parent, Department of the Humanities, Concordia University
  • Kim Sawchuck, Chair in Mobile Media Studies and Professor, Department of Communication Studies, Concordia University
  • Esther Ignagni, School of Disability Studies, Ryerson University

7:00 – 10:00 p.m. – ARCYP Annual Dinner and Drinks

All members, participants, and attendees are welcome!

Please visit our Facebook page, http://facebook.com/arcyp.ca for more information.

Children, Sport, and Film Screening and Panel Discussion

February 6, 2013

On Friday, February 8, CRYTC’s Naomi Hamer will be participating in a panel discussion about children, sport, and film following a free screening of Cristiano’s Shirt (2011), 41 Days (2012), and The Game Must Go On (2010). The screening will begin at 2:30PM in Room E3-262, Senate Chamber in the Engineering Building at the University of Manitoba.

See http://www.sportfilmfestival.ca/?p=830 for further details.

2013 David Almond Fellowships in Children‘s Literature

November 28, 2012

DAVID ALMOND FELLOWSHIPS FOR RESEARCH IN CHILDREN’S LITERATURE 2013

Newcastle University’s School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics and Seven Stories, National Centre for Children’s Books are pleased to announce that the application process for 2013 David Almond Fellowships is now open.

Further particulars

The awards recognise both David Almond’s contribution to children’s literature and his connections with these partner institutions: he is a patron of Seven Stories and an honorary graduate of Newcastle University.

The Fellowships aim to promote high-quality research in the Seven Stories collections that will call attention to their breadth and scholarly potential. The two awards of Ł300 each are to facilitate a research visit to the Seven Stories collections in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK of at least three days by a bona fide researcher working on a relevant project. Applications will be considered from candidates in any academic discipline. The successful applicants will have a clearly defined project that will benefit from having access to the Seven Stories collections. All applicants should consult the Seven Stories catalogue as part of preparing their applications: http://www.sevenstories.org.uk/collection/. A well-developed dissemination strategy will be an advantage. Priority will be given to the importance of the project and best use of the Seven Stories collections as judged by a senior member of the Children’s Literature Unit in the School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics at Newcastle University and a senior member of the Collections team at Seven Stories.

Eligibility and applications

Applications are being accepted until 1 February, 2013. For more details on eligibility and how to apply, please see the attached, or go to http://www.ncl.ac.uk/elll/about/childrensliterature/dafellowships.htm.

Call for Papers - The Film Cultures of Young People: Producers / Consumers / Representations

November 27, 2012

CALL FOR PAPERS
The Film Cultures of Young People: Producers / Consumers / Representations
ASSOCIATION FOR RESEARCH IN CULTURES OF YOUNG PEOPLE (ARCYP): RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM
JANUARY 25, 2013

CALL FOR BRIEF PAPER PROPOSALS

The Association for Research in Cultures of Young People (ARCYP) and the School of Communication at Simon Fraser University will co-present a symposium on new research on the film cultures of young people.

The symposium will consist of two panels/roundtables and open discussion on new and emerging research on the film cultures of young people. ARCYP Members and other faculty or students are invited to send a TITLE and a 250-word statement describing their proposed 15-20-minute presentation to the symposium organizer in an e-mail message to admin@arcyp.ca no later than December 20, 2012. Questions or concerns may be directed to Dr. Naomi Hamer (Symposium Coordinator – n.hamer@uwinnipeg.ca) or Dr. Stuart Poyntz (President, ARCYP – spoyntz@sfu.ca).

Description

This symposium seeks to present new and emerging research that addresses the cultures of production, consumption, and representation related to films produced explicitly for young people; films produced by (or in collaboration with) young people themselves; and the representations of young people in films intended for adult audiences. These interrelated film cultures are significant to the cultivation and articulation of cultural discourse, and continue to play an important but changing role in the context of interactive, digital, and mobile technologies. Presenters may apply a range of critical and interdisciplinary approaches from the areas of film studies, children’s film criticism, film history, semiotics, visual culture, media and literacy education, audience studies, among other cross-disciplinary frames and approaches.

More generally, we are interested in:

  • Critical approaches to films/vidoes for, about and by young people from interdisciplinary and/or cross-disciplinary theoretical and methodological perspectives and frameworks
  • Research and analyses from both theoretical and practitioner-oriented perspectives
  • Research that examines film/video cultures of young people from various sites of cultural production and consumption

Topics for the symposium may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Global circulation, adaptation, translation (linguistic, national, cultural) and distribution of films for/about/by young people
  • Research that critically examines issues of gender, race, sexuality, and socio-economic class, disability, and discourses of identity in relation to film cultures
  • The political and cultural economies of film for young people including examinations of film industry and film policy (e.g. rating systems in North America and internationally)
  • Cross-media adaptations, translations and other revisions or transformations of popular children’s books, fairytales and folktales in film cultures of young people
  • The role of merchandise, product placement, commercial culture in film cultures
  • Audience reception and ethnographic studies of young people as film audiences
  • The role of young people as film/video producers and collaborative producers
  • Film, video and machinima production in primary/secondary/undergraduate education; extracurricular media literacy education in non-school settings; the pedagogic role of film, video and machinima as part of media, literature, and cross-curricular education
  • The role of digital, interactive and mobile technologies in the film/video cultures of young people
  • Research on fandom (fanvids/fanfic/cosplay etc.) around films/videos for young people

Call for Nominations for the 14th Annual International Brothers Grimm Award

November 12, 2012

NOMINATION DEADLINE: November 15, 2012

The International Brothers Grimm Award for researchers of children’s literature was established in 1986 under the auspices of the International Institute for Children’s Literature, Osaka and the Kinran-kai Foundation, in order to promote steady and sound research into children’s literature. To encourage people who engage in the study of children’s literature, the award is given to those who have performed outstanding work in research into children’s literature and or picture books, or those who have contributed remarkably to the promotion of such research.

The award will be given to an individual, not to an organization. The recipient will be decided by the selection committee from among candidates nominated by specialists all over the world.

The award recipient will receive a commemorative trophy and Ą1,000,000. He/she will also be invited to the Award Presentation Ceremony, which will be held at IICLO in the autumn of 2013. Traveling expenses will be paid for by the host organization.

To nominate someone, please send the following information to info@iiclo.or.jp:

  • Nominee’s name
  • Nominee’s email and mailing addresses (if known)
  • Nominee’s organization
  • Reasons for recommending this candidate
  • Your name
  • Your address
  • Your email address

Or, you could send your nomination by surface mail:
International Institute for Children’s Literature, Osaka
Osaka Prefectural Central Library, 1-2-1, Aramoto-kita,
Higashi Osaka-shi,br /> 577-0011, Japan

Or, you could send it by FAX: +81-6-6744-0582

American Alliance for Theatre and Education Research Award

November 5, 2012

THE AMERICAN ALLIANCE FOR THEATRE AND EDUCATION invites submissions for the 2013 AATE RESEARCH AWARDS:

THE RESEARCH AWARD
THE DISTINGUISHED DISSERTATION AWARD
THE DISTINGUISHED THESIS AWARD

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 30, 2012

AATE’s research awards are offered annually to scholars whose research contributes significantly to the field of drama/theatre with or for young people. We welcome submissions from a wide variety of research traditions that explore any topic related to drama / theatre education or theatre for young audiences.

Eligibility

  • Any AATE member may submit their work for review. Non-members may submit if sponsored by a member, but must become members if their work is advanced to the final round of review.
  • Theses and dissertations may be entered up to four years from their date of completion (This year, studies completed between November 2008-November 2012 are eligible for submission).

Submission

Authors should submit the following materials to the Research Awards Chair by e-mail:

  • A cover page indicating the author’s name, affiliation, address, phone number, e-mail address, study title and (for theses/dissertation) the name and contact information of the committee chairperson
  • A 1,200-1,500 word abstract of the master’s thesis, doctoral dissertation, or research report, accompanied by a 2-page representative bibliography. The abstract must NOT include any identifying information related to the author or her/his university affiliation.
  • For theses and dissertations: a letter from the chairperson of the student’s committee recommending the study for consideration.

Each of the above should be attached as separate files to a single message and e-mailed to matt.omasta@usu.edu

Only electronic submissions in MS Word (.doc or .docx) or PDF format will be accepted.

Review Timeline

  • All submissions must be received by 11:59pm PST on November 30, 2012.
  • Authors be notified by January 22, 2013 as to if their submission will be advanced to Round II of the review process. Authors whose work is advanced will be asked to submit an electronic copy of their entire completed thesis / dissertation / research report by 11:59pm PST on January 29, 2013.
  • Finalists will be notified of award decisions by May 15, 2013. Award winners and authors receiving honorable mentions will be invited to share and celebrate their research at the annual AATE conference in Washington, DC July 25-28, 2013, and will be invited to submit an article based on their research to the Youth Theatre Journal for potential publication.

Send all electronic submissions and requests for further information to:

Matt Omasta, PhD
AATE Research Awards Chair
matt.omasta@usu.edu

Panel Discussion to Honour Elisabeth Young-Bruehl in Toronto

November 2, 2012

The sudden death of Elisabeth Young-Bruehl on December 1, 2011 at age 65 near her home in Toronto has saddened us all immensely. Young-Bruehl wrote fifteen books, and her work as a biographer and psychoanalyst has been enormously influential, touching many lives and shaping the disciplines she worked in. In January 2012 her long-awaited book Childism: Confronting Prejudice Against Children was published.

This December 1, we will honour this great work while remembering Elisabeth with the help of four accomplished panelists: Alison Bechdel, Raffi Cavoukian, Donna Orange, and Dr. Heather Weir.

When: December 1, 2012, Panel Discussion 1:30 - 5:30, followed by a reception.
Where: George Ignatieff Theatre, 15 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON
Cost: $75 (Taxes included)
Registration: Contact Caversham Booksellers at 416-944-0962/1-800-361-6120, or www.cavershambooksellers.com

Alison Bechdel is the author of the bestselling graphic memoir Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic, which won a 2007 Eisner Award, and Are You My Mother?: A Comic Drama, which came out in May to critical acclaim. From 1983 to 2008, she drew the comic strip "Dykes to Watch Out For," which has been collected in several volumes, including The Essential Dykes to Watch Out For.

Raffi Cavoukian is known to millions simply as Raffi: a renowned Canadian songwriter and performer, author and entrepreneur, once called "the most popular children’s entertainer in the western world" (Washington Post). In 1997, Raffi was inspired to develop a holistic philosophy called Child Honouring. The philosophy is outlined in the book Child Honouring: How to Turn This World Around edited by Raffi Cavoukian and psychoanalyst Sharna Olfman, 2006 with a foreword by the Dalai Lama.

Donna Orange is educated in both philosophy and clinical psychology. She also teaches at ISIPSé (Institute for Psychoanalytic Psychology of the Self and Relational Psychoanalysis), Milano and Roma. In New York, she teaches and supervises at IPSS, the Institute for the Psychoanalytic Study of Subjectivity. She is author of Emotional Understanding: Studies in Psychoanalytic Psychology; Thinking for Clinicians: Philosophical Resources for Contemporary Psychoanalysis and the Humanistic Psychotherapies, and The Suffering Stranger: Hermeneutics for Everyday Clinical Practice as well as coauthoring numerous other books.

Heather Weir is a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst in Toronto. She is on the faculty of the Toronto Psychoanalytic Institute, the Advanced Training in Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Program and the Toronto Child Psychoanalytic Program. She is a Child and Adolescent psychiatrist on staff at the Hospital for Sick Children. She is also on staff at the University Health Network, (University of Toronto).

Please contact Vicki Fraser for more information: 416-944-0962; 1-800-361-6120; vicki@cavbk.ca.

Skywalk Panel Discussion - The Princess and the Goblin: The Unexpected Hero

October 16, 2012

On Wednesday, October 17, Dr. Pauline Greenhill, Dr. Mavis Reimer, and Dr. Catherine Tosenberger from the University of Winnipeg and Judy Slivinski from the Royal Winnipeg Ballet will participate in a panel discussion called The Princess and the Goblin: The Unexpected Hero. It will take place from 12:10PM to 12:50PM in the Carol Shields Auditorium (2nd floor, Millennium Library, 251 Donald Street). This discussion is part of the Skywalk Lecture Series, and it precedes the Royal Winnipeg Ballet’s production of The Princess & The Goblin, choreographer Twyla Tharp’s adaptation of George MacDonald’s book, which will run from October 17 to 21 at the Centennial Concert Hall.

Topics to be discussed:

  • Inversion of fairy tale, including the lack of parenting by King Papa, and the presence of a female hero, who is also a child
  • The implications of George McDonald creating a female hero in the Victorian Era
  • The roles of the King (Parents), the Princess (Children) and the Goblins (Street People) and their parallels to current roles and/or perceptions in society
  • Twyla Tharp and Rachel Browne countering the male-dominated dance world

The Princess & The Goblin Pre-Show Chats

Mavis Reimer will also be doing pre-show chats thirty minutes prior to the ballet performances on Thursday, October 18 and Saturday, October 20. These presentations will take place in the Centennial Concert Hall South Wing, and admission is free.

Background information:

For information about Twyla Tharp’s take on the book and its adaptation to ballet, please see the latest Winnipeg Free Press article: http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/arts-and-life/entertainment/arts/regrets-shes-had-but-one-173650531.html.

An electronic version of George MacDonald’s book, The Princess and the Goblin, is available online at http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/34339.

Every Teacher Project Launch

October 3, 2012

The Every Teacher project is set to launch at Convocation Hall (2nd floor of Wesley Hall), University of Winnipeg, on October 11 at 11:00AM.

The Every Teacher project is a national study designed to identify and make widely available the collective expertise that exists among Canadian teachers on inclusive education practices for sexual and gender minority students. This study will enable us to learn what educators think about the climate of Canada’s schools for LGBTQ students; which approaches to inclusion of these students seem to work, and in what contexts, and which don’t; what supports educators in doing this work, and what holds us back.

Every teacher organization in English Canada has enthusiastically agreed to support this project. These include the Canadian Teachers’ Federation, Yukon Teachers’ Association, Northwest Territories Teachers’ Association, Nunavut Teachers’ Association, British Columbia Teachers’ Federation, Alberta Teachers’ Association, Saskatchewan Teachers’ Federation, Manitoba Teachers’ Society, Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario, Ontario English Catholic Teachers’ Association, Ontario Secondary School Teachers’ Federation, Ontario Teachers’ Federation, Quebec Provincial Association of Teachers, New Brunswick Teachers’ Association, Nova Scotia Teachers’ Union, Prince Edward Island Teachers’ Federation, and Newfoundland and Labrador Teachers’ Association. We are very excited to see this clear evidence of teachers across the country moving strongly to improve school climate for LGBTQ students.

The project is headed by Dr. Catherine Taylor at The University of Winnipeg in partnership with The Manitoba Teachers’ Society. Catherine also served as lead researcher in partnership with Egale Canada Human Rights Trust for the First National Climate Survey on Homophobia and Transphobia in Canadian Schools. The Every Teacher project is funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

Perry Nodelman Lecture at Trinity College Dublin

October 1, 2012

On October 30, 2012, Dr. Perry Nodelman, Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Winnipeg, will be doing a lecture entitled "‘Clever Enough to Do Variations’: Maurice Sendak as Visual Musician" at Trinity College Dublin. It will take place at 10:00AM in the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Long Room Hub. The lecture will be chaired by Valerie Coghlan, President of Bookbird: an International Journal of Children’s Literature. All are welcome.

Perry Nodelman is the author of Words About Pictures: the Narrative Art of Children’s Picture Books (which celebrates twenty-five years in print in 2013), The Pleasures of Children’s Literature (third edition in collaboration with Mavis Reimer), and The Hidden Adult: Defining Children’s Literature (Johns Hopkins UP, 2008). He has also published about 125 essays on various aspects of children’s literature in academic journals and books, the first published in 1977, the latest in 2012. As a writer for young people, he has published four novels on his own and seven in collaboration with Carol Matas.

Panel Discussion on Solidarity Rock

September 28, 2012

UWinnipeg’s Oral History Centre in the Faculty of Arts invites all to attend a panel discussion (with videos) on the history of the DIY punk-rock movement in Cuba and the story of Solidarity Rock, its cultural and unifying impact and message. The panel discussion will be led by members of Trinidad, Cuba punk band Arrabio and Solidarity Rock representatives William Garcia and Drew McIntosh.

The event will take place on Thursday, October 25 from 4:00 - 5:30 p.m. in Room 2B23, Bryce Hall on the UWinnipeg campus. Coffee and light refreshments will be provided.

Since 2008, Solidarity Rock — an artist-run organization working with musicians, artists and creative people in Cuba, Canada and beyond — has been working to collect instruments and musical equipment to help the Cuban rock bands find their own way through music. This cross cultural group has managed to overcome social, political and economic barriers in order to build a unifying musical movement across the globe.

Special issue of Papers: Explorations into Children’s Literature on Children’s Literature Collections and Archives

September 27, 2012

A special issue of Papers: Explorations into Children’s Literature on Children’s Literature Collections and Archives is out now.

This issue is available (free open access) at: http://www.paperschildlit.com/index.php/papers.

Table of Contents

  • The Osborne Collection of Early Children’s Books: Toronto Public Library’s Research Collection of Juvenile Material Leslie Anne McGrath
  • Twentieth century literary and publishing archives: UK research perspectives on children’s literature Charlotte Berry
  • Colonial Girls’ Literature and the Politics of Archives in the Digital Age Michelle J. Smith and Kristine Moruzi
  • Anthony Arrowroot and Nutty Nutella: Advertising in Children’s Literature Afsana Khan
  • The Historical-Cultural Value of the Juvenile Collection: The McLaren Collection at the University of Melbourne and its Girls’ Books Margaret Lowe
  • John Mystery and the Australian Book Trade Juliet O’Conor
  • Astrid Lindgren and the Archives Helene Ehriander
  • A Token to the Future: A Digital "Archive" of Early Australian Children’s Literature Kerry Mallan, Amy Cross, and Cherie Allan
  • Digital Archives and Cultural Memory: Discovering Lost Histories in Digitised Australian Children’s Literature 1851-1945 Michelle Dicinoski
  • The Lu Rees Archives of Australian Children’s Literature Belle Alderman
  • Collections of the Swiss Institute for Children’s and Youth Media and their Public Access Roger Meyer
  • Growing up Australian: The National Imaginary in School Readers Jane McGennisken
  • Books or Toys? A Traveller’s tale: researching early movable books for and by children in material and virtual collections Jacqueline Reid-Walsh

ARCYP Call for Papers - ‘Growing up global’: Childhoods in a Transnational Context

September 25, 2012

CALL FOR PAPERS
‘Growing up global’: Childhoods in a Transnational Context
A JOINT SESSION OF ARCYP AND ACCUTE AT THE CONGRESS OF THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA, VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA
JUNE 1-8, 2013
DEADLINE: November 1, 2012

As people and institutions connect across the borders of nation-states, children are invariably part of the processes of transnationalism. Yet their presence has largely been ignored by much of the scholarship on transnationalism. While they may lack the abilities to fully articulate and engage with the social, political, and economic forces behind transnational movement and circulation, young people are just as affected by - and central to - these global currents. Thinking about childhood in a transnational context requires a greater awareness of how contemporary global culture is creating a unique experience of childhood itself, both ‘of’ childhood, and ‘for’ children themselves.

The purpose of this panel is to put children and childhood at the center of discussions concerning transnationalism. We seek papers that investigate the ways in which "the child" both impacts and is impacted by circulation across global borders. We encourage research that questions how children experience transnationality and how we understand the child and childhood in the context of nation states whose borders are not what they once were.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • researching children and childhoods in transnational contexts
  • the experiences of children in the transnational context
  • the relationships between global capital and the transnational child
  • securitization and the transnational child
  • children in transnational families
  • cosmopolitanism and the transnational child
  • transnational migration and the child

Following the instructions under Option # 1 at www.accute.ca/generalcall.html, send your 700-word proposal (or 8-10 page double spaced paper), a Proposal Submissions Information Sheet, and a 100-word abstract and 50-word biographical statement, as three attachments in an email addressed to admin@arcyp.ca by November 1 2012.

NOTES: You must be a current member of ARCYP or ACCUTE to submit to this session. Rejected submissions will not be moved into the general “pool” of ACCUTE submissions.

ARCYP Call for Papers - Institutionalized Spaces, Geographies, and Environments of Young People

September 25, 2012

CALL FOR PAPERS
Institutionalized Spaces, Geographies, and Environments of Young People
A JOINT SESSION OF ARCYP AND ACCUTE AT THE CONGRESS OF THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA, VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA
JUNE 1-8, 2013
DEADLINE: November 1, 2012

This panel invites papers that explore spatial conceptualizations, experiences, and socio-cultural/political histories of young people within and in relation to institutionalized or publically funded/constructed physical or material spaces and environments that have been intentionally designed for young people. Research foci may include (but are not limited to): children’s museums and theatres; public libraries; children’s hospitals and rehabilitation centres, juvenile detention centres, and residential schools; public schools (and the spatial analysis thereof) summer camps, playgrounds and play spaces, and skate parks; and, other institutionalized physical/material spaces and environments allotted to young people.

Possible topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • The politics of private/public discourses of childhood relevant to these spaces;
  • Spatial experiences that result from criminal justice and legal policies around young people;
  • Socio-cultural histories of select institutionalized spaces (i.e. children’s hospitals etc.);
  • Relationships between national/civic/public identities and the allotment of spaces intended for young people in public environments.

We would especially encourage proposals that specifically explore spatially oriented analyses of the institutional contexts foregrounded in this CFP, and strongly encourage work that examines topics from social science perspectives and/or cross-disciplinary work rooted in geography, history, law, criminal justice, indigenous studies and sociology.

Following the instructions under Option # 1 at www.accute.ca/generalcall.html, send your 700-word proposal (or 8-10 page double spaced paper), a Proposal Submissions Information Sheet, and a 100-word abstract and 50-word biographical statement, as three attachments in an email addressed to admin@arcyp.ca by November 1 2012.

NOTES: You must be a current member of ARCYP or ACCUTE to submit to this session. Rejected submissions will not be moved into the general “pool” of ACCUTE submissions.

ARCYP Call for Papers - Genderqueer Children and Youth

September 25, 2012

CALL FOR PAPERS
Genderqueer Children and Youth
A JOINT SESSION OF ARCYP AND ACCUTE AT THE CONGRESS OF THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA, VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA
JUNE 1-8, 2013
DEADLINE: November 1, 2012

Elizabeth J. Meyer defines "genderqueer" as a term that challenges "the existing binaries of how we conceptualize and embody gender. . . . Genderqueer is an identity that has been embraced by individuals who feel that their gender identity does not fit clearly in the man/woman binary." The Gender Equity Resource Center defines "genderqueer" as "a person who redefines or plays with gender, or who refuses gender altogether. A label for people who bend/break the rules of gender and blur the boundaries."

For many genderqueer people their feelings of "gender dysphoria" can be traced to their earliest childhoods. Often children’s intuition of the disjunction between their bodies and their sense of their gendered selves is their very first memory (see Deborah Rudacille). Thinking about expressions and embodiments of gendered identities, it is clear that young people are of central concern to researchers and scholars.

We therefore invite papers about children and youth who are "queering gender" and about representations of and by those young people—including, but not limited to, "genderqueer," "gender non-conforming," "transgender," "gender-gifted," "polygender," "genderless," "gender-bending," and "gender-blending" children and youth. Given that the lived experiences and mediated encounters of genderqueer young people are such a productive space of inquiry, we are interested in all research at the intersections of gender, identity, and childhood, and we encourage proposals from a wide range of academic disciplines.

Following the instructions under Option # 1 at www.accute.ca/generalcall.html, send your 700-word proposal (or 8-10 page double-spaced paper), a Proposal Submissions Information Sheet, and a 100-word abstract and 50-word bio-bibliographical statement, as three attachments to an email addressed to admin@arcyp.ca by November 1, 2012.

NOTES: You must be a current member of ARCYP or ACCUTE to submit to this session. Rejected submissions will not be moved into the general “pool” of ACCUTE submissions.

Gender in Fairy Tale Film and Cinematic Folklore Course

September 25, 2012

The University of Winnipeg’s Department of Women and Gender Studies is offering an online course on Gender in Fairy Tale Film and Cinematic Folklore for the 2013 Winter Term.

Course Number: WGS-3005-761
Course Instructor: Dr. Jennifer Orme
Prerequisites: WGS-1232, WGS-2001, WGS-2002 or ENGL-2114 or permission of the instructor

Fairy tale film (movie or TV versions of international wonder tales) and cinematic folklore (representations of other traditional genres in film) express notions of gender that have multiple implications for their creators and audiences. Using feminist film theory, we explore filmed versions of traditional culture primarily for adults. Topics include postmodern and psychoanalytic perspectives; metamorphosis, enchantment, monstrosity, and abjection; transgender and transbiology; the rise in popularity of adult fairy tale film; analyses of particular auteurs; adaptation theory; genre and generational shifts and remixes; historic and contemporary perspectives on innovative cinematography and special effects, and/or contemporary iconography.

This course features guest lectures by Jack Zipes, Cristina Bacchilega and Sidney Eve Matrix.

For further information or permission to take the course, please contact Dr. Greenhill at p.greenhill@uwinnipeg.ca or 786-9439.

Joel Bakan Talk - Childhood Under Siege: How Big Business Targets Children

September 19, 2012

The Uniter Speaker Series presents Joel Bakan, author, filmmaker, and professor of law at UBC, on September 19 at 7:30PM in Eckhardt-Gramatté Hall. Admission is free.

Joel Bakan, author of the international bestseller The Corporation, and writer of the hit documentary film based upon it, will talk about his new book Childhood Under Siege: How Big Business Targets Children.

Whether the industry is marketing to kids or digital gaming, pharmaceuticals or industrial chemicals, farm labour or K-12 education, a similar dynamic is at work, Bakan argues: children are being neglected, harmed and exploited by large corporations increasingly unrestrained in their pursuit of profit. Change is possible, Bakan suggests, and he offers concrete ideas about how to pursue it.

Presented by The Uniter, the official student newspaper of The University of Winnipeg, The Uniter Speakers Series is part of the newspaper’s ongoing efforts to enhance its contribution to community life on and off campus.

Call for Proposals: Frances E. Russell Grant

September 10, 2012

IBBY Canada Call for Proposals: Frances E. Russell Grant

The Canadian National Section of the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY Canada) is now accepting proposals for the 2012 Frances E. Russell Grant. The $1,000 grant is intended to support IBBY Canada’s mission "to initiate and encourage research in young people’s literature in all its forms" and is given in support of research for a publishable work (a book or a paper) on Canadian children’s literature.

The deadline for proposals, which may be submitted in English or in French, is October 31, 2012.

The grant supports scholarly work only; works of fiction are not eligible. The types of works that are eligible for the 2012 Frances E. Russell Grant include:

  1. Studies of individual authors and their work, especially if considered in their socio-historical context.
  2. Comparative studies of two or more authors, which illuminate their stylistic differences, or consider their social and historical approaches.
  3. Subject/Genre overviews, for example, children’s fantasy or historical fiction.
  4. Biographical studies of Canadian children’s authors or illustrators.
  5. Studies of Canadian children’s illustrators and their work.
  6. Related subjects including contemporary theoretical approaches to the study of Canadian children’s literature.

The following materials are required: a proposal, a curriculum vitae, a synopsis of methods and stages by which the applicant will pursue the research, and a summary of what the funds are to be used for. The competition is open to Canadian citizens or landed immigrants. Please send proposals as e-mail attachments to: Deirdre Baker, Frances E. Russell Grant Chair, at russell@ibby-canada.org.

If candidates prefer not to use e-mail, proposals can be mailed to:

IBBY Canada
c/o The Canadian Children’s Book Centre
Suite 217, 40 Orchard View Blvd.
Toronto, ON M4R 1B9
Attention: Deirdre Baker, Frances E. Russell Grant Chair

A jury, appointed by IBBY Canada, will select the successful applicant by December 31, 2012.

ABOUT IBBY AND THE FRANCES E. RUSSELL GRANT

The Frances E. Russell Grant was established by the late Marjorie Russell in memory of her sister, a long time supporter of IBBY Canada. Past winners include Vivian Howard, Gail Edwards and Judith Saltman, Michelle Mulder, André Gagnon, Ronald Jobe, Carole Carpenter, Linda Granfield, and Françoise Lepage. For more information about the Frances E. Russell Grant, please visit the IBBY Canada web site at www.ibby-canada.org or write to info@ibby-canada.org.

AHRC Research Studentship - Children’s Media in the Arab World

August 21, 2012

The University of Westminster invites applications for a full-time three-year AHRC-funded PhD studentship exploring Definitions of Childhood in the Arab World and their Implications for Screen-Based Media, starting in January 2013 within the University’s Arab Media Centre.

Three years, full time Ł16,000 annual stipend plus fee waiver.

The PhD is linked to a three year AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council) study on Orientations in the Development of Pan-Arab Television by Children, led by Professor Naomi Sakr, Professor Jeanette Steemers, and Dr. Tarik Sabry, which starts in January 2013. As part of their studies the doctoral student will be expected to provide some assistance to the research team on tasks that relate directly to the student’s research topic (including literature reviews, document summaries, television programme analysis and the transcription and analysis of research data).

Successful candidates must be able to read and speak Arabic to a competent level. We particularly welcome candidates with a strong interest in children’s media or media industries more generally, but are also interested in candidates who are knowledgeable about Arab history, politics and culture.

The PhD will be suitable for candidates with a good first degree in the social sciences or arts and humanities (2.1 or better). Candidates would normally be expected to have a Masters degree in a related area, with experience in research methods at that level, but we will also consider candidates with an excellent first degree.

To be eligible candidates must have a relevant connection with the UK, normally consisting of a minimum of three years UK residence for purposes other than education.

The studentship will be located within the Communication and Media Research Institute (CAMRI) at the University of Westminster - the UK’s number one research group in media and communication as rated by the UK Government’s 2008 Research Assessment Exercise.

The Studentship consists of a fee waiver and a stipend of Ł16,000 per annum. Successful candidates will be expected to undertake some teaching duties.

Prospective candidates wishing to informally discuss an application should contact Professor Naomi Sakr, N.Sakr01@westminster.ac.uk.

For application details go to http://tinyurl.com/bskp9cx.

This studentship is funded by the AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council). For further information, please visit www.ahrc.ac.uk/FundingOpportunities/Pages/bgpcb.aspx.

The closing date for applications is 5pm, Friday, 5 October 2012.

Storytime Installation at Gallery 1C03

July 23, 2012

Storytime: Glen Johnson & Leslie Supnet (September 6 – October 6, 2012)

Storytime is an exciting new collaborative multi-media installation by Winnipeg artists Glen Johnson and Leslie Supnet which will be shown in Gallery 1C03. In total, this project has four distinct components: 1) an exhibition that pairs Supnet’s drawings alongside Johnson’s stories and a short animated film by Supnet which is narrated by Johnson; 2) an accompanying full-colour illustrated publication containing the drawings/stories with a critical essay on the project by Winnipeg-based writer Tom Kohut [pending funding]; 3) two public performances by Johnson; 4) a public artist talk by Supnet.

Storytime represents the very first collaboration between Supnet, a visual artist and animator, and Johnson, a writer and performance artist. The pieces presented in this exhibition are entirely new. As the two artists became acquainted with one another’s work over the last few years, they realized that they share a certain overlapping sensibility. Both artists are interested in the tradition of illustrated stories and are drawn to a certain kind of anthropomorphism in their work, perhaps best exemplified by the work of Beatrix Potter or Thornton W. Burgess and Harrison Cady. Emphasizing the collaborative nature of their work from conception, neither of the artists wanted the project to be solely a matter of Supnet illustrating Johnson’s stories. Supnet began to work on drawings that were inspired by existing stories but she also gave sketches to Johnson for which he subsequently wrote new stories. A story might inspire a drawing that necessitated rewriting the story or a drawing that inspired a story might have to be altered to fit the new story. By continuing this back and forth process over a lengthy period of time the two will produce a body of richly layered drawing and story pairs.

The exhibition in Gallery 1C03 will include a selection of 15 – 20 of these paired drawings and stories, each presented in the format of a bound hardcover children’s book. The books will be placed on small low tables, encircled with chairs. These furniture groupings, spread throughout the front two-thirds of the gallery, will resemble the reading area of a bookstore, library or classroom. This installation will allow gallery visitors to sit at the tables and handle the "books," thus engaging with the works as they would illustrated children’s books.

Two to three new short animated films, collaboratively created by Johnson and Supnet, will be presented as part of an installation in the back third of Gallery 1C03. The films will be screened on what will appear as an old style cabinet television. In order to ensure image and sound quality, however, the screen will actually be a flat panel monitor mounted inside an old tv cabinet. The television will be placed within a small living room setting. There, seated on a vintage-style couch, gallery visitors will be able to watch the short films as they would have watched cartoons in their childhood homes. In addition to the living room area with the television, there will be an oversized chair with an end table and a lamp to serve as the setting for Johnson’s performative story readings.

Johnson’s performances will be part of his ongoing "Uncle Glennie" story reading practice. Begun at Gallery 803 in 2006, the series attempts to replicate the experience of a children’s story time with Johnson reading selections from his storybook. While Johnson’s readings are modeled on children’s story times, the character of his stories is by no means juvenile. Although the stories are rarely overtly adult or inappropriate in tone or content, the themes and the manner in which these themes are handled are not tailored for young audiences. When "Uncle Glennie" is not performing, his book of stories will be left on the table by his chair for visitors to peruse.

Supnet’s drawings and short animated films, like Johnson’s stories and readings, appear child-friendly on the surface but they often deal with dark subject matter in a subtle and adult-oriented way. In her words, the images reference "identity, isolation, longing and despair, all with a touch of whimsy and the surreal." She is interested in using her drawing "as a mechanism to cope with the little tragedies we all face day to day." Each work possesses a strong and instantly recognizable sentiment, including her distinct brand of melancholy and an edge of irony. She hopes to "invoke a sense of childhood wonder, and inspire playfulness in the lives of the viewers."

Storytime has been planned to open in early September during the University’s first week of classes and Student Orientation Week. The exhibition will be promoted as part of O-Week, with the first of Johnson’s performances taking place in partnership with these celebrations and sponsored by the University’s Student Association.

Significantly, Johnson and Supnet are University of Winnipeg alumni and their exhibition will also open as part of the University’s 2012 Homecoming celebrations.

Johnson’s second performance will take place as part of Culture Days, again allowing new audiences to be exposed to both contemporary performance as well as Gallery 1C03’s programming. His performance will be recorded and an audio podcast of it will be posted on the gallery’s website and blog for those who were unable to attend the event in person.

Call for Papers for 21st IRSCL Congress: Children’s Literature and Media Cultures

July 3, 2012

The 21st biennial conference of the International Research Society for Children’s Literature on Children’s Literature and Media Cultures will be hosted by the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Maastricht University, The Netherlands.

Conference Convenor: Lies Wesseling
Conference dates: August 10-14, 2013

Conference theme:

Contemporary children and adolescents divide their time over many different media. These media do not develop in isolation. Rather, they shape each other by continually exchanging content and modes of mediation. This conference addresses the exchanges between children’s literature and adjacent media (oral narrative, theatre, film, radio, TV, digital media).

Media are best defined as cultural practices that forge specific links between senders and receivers of messages, facilitating certain types of communicative behavior. As newer media tend to imitate, if not absorb, older media, they force older media to reassert their uniqueness and indispensability in a rapidly changing media landscape. How has children’s literature staked out its own niche in these historically variable "mediascapes" in the course of time? How do electronic and digital media affect children’s emergent literacy and literary competence? How have children’s books and the newer electronic and digital media impacted on children’s play? What sort of communicative behaviors are facilitated by the diverse media available to children and adolescents nowadays? Which ethical and political issues are raised by the fact that children’s literature has to share its claim to the audience’s attention with a whole gamut of alternative media? These questions are central to the 21st biannual conference of the IRSCL.

The aim of the conference is to strengthen the ever closer ties between children’s literature scholars and media experts, and to bridge the gap between hermeneutic methods from the humanities and empirical, experimental methods from the social sciences.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers: Adriana Bus, Gudrun Marci-Boehncke, Jackie Marsh, Kerry Mallan, Junko Yokota

For further information about the conference, the call for papers, and the submission of abstracts, go to: www.irscl2013.com.

Subversive Fairy Tale Films Seminar with Jack Zipes

June 12, 2012

Special Visiting Scholar Seminar
Jack Zipes, Professor Emeritus, University of Minnesota
Friday, July 20, 2012
9:30AM to 12:30PM
University of Winnipeg, Room 2M70

Subversive Fairy Tale Films (co-sponsored by Women’s and Gender Studies, University of Winnipeg and the Winnipeg Art Gallery)

Jack Zipes, world-renowned expert on fairy tales and author of The Enchanted Screen: The Unknown History of Fairy-Tale Films (Routledge, 2011) will screen three experimental feminist fairy-tale films that counter the dumbed-down Hollywood versions of fairy tales. The films will be followed by a seminar discussion led by Dr. Zipes.

You must register for this special seminar, which will run ONLY if we get sufficient numbers. To register, send an e mail to l.fauzi@uwinnipeg.ca by noon July 6.

"Mapping Arabic Children’s Literature Studies" - A Lecture by Dr. Sabah Aisawi

June 12, 2012

CRYTC is pleased to present "Mapping Arabic Children’s Literature Studies," a public lecture by Dr. Sabah Aisawi on June 21 from 12:00 to 1:00. The lecture will take place in room 2C14 on the University of Winnipeg campus.

While children’s literature written in Arabic has made tremendous strides in the last three decades, academic studies of that literature are very scarce. This talk addresses the position of Arabic Children’s Literature Studies today in light of contemporary international studies of English children’s literature. Through briefly sketching her own work in this area, Dr. Aisawi aims to draw the attention of both Arab and non-Arab scholars to a little trodden field of study that can offer a wide variety of research topics.

Dr. Sabah Aisawi is an Assistant Professor at the College of Arts, University of Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and is a Visiting Researcher at the Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures at the University of Winnipeg. Dr. Aisawi was the first woman to gain a PhD in Saudi Arabia in the field of children’s literature, and is a contributor to the Guide to Children’s Writers and Illustrators in Saudi Arabia.

ARCYP Program at 2012 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences

February 22, 2012

Congress 2012 of the Humanities and Social Sciences CROSSROADS: SCHOLARSHIP FOR AN UNCERTAIN WORLD
Wilfrid Laurier University and University of Waterloo
Waterloo, Ontario
May 26 – June 2, 2012

Association for Research in Cultures of Young People Program
May 28 – 29, 2012

MONDAY, MAY 28, 2012
1:30 – 2:45 p.m. / Room: TBA
Project Groundings: A Transnational Approach to Art and Youth Identity Development in conjunction with SSHRC-funded Project Groundings and Toronto’s Nia Centre for the Arts
Chair: Naila Keleta-Mae (U of Waterloo)

Emerging Artists from Nia Centre for the Arts articulate their life stories through spoken word, theatre, and photography, exploring the complex ways in which Afrodiasporic identity is textured, disrupted, and devalued by everyday occurrences of violence. How might art address systemic violence in African Jamaican and African Canadian lives?

Open to all Congress delegates; admission free

TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2012
9:00 – 10:15 a.m. / Room: TBA

Joint ACCUTE / ARCYP Session
TROUBLING NORMATIVITY IN CULTURES OF YOUNG PEOPLE
Chair: Louise Saldanha (Grande Prairie Regional College)
Krys Verrall (York University)“The Meaning of Difference”
Brendan Burrows (University of Ottawa)“’Punks from South Central’: Re-situating Marginality and Hegemonic Whiteness in Larry Clark’s Wassup Rockers
Molly McKibbin (York University) “Racialization and Belonging in Rachel Harper’s Brass Ankle Blues

10:30 a.m. – 12:00 noon / Room: TBA

Joint ACCUTE / ARCYP Session
YOUTH CREATORS, THINKERS, AND EXPRESSIONS OF “CHILD CONSCIOUSNESS”
Chair: Cheryl Cowdy (York University)
A. Clotilde Houchon (University of Utah) “Disguised as Dick Tracy: Comics, Safe House, and Transmigrant Youth”
Stuart Poyntz (Simon Fraser University) “Scenes and Urban Youth Media Production Ecologies in Canada”
Jennifer Hardwick (Queen’s University)“These Are Our Stories, These Are Our Songs: Multimedia Storytelling in Another Slice

1:45 – 3:30 p.m. / Room: TBA

Joint ACCUTE / ARCYP Session
YOUTH, (IMAGINARY) BORDERS, AND THE NATION STATE
Chair: Stuart Poyntz (Simon Fraser U)
Heather Snell (University of Winnipeg) “Global Citizenship and YA Literatures in Canada: Unpacking Contemporary Representations of the Young (Virtual) Traveler”
Sara Dorrow and Dale Ballucci (University of New Brunswick) “Constructing Childhood at the Boundaries of the Nation: An Investigation of the Treatment of Children at the Canadian Border”
Helene Staveley (Memorial University) “Border, Nation, Playground, Gamespace: The Fantastic Spaces of Children’s Books by Margaret Atwood and Welwyn Wilton Katz (and Maybe Salman Rushdie, Too)”
Genevičve Brisson (University of British Columbia) “Québécois Young Adult Novels in Translation in Canada”

4:00 – 5:30 p.m. / Room: TBA

Joint ACCUTE / ARCYP Session
ROUNDTABLE: THE FRIENDLY GIANT’S "EMPTY CHAIR": THE MISSING HISTORIES OF CANADIAN CHILDREN’S MEDIA INDUSTRIES
Chair: Natalie Coulter (Wilfrid Laurier University)
Participants:
Kristine Moruzi (University of Alberta)
Peter Moss (Youth Media Alliance)
Leslie Regan Shade (Concordia University)

Although Canada has a long and distinguished history of producing media texts for children (children’s television, film, music, magazines, and video games), that history is often invisible. This roundtable of scholars and practitioners will begin to recuperate the history of Canadian children’s cultural industries.

Open to all Congress delegates; admission free

2012 David Almond Fellowships for Research in Children’s Literature

February 9, 2012

Newcastle University’s School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics and Seven Stories, the national centre for children’s books proudly announce the creation of David Almond Fellowships. The awards recognise both David Almond’s contribution to children’s literature and his connections with these partner institutions: he is a patron of Seven Stories and an honorary graduate of Newcastle University.

Further particulars

The Fellowships aim to promote high-quality research in the Seven Stories collections that will call attention to their breadth and scholarly potential. The two awards of Ł300 each are to facilitate a research visit to the Seven Stories collections in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK of at least three days by a bona fide researcher working on a relevant project. Applications will be considered from candidates in any academic discipline. The successful applicants will have a clearly defined project that will benefit from having access to the Seven Stories collections. All applicants should consult the Seven Stories catalogue as part of preparing their applications: http://www.sevenstories.org.uk/collection/. A well-developed dissemination strategy will be an advantage. Priority will be given to the importance of the project and best use of the Seven Stories collections as judged by a senior member of the Children’s Literature Unit in the School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics at Newcastle University and a senior member of the Collections team at Seven Stories.

Eligibility for the award

Applicants must hold a first degree or higher from a recognised institution of higher education. Note: non-EEA applicants are reminded that to take up a Fellowship they must hold an appropriate visa. Neither Newcastle University nor Seven Stories can help with this process. Please see the UK visas website for more information: http://www.ukvisas.gov.uk/en/howtoapply

Responsibilities

Fellowships must be taken up before the end of December 2012. Recipients are expected to spend at least three days in Newcastle and are encouraged to time their visits to enable them to participate in events organised jointly or separately by the Children’s Literature Unit and Seven Stories. (Please note: successful applicants must contact Seven Stories and agree a date for the visit prior to making travel arrangements; normally a minimum of two weeks notice is required before any research visit.) Acknowledgement of the Fellowships must accompany all dissemination activities arising from the research.

Application process

Applicants are asked to submit the following items by 1 June, 2012

  • an application form
  • a curriculum vitae
  • a brief proposal (of 1,000 words maximum)
  • one confidential letter of recommendation (sealed and signed; confidential letters may be included in your application packet or recommenders may send them directly)

Applications may be submitted by email or post.

Email: Kim.Reynolds@ncl.ac.uk

Post: David Almond Fellowships
School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics
Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU
UK

Mavis Reimer at Panel Discussion for Chris Reid: I like to believe I am telling the truth

January 30, 2012

Mavis Reimer will be participating in the panel discussion for Chris Reid: I like to believe I am telling the truth, a double-sited exhibition co-presented by Gallery 1C03 and the Oseredok Ukrainian Cultural and Educational Centre.

This panel discussion has been organized to complement Chris Reid’s current exhibition, I like to believe I am telling the truth, at Gallery 1C03 and Oseredok Ukrainian Cultural and Educational Centre. The exhibition includes large-scale pastel drawings, quirky re-interpretations of Ukrainian Easter eggs and multi-media sculptural installations that incorporate recycled and found objects. Through these diverse media, Reid invents lush visual narratives containing a sundry cast of characters – from folkloric symbols of her Ukrainian heritage and her husband’s African heritage such as Baba Yaga buildings and Anansi the spider to idiosyncratic anthropomorphic cats, dolls, bunnies and bread – that play out their actions in surreal prairie landscapes and unsettling domestic environments.

Three academics have been invited to share their current research as it relates to themes in the exhibition. Dr. Pauline Greenhill, Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at The University of Winnipeg, will present “That’s Not Folklore! (A)Musings on Art and Tradition” which includes a discussion of how Raymond Williams’ ideas of archaic, residual and emergent traditions focus an understanding of processes linking folklore and art. For her presentation "Folklore Characters as Perceived by People, Art and the Media", Joint Postdoctoral Fellow at The University of Manitoba’s Department of German and Slavic Studies & Centre for Ukrainian Canadian Studies Dr. Svitlana Kukharenko will deliver an overview of anthropomorphism in Ukrainian folklore. She will also speak to representations of Baba Yaga and Koshchey in Russian high art and Soviet cinema. Dr. Mavis Reimer is Canada Research Chair in Young People’s Texts and Cultures, and Professor of English at The University of Winnipeg. In "No Place Like Home: Some Thoughts about Unhoming in Contemporary Culture", Dr. Reimer will talk about the ways in which the ideas of place, the relationships and the feelings associated with "home" are disrupted in contemporary culture. She will focus on the ways in which the work by Chris Reid can be read beside a group of Canadian narratives for young people that represent and encode such unhomings. Following the presentations, audience members are encouraged to engage in a question and answer dialogue with the panelists.

The exhibition runs from February 9 to April 14, 2012, and the panel discussion takes place in Eckhardt-Gramatté Hall on Thursday, March 22 at 7:00PM.

Chris Reid is a visual artist and educator based out of Brandon, Manitoba. Reid completed Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Education degrees from the University of Alberta as well as a Master of Fine Arts degree from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago where she specialized in painting and drawing. In addition to her artistic practice, Reid has worked as a contemporary art curator and is employed as a Housing Resource Worker for the Brandon Regional Health Authority. She has been the recipient of grants for her art from the Manitoba Arts Council and the Alberta Foundation for the Arts. Reid has exhibited across Canada and in the United States for more than 25 years, including recent solo exhibitions at the Yukon Arts Centre, Latitude 53 and the Thames Art Gallery. I like to believe I am telling the truth is Chris Reid’s first solo exhibition in Winnipeg. It will travel to the Art Gallery of Southwestern Manitoba later this year.

Invitation to Contribute to International Child Research Ethics Project

January 9, 2012

This is an invitation to contribute to an important international initiative aimed at improving understandings and practice in relation to ethical research with children and young people. This work, under way for the past two years, will culminate in an International Charter and Ethics Guidelines.

By way of brief background, Childwatch International convened a meeting at the University of London in July 2011 to discuss ethical issues and approaches to research with/on/for children and young people. This was attended by leading international child and youth researchers and managers in the fields of ethics philosophy, policy and practice. Participants at this meeting reviewed work previously undertaken by Childwatch International that included findings from an international survey exploring ethical issues in research with children in different international contexts and a comprehensive international literature review identifying key developments in this area (see: http://www.childwatch.uio.no/projects/project-of-the-month/2010/research-ethics). The meeting agreed that while the importance of ethical research with children and young people is now widely accepted, the tension between universally agreed principles and situationally applied practice needs considerably more thought.

In order to progress this agenda, Childwatch International has partnered on a project with the UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre that will:

a) Develop an International Ethics Charter for research involving children and young people (also linking to the values embedded in the spirit of the UNCRC)

b) Develop Ethics Guidelines that can be applied within and across different international (research, policy, practice and disciplinary) contexts. These need to reflect universal principles and have relevance within diverse cross-cultural contexts

c) Identify cost effective, flexible approaches to training/capacity building for organisations and disciplines seeking to adopt more ethical child and youth research practice in a range of contexts

d) Develop a web portal to provide a repository of information, publications and resources relevant to child and youth research, as well as a discussion board for advice and support around ethical issues and dilemmas encountered by researchers, policy makers, practitioners and ethics governance bodies

In progressing this project we are mindful of the excellent work that has been undertaken in different international contexts, much of which we have already incorporated through the consultations and activities related to our previous survey, literature reviews and resource mapping exercises. We are conscious, however, there may be recent initiatives we’re not aware of in relation to:

  1. Child/youth research ethics initiatives, resources or activities that you would like to draw to our attention;
  2. Training programs, modules or initiatives informing and/or supporting either new or more experienced researchers.

We would appreciate your further input on these two matters, particularly. More importantly, however, we would warmly welcome your ongoing engagement with this initiative as we are very committed to ensuring the development of the Ethics Charter and Guidelines continues to involve those in the child/youth research, policy, NGO and ethics governance communities with expertise and experience to contribute.

Contacts:

Associate Professor Nicola Taylor
Acting Director, Centre for Research on Children & Families University of Otago New Zealand
nicola.taylor@otago.ac.nz

Professor Anne Graham
Director, Centre for Children & Young People Southern Cross University Australia
anne.graham@scu.edu.au

Jeunesse Editor Catherine Tosenberger at MLA’s Chat With An Editor

December 21, 2011

On Monday January 7, Jeunesse editor, Dr. Catherine Tosenberger will be participating in the "Chat with an Editor" session at the MLA Convention in Seattle. Dr. Tosenberger will be on from 11:00AM to 12:00PM.

For the past ten years, in an effort to help younger scholars submitting their work to journals, the Council of Editors of Learned Journals, an Allied Organization of MLA, has sponsored "Chat with an Editor" at the MLA Convention.

The service gives scholars the opportunity to meet one-on-one with an experienced editor to discuss any aspect of the publication process. It is not an article vetting service, but rather a chance for authors to obtain advice on any aspect of writing, submitting, and publishing a journal article, in a neutral and friendly atmosphere. Advisors and advisees will meet in Room 2A, Washington State Convention Center. In recent years, about half of the advisees have been graduate students and half have been assistant professors, postdocs, adjunct or part-time professors, and independent scholars.

For more information about this event, see here.

Dodson Visiting Professorship in Children’s Literature at UBC

December 9, 2011

The University of British Columbia holds an international reputation for excellence in advanced research and learning. It is located in Vancouver, Canada, one of the world’s most beautiful and culturally diverse cities. SLAIS, the iSchool at UBC, is pleased to invite applications for the first Dodson Visiting Professorship named in honour of Suzanne and Earl Dodson.

This is a competitive position that provides funds to enable the successful candidate to spend a term engaged in Teaching and Research at the iSchool and with the UBC Community. Academics at all levels from all countries are encouraged to apply. Applicants will normally hold a doctoral degree, and currently be employed in an institution of higher education.

This inaugural position will be for a Visiting Professor in the field of Children’s Literature, who will bring expertise and an active record of scholarship in children’s or young adult literature or a related field. Preference will be given to candidates who have a proven track record of high quality research productivity and experience in teaching. This is an opportunity to work with the Chair of our Master of Arts in Children’s Literature, who is an award-winning researcher in the area of Canadian literature for children.

This Visiting Professorship opens the opportunity to teach, interact, and mentor students in the Master of Arts in Children’s Literature Program by teaching two classes in this multidisciplinary field.

Expertise in the area of children’s or young adult literature or media and an understanding of the issues surrounding children’s or young adult literature scholarship are required. This research will be showcased at a colloquium, which will be open to all faculty, librarians, students and alumni.

The Dodson Visiting Professorship funds this position for one term in the amount of $15,000, and can be supplemented with teaching (up to 2 courses) to $30,000.

Address all enquiries and applications comprising a letter of interest and a current CV to:

Professor Caroline Haythornthwaite
Director – SLAIS, the iSchool at UBC
The University of British Columbia
The Irving K. Barber Learning Centre
Suite 470, 1961 East Mall
Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 CANADA

Closing date: Review of applications will begin on March 1 2012 and continue until the visiting professorship has been awarded.

Start date: Either September 4 2012 or January 3 2013

Martine Leavitt Reading at U of W

October 28, 2011

CRYTC is pleased to host a reading by YA novelist Martine Leavitt on November 7. It will take place from 12:30PM to 1:30PM in room 3C01 at the University of Winnipeg.

Martine Leavitt has a Honours English degree from the University of Calgary and a Master of Fine Arts from Vermont College, where she is currently a member of the faculty. She has written seven award-winning novels for young adults, including Tom Finder, winner of the Mr. Christie Award, Heck Superhero, a finalist for the Governor General’s Award, and Keturah and Lord Death, a finalist for the National Book Award. Her eighth novel, My Book of Life by Angel, will be out in the fall of 2012. Her novels have been published in Japan, Korea, Denmark, Germany, Switzerland, Italy and the Netherlands.

This event is free and open to the public.

Every Good Writer’s Plan with Martine Leavitt

October 7, 2011

Join accomplished Young Adult author Martine Leavitt in a full-day masterclass on plot and structure in longer works of fiction.

John Gardner said, "Though action with no meaning beyond its own brute existence can have no lasting appeal, plot is, or must sooner or later become, the focus of every good writer’s plan." This workshop will offer tips on how to make that plan, how to structure a longer work of fiction and set up that structure in those first ten pages - usually all the time you get with that agent or editor.

Date: Sunday, November 6
Time: 8:30 am - 4:30 pm
Place: 218-100 Arthur Street (Burns Family Classroom)
Cost: $100 for Manitoba Writers’ Guild members, $150 for non-members

Submission Deadline: October 17

Eligibility: Writers with some history of publication are eligible to apply.

Please submit: 8-10 pages of creative writing that you would like to work on in the class,and a short CV outlining your publication background to info@mbwriter.mb.ca.

Cheques should be made out to the Manitoba Writers’ Guild and mailed to 218-100 Arthur Street, Winnipeg MB, R3B 1H3.

This masterclass is limited to 10 participants.

Martine Leavitt has a Honours English degree from the University of Calgary and a Master of Fine Arts from Vermont College, where she is currently a member of the faculty. She has written seven award-winning novels for young adults, including Tom Finder, winner of the Mr. Christie Award, Heck Superhero, a finalist for the Governor General’s Award, and Keturah and Lord Death, a finalist for the National Book Award. Her eighth novel, My Book of Life by Angel, will be out in the fall of 2012. Her novels have been published in Japan, Korea, Denmark, Germany, Switzerland, Italy and the Netherlands. She is a mother of seven and a grandmother of eleven - all of whom are critically acclaimed.

Martine Leavitt will also be doing a reading at the University of Winnipeg on November 7, 2011 from 12:30 to 1:30 in Room 3C01.

2011 International Brothers Grimm Award Winner

September 28, 2011

The International Institute for Children’s Literature in Osaka is pleased to announce the 2011 winner of the International Brothers Grimm Award: Professor Jiang Feng, Professor Emeritus of Zhejiang Normal University in China.

The award presentation ceremony and Professor Jiang Feng’s commemoration lecture will be held on December 11, 2011.

Jiang Feng has founded the basis for and has contributed to development of research on Chinese children’s literature for a long time. He has also been active as one of the central figures in the field of children’s literature research in Asia.

He began his pioneering research into children’s literature as a lecturer at Zhejiang Normal University in 1952. He put his energy into educating scholars, and in 1979, he founded the first graduate school to confer a master degree in children’s literature, an institution which has produced many scholars and editors of children’s literature in China.

Professor Jiang Feng has written many books, including Introduction to Children’s Literature(1982), a theoretical and practical handbook for the study of children’s literature. It is still in print, having gone through several pressings, and it was the recipient of the first Children’s Literature Research Award in China. It is also used as a textbook in Malaysia.

He consciously started arranging a comprehensive history of children’s literature in China which resulted in: Chinese Modern History of Children’s Literature (1987); Chinese Contemporary History of Children’s Literature(1991); Chinese History of Children’s Literature(1998); and The Development History of Children’s Literature(2007). In addition, he edited the Encyclopedia of Children’s Literature in the World(1992), which evaluated Chinese children’s literature from a global point of view. These books are essential for the basic research of Chinese children’s literature.

Professor Jiang Feng also published the first book on toys in China, On Toys (1992), examining the fact that eighty percent of toys in the world are produced in China and going on to consider the long history of toys in China.

He played an important role in the 10th Conference of the Asian Children’s Literature Association held at Zhejiang Normal University in October, 2010, and has disseminated information on Chinese children’s literature via many international conventions, such as the International Symposium between China and Japan in 1985.

Call for Peer Reviewers: Journal of Graduate Research in Young People’s Materials and Culture

September 19, 2011

The Journal of Graduate Research in Young People’s Materials and Culture (JGR) is a peer-reviewed open-access e-journal that will publish graduate student research in the areas of children’s and young adult literature, childhood studies, and cultural studies related to children and young people, as well as creative writing for children and young adults. We are committed to promoting outstanding research and creative writing by emerging scholars in children’s and young adult literature. The manuscripts selected for publication undergo a double blind peer review and will be drawn from papers presented at the biennial Graduate Student Children’s Literature Research Conference held at the University of British Columbia.

JGR will publish one issue every two years, concurrent with the conference schedule, but will hopefully grow to become an annual or semi-annual publication over time with open submissions year-round. Issues will be published in the fall following the conference (i.e. October 2012 publication after the May 2012 conference) and the theme of each journal issue will reflect the conference theme.

We are currently developing a list of peer reviewers to help evaluate manuscript submissions within the months following the 2012 conference and hopefully after each conference in succeeding years. We will be utilizing a double blind peer review process to select and approve papers for publication. Readers will be asked to undertake the basic reviewing tasks of summarizing the article, providing a recommendation on acceptance, and listing suggestions for revision as appropriate. Because the articles will be submitted by graduate students and not established scholars, we are hoping the review feedback will be slightly more detailed and constructive to help students build a better understanding of the scholarly publishing process.

If you are interested in contributing as a peer reviewer please send an email to jgr.journal@yahoo.ca indicating your areas of interest and the types of papers you would like to review. Feel free to view our site, which currently includes a mock-issue with an example of the format of published works (http://ojs.library.ubc.ca/index.php/ypmc/index). We will be accepting both scholarly essays and creative writing pieces.

ARCYP / Children’s Studies Program Symposium 2011

September 8, 2011

ARCYP / Children’s Studies Program Symposium 2011 CHILDREN’S MATERIAL CULTURES
York University - Friday October 21, 2011 – 1:00 – 4:30 p.m.

On Friday October 21, 2011, from 1:00 to 4:30 p.m., the Association for Research in Cultures of Young People (ARCYP) and the Children’s Studies Program at York University will co-present a symposium on new research in Children’s Material Cultures. The symposium is free and open to all faculty and students in the Children’s Studies Program as well as to other interested people from York and beyond. Presenters will include ARCYP Executive members and York Children’s Studies Program faculty and students.

The symposium will consist of two panels/roundtables and open discussion on new and emerging research on children’s material cultures, and will include time for refreshments and socializing and meeting with the presenters.

CALL FOR BRIEF PAPER PROPOSALS

ARCYP Executive Members, ARCYP Members, and interested York Children’s Studies Faculty or students are invited to send a TITLE and ONE BRIEF PARAGRAPH describing their proposed 15-20-minute presentation to the symposium coordinator in an e-mail message to admin@arcyp.ca no later than Friday September 23 so that the event can be publicized appropriately.

Description

For the purposes of this symposium, children’s material culture is understood to refer to those things that are central to the way meaningfulness and relationality are constituted, negotiated, and made anew within the diverse and globalized contexts of young people’s contemporary lives. This includes the practices through which children’s things - including toys, games, literatures and technologies – are used and consumed, and the way such things (and their associated practices) are situated in relation to particular contexts and to questions of political economy, gender, race and sexuality. While children and youth in the global North and South continue to be the site of an immense set of challenges, pressures, and risks – that have to do with the environment, war, health, politics, the economy, and the role of new technologies – that shape young people’s mobility, opportunity, and sense of the future, this symposium seeks new research that examines how and in what ways children’s things are implicated in and, in some instances, an antidote to the above risks. This includes work that addresses the amplified role of consumerism as a constituent feature of the children’s material cultures and work that examines how this culture operates in the spaces and places children call home.

Topics for the symposium may include but are not limited to the following:

  • research from various methodological traditions – including phenomenology, cultural studies, and ethnography – that addresses children’s use of games, toys, and technologies as a feature of play, work, or education
  • research that examines the changing nature of consumerism and consumer practices in children’s material culture
  • research that examines the role of things (toys, games, and technologies) in relation to children’s socialization

More generally, we are interested in:

  • materialist-feminist criticism and analyses of children’s literature and culture
  • materialist analyses of post-colonial children’s literature and culture
  • the political economy of children’s literature and culture

Contact: Stuart Poyntz, Symposium Coordinator
admin@arcyp.ca

CFP - The Same Text but Different: Variants in Children’s Media

September 7, 2011

Children’s Literature Symposium: Critical Perspectives on Children’s and Young Adult Literature

CALL FOR PAPERS: The Same Text but Different: Variants in Children’s Media
February 3-4, 2012
The University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Perry Nodelman

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF PROPOSALS: October 15, 2011
NOTIFICATION OF ACCEPTANCE: November 15, 2011

Conference Website: http://www.ChildrensLiteratureSymposium.org

About the Children’s Literature Symposium

Each year, the University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee organizes a symposium centered on issues related to the study of children’s and young adult literature. The overarching goal of these symposia is to explore children’s and young adult literature through scholarship, research, and criticism: approaching children’s and young adult literature as genres, as opposed to indications of readership. The Children’s Literature Symposium (CLS) provides a program through which participants engage with critical and theoretical perspectives on children’s and young adult literature. Through presentations that address contemporary issues and trends affecting children’s and young adult literature, media, and culture, the CLS aims to engage professionals from the fields of English, education, and library/media science in scholarly discussions about children’s and young adult literature. Themes selected for CLS conferences both reflect current trends (or currently ignored but potentially significant areas) and work to shape where and how children’s literature studies might most usefully move forward. Undergirding the decision to focus each CLS on a specific topic is a belief in the value of a group of contributors all working in and around similar issues.

2012 Children’s Literature Symposium Theme

This year, the CLS Steering and Planning Committees invite proposals from scholars, critics, researchers, librarians, educators, children’s book authors and illustrators, and graduate students for presentations that address the topic of "variants" in children’s and young adult literature: books with plots built upon folklore or other previously written tales. Interest in variants is hardly new, and ultimately, all texts build upon one another. However, recent increases in the publication of picturebooks, novels, and releases of other media (such as film and video games) with plots or structures that draw on folklore (e.g., Gidwitz’s [2010] A Tale Dark and Grimm, Weston’s [2010] Dust City), the work of authors like William Shakespeare(e.g., Dionne’s [2010] The Total Tragedy of a Girl Named Hamlet, Stone’s [2011] The Romeo and Juliet Code, Ray’s [2011] Falling for Hamlet), Henry James (e.g., Griffin’s [2011] Tighter), or Jules Verne (e.g., Blackwood’s [2010] "sort of sequel," Around the World in 100 Days), or composers like Vivaldi (e.g., Zalben’s [2011] Four Seasons: A Novel in Four Movements) suggest a renewed cultural fascination with texts that "play" with other texts. In addition, single texts have been adapted across media: Neil Gaiman’s Coraline (2002), for example, has been released as both a 2009 feature film and as a 2008 graphic novel (adapted and illustrated by P. Craig Russell).

Through this year’s symposium, we seek to further discussions and enrich understandings of both historical and contemporary children’s and young adult literature and media that lean on, contradict, or extend other texts—privileging some at the expense of others. Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Literary lore, fractured fairy tales, and the authorial use (and/or abuse) of folklore
  • Cultural literacy and cultural capital
  • Reinscribing and disrupting media Canons
  • Shifting audiences: retellings or the appropriation of children’s texts for adults (or "adult" texts being retold or appropriated by/for children)
  • Variants as/in translation
  • Fanfiction, slash fiction, and other reader-created retellings
  • Re-writing of "mainstream" texts by traditionally marginalized populations (i.e., people of color, queer sexualities)
  • Theories of variation in narrative and poetic structures (generally—and in texts for young people explicitly)

We invite abstracts (of approximately 250-500 words) for individual paper presentations or virtual papers treating critical concerns in children’s and young adult literature. While all proposals will be considered, preference will be given to those which focus on most clearly on the conference theme.

Proposals must be submitted electronically to the symposium website, http://www.ChildrensLiteratureSymposium.org on or before October 15, 2011. Proposals will undergo a process of blind review, and presenters will be notified of the results on or before November 15, 2011. Receipt of proposals will be confirmed via email within 24 hours of submission.

CFP - Troubling Normativity: Race/Whiteness in the Popular Cultures Of Young People

August 19, 2011

CALL FOR PAPERS - Troubling Normativity: Race/Whiteness in the Popular Cultures Of Young People
A JOINT SESSION OF ARCYP AND ACCUTE
AT THE CONGRESS OF THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO AND WILFRID LAURIER UNIVERSITY, WATERLOO, ONTARIO
MAY 28-31, 2012
DEADLINE: November 15, 2011

This panel invites papers that use race/whiteness as a framing or entry point for critical inquiries into popular culture produced for, about, or by young people. How are systems of racialization, whiteness, and normativity produced and consumed, secured and maintained, or contested and countered? Do contemporary cultural industries affiliated with young people's texts and cultures (television, music, film, video games, publishing, theatre, etc.) challenge what Stuart Hall has famously characterized as "racialised regimes of representation" (1997) and the naturalization of racial hegemony? How does race become meaningful in relation to multicultural clichés of diversity and harmony? How does race function as co-constituent with class, sexuality, and gender?

Possible topics with a focus on race/whiteness in popular culture produced for, about, or by young people might include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • popular music (K'naan, Lady Gaga, Justin Bieber, etc.);
  • popular film (Shrek, The Princess and the Frog, etc.);
  • video games (Grand Theft Auto, Final Fantasy, etc.);
  • "tween" culture (the Obama girls, Hello Kitty, etc.);
  • television (Dora the Explorer, Sesame Street, etc.);
  • literature (The Hunger Games, Twilight, etc.).

Following the instructions under Option # 1 at www.accute.ca/generalcall.html, send your 700-word proposal (or 8-10 page double-spaced paper), a Proposal Submissions Information Sheet, and a 100-word abstract and 50-word bio-bibliographical statement, as three attachments to an email addressed to admin@arcyp.ca by November 15 2011.

NOTES: You must be a current member of ARCYP or ACCUTE to submit to this session. Rejected submissions will not be moved into the general "pool" of ACCUTE submissions.

CFP - Youth,(Imaginary) Borders, and the Nation State

August 19, 2011

CALL FOR PAPERS: Youth,(Imaginary) Borders, and the Nation State
A JOINT SESSION OF ARCYP AND ACCUTE AT THE CONGRESS OF THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO AND WILFRID LAURIER UNIVERSITY, WATERLOO, ONTARIO
MAY 28-31, 2012
DEADLINE: November 15, 2011

The nation is a fractured space today, constituted with various institutional and imaginary boundaries that shape experiences of belonging, identity, and childhood. Some boundaries are geographic, such as the borders between the Canadian provinces or between neighbouring countries. Some are related to language – for instance, the boundary between the "two solitudes" in Canada – or relate to the passage of time – for instance, the boundaries between childhood, adolescence and adulthood. These boundaries may be defined as limits never or hardly ever crossed, or as opportunities for youth to grow and mature. Given this, we invite papers that explore and complicate the relationship of youth to imaginary boundaries.

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • young adult and children's literature in translation and the process of translating;
  • young adult bilingual/ multilingual literature;
  • (imaginary) borders and young people's electronic and digitally mediated texts;
  • young people's experiences in other countries or provinces, and volunteering abroad;
  • bilingual and multilingual youth experience.

Following the instructions under Option # 1 at www.accute.ca/generalcall.html, send your 700-word proposal (or 8-10 page double-spaced paper), a Proposal Submissions Information Sheet, and a 100-word abstract and 50-word bio-bibliographical statement, as three attachments to an email addressed to admin@arcyp.ca by November 15 2011.

NOTES: You must be a current member of ARCYP or ACCUTE to submit to this session. Rejected submissions will not be moved into the general "pool" of ACCUTE submissions.

CFP - Youth Creators, Thinkers, and Expressions of "Child Consciousness"

August 19, 2011

CALL FOR PAPERS: Youth Creators, Thinkers, and Expressions of "Child Consciousness"
A JOINT SESSION OF ARCYP AND ACCUTE AT THE CONGRESS OF THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO AND WILFRID LAURIER UNIVERSITY, WATERLOO, ONTARIO
MAY 28-31, 2012
DEADLINE: November 15, 2011

For Merleau-Ponty, the danger of "dogmatic rationalism" in psychological models of development is the creation of a false dichotomy between two "impermeable" mentalities – that of the child and that of the adult – a hierarchy that fixes "adult experience within concepts such as the 'representation of the world'" and "renders communication between the adult and the child theoretically impossible." These quagmires are vindicated for Merleau-Ponty by the "extraordinary 'anticipations' of the child's thought." We invite papers that analyze various examples of child and youth creative and philosophical consciousness and cultural production. How do young creators and thinkers disrupt the notion that the products of their thought are defined as extraordinary for what they 'anticipate' rather than for what they 'are'? How do they make permeable the division between adult and child/youth experiences, 'representations of the world,' and effective knowledge?

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • young people as creators of culture and cultural expression;
  • young people as co-creators or collaborators;
  • young people as scholars, philosophers, theorists;
  • young people’s writing, visual art, film;
  • youth and digital media, such as YouTube, blogs, fan fiction, etc.;
  • the material conditions, dissemination, and transmission of youth cultural and philosophical thought and expression.

Following the instructions under Option # 1 at www.accute.ca/generalcall.html, send your 700-word proposal (or 8-10 page double-spaced paper), a Proposal Submissions Information Sheet, and a 100-word abstract and 50-word bio-bibliographical statement, as three attachments to an email addressed to admin@arcyp.ca by November 15 2011.

NOTES: You must be a current member of ARCYP or ACCUTE to submit to this session. Rejected submissions will not be moved into the general “pool” of ACCUTE submissions.

Fairy Tale Film Symposium at U of W

August 5, 2011

All are invited to participate in a Fairy Tale Film Symposium at the University of Winnipeg. Visiting scholars Cristina Bacchilega, Professor of English at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa; Sidney Eve Matrix, Queen’s National Scholar and Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and Film at Queen’s University; and Jack Zipes, professor emeritus of German and comparative literature at the University of Minnesota will each discuss their latest research, on Monday, August 15 from 1:30 to 5:30 pm in 2M70.

For more information please visit our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/186973328024809?ap=1#!/event.php?eid=193978003989963 or contact Pauline Greenhill at p.greenhill@uwinnipeg.ca.

IBBY Announces Nominees for the Hans Christian Andersen Awards 2012

May 20, 2011

The Hans Christian Andersen Awards are presented every two years by IBBY (International Board on Books for Young People) to an author and an illustrator whose complete works have made an important and lasting contribution to children’s literature. IBBY National Sections from 33 countries have made their selections, submitting the following 28 authors and 31 illustrators as candidates for the 2012 Hans Christian Andersen Awards:

Argentina: Author: Maria Teresa Andruetto; Illustrator: Pablo Bernasconi
Australia: Author: Christobel Mattingley; Illustrator: Bob Graham
Austria: Author: Monika Pelz; Illustrator: Renate Habinger
Belgium: Author: Bart Moeyaert; Illustrator: Louis Joos
Brazil: Author: Bartolomeu Campos de Queiros; Illustrator: Roger Mello
Canada: Author: Tim Wynne-Jones; Illustrator: Stephane Jorisch
Cyprus: Author: Elli Peonidou
Czech Republic: Illustrator: Peter Sis
Denmark: Author: Lene Kaaberbol; Illustrator: Charlotte Pardi
Finland: Author: Sinikka Nopola / Tiina Nopola; Illustrator: Virpi Talvitie
France: Author: Jean-Claude Mourlevat; Illustrator: Henri Galeron
Germany: Author: Paul Maar; Illustrator: Rotraut Susanne Berner
Greece: Author: Christos Boulotis; Illustrator: Effie Lada
Iran: Illustrator: Mohammad Ali Baniasadi
Ireland: Author: Eoin Colfer
Italy: Author: Bianca Pitzorno; Illustrator: Francesco Tullio-Altan
Japan: Author: Masamoto Nasu; Illustrator: Satoshi Kako
Republic of Korea: Author: Hwang Sun-Mi; Illustrator: Hong Seong-Chan
Latvia: Illustrator: Anita Paegle
Netherlands: Author: Tonke Dragt; Illustrator: Annemarie van Haeringen
Norway: Author: Bjorn Sortland; Illustrator: Oyvind Torseter
Romania: Author: Silvia Kerim; Illustrator: Valeria Moldovan
Russia: Illustrator: Gennadij Spirin
Serbia: Author: Ljubivoje Rsumovic; Illustrator: Dobrosav Zivkovic
Slovak Republic: Author: Daniel Hevier Illustrator: Peter Uchnar
Slovenia: Author: Tone Pavcek; Illustrator: Alenka Sottler
Spain: Author: Agustin Fernandez Paz; Illustrator: Javier Zabala Herrero
Sweden: Lennart Hellsing; Illustrator: Anna-Clara Tidholm
Switzerland: Author: Franz Hohler; Illustrator: Kathrin Scharer
Turkey: Author: Sevim Ak; Illustrator: Feridun Oral
United Kingdom: Author: Philip Pullman; Illustrator: John Burningham
USA: Author: Paul Fleischman; Illustrator: Chris Raschka
Venezuela: Illustrator: Arnal Balleste

The elected Chair of the International Hans Christian Andersen Award Jury, Maria Jesus Gil (Spain) and Jury members from Argentina, Austria, Brazil, France, Greece, Iran, Russia, Sweden, Turkey and the United States of America, will meet on 10-11 March 2012 and the shortlist will be disseminated immediately. The winners will be announced at the IBBY Press Conference at the Bologna Children’s Book Fair on Monday, 19 March 2012.

For more information about IBBY’s programme and current projects please contact the IBBY Secretariat or visit: http://www.ibby.org.

IBBY CANADA CALL FOR PROPOSALS: FRANCES E. RUSSELL GRANT

April 4, 2011

The Canadian National Section of the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY Canada) is now accepting proposals for the 2011 Frances E. Russell Grant. The $1,000 grant is intended to support IBBY Canada’s mission "to initiate and encourage research in young people’s literature in all its forms" and is given in support of research for a publishable work (a book or a paper) on Canadian children’s literature.

The deadline for proposals, which may be submitted in English or in French, is May 1, 2011. The grant supports scholarly work only; works of fiction are not eligible. The types of works that are eligible for the 2011 Frances E. Russell Grant include:

  1. Studies of individual authors and their work, especially if considered in their socio-historical context.
  2. Comparative studies of two or more authors, which illuminate their stylistic differences, or consider their social and historical approaches.
  3. Subject/Genre overviews, for example, Canadian fantasy or historical fiction.
  4. Biographical studies of Canadian children’s authors or illustrators.
  5. Studies of Canadian children’s illustrators and their work.
  6. Related subjects including contemporary theoretical approaches to the study of Canadian children’s literature.
  7. Research for children’s fiction or non-fiction based on Canadian topics or subjects.

Three copies of the following materials are required: a proposal, a curriculum vitae, a synopsis of methods and stages by which the applicant will pursue the research, and a summary of what the funds are to be used for. The competition is open to Canadian citizens or landed immigrants. Please send proposals to:

IBBY Canada c/o The Canadian Children’s Book Centre
Suite 101, 40 Orchard View Blvd.
Toronto, ON M4R 1B9

Attention: Deirdre Baker, Frances E. Russell Grant Chair

A jury, appointed by IBBY Canada, will select the successful applicant by June 1, 2011.

ABOUT IBBY AND THE FRANCES E. RUSSELL GRANT

The Frances E. Russell Grant was established by the late Marjorie Russell in memory of her sister, a long time supporter of IBBY Canada. Past winners include Vivian Howard, Gail Edwards and Judith Saltman, Michelle Mulder, Andre Gagnon, Ronald Jobe, Carole Carpenter, Linda Granfield, and Francoise Lepage. For more information about the Frances E. Russell Grant, please visit the IBBY Canada web site at www.ibby-canada.org or write to info@ibby-canada.org.

The International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY) believes in the ability of children’s books to bridge cultures and, ultimately, to promote peace. Jella Lepman, founder of the International Youth Library, started IBBY in 1953 in postwar Germany. Her goal was to promote international understanding through children’s books. Established in 1980, IBBY Canada is one of more than seventy sections worldwide.

"The new tween heroine in The Chronicles of Narnia and Coraline: Rewriting discourses of identity through cross-media narratives" - A Lecture by Naomi Hamer

March 4, 2011

CRYTC is pleased to present a lecture by Dr. Naomi Hamer, who teaches in the Department of English at the University of Winnipeg. Dr. Hamer will be delivering a lecture entitled, "The new tween heroine in The Chronicles of Narnia and Coraline: Rewriting discourses of identity through cross-media narratives," on March 9, 2011. This event will take place at 12:30PM in 1L04.

Dr. Hamer recently completed her doctorate in cross-media texts and the literacies of tween girls, at the Centre for Research on Children, Youth and Media at the Institute of Education, University of London, UK. Her research focuses on cross-media adaptation, franchising and audience cultures, and questions relating to gender and sexuality in texts for children and young people.

"The Graphic Strategy of Skim: The Adaptation of Ukiyo-e, a Japanese print, in the graphic novel by Mariko Tamaki and Jillian Tamaki" - A Lecture by Sumiko Shirai

February 22, 2011

CRYTC is pleased to present a lecture by Dr. Sumiko Shirai, Professor in the Department of Children’s Literature and Culture at Shirayuri College in Tokyo, Japan. Dr. Shirai will be delivering a lecture entitled, "The Graphic Strategy of Skim: The Adaptation of Ukiyo-e, a Japanese print, in the graphic novel by Mariko Tamaki and Jillian Tamaki," on March 2, 2011. This event will take place at 12:30PM in 1L04.

Skim, a graphic novel by Mariko Tamaki and Jillian Tamaki, tells a coming-of-age story that includes suicide, depression, and homosexual love. Dr. Shirai will speak about the likeness between the image of the heroine Skim and the image of "Beautiful Women" in traditional Japanese Ukiyo-e woodblock prints.

Vladimir Nabokov and the Poetics of the Child by Paul Morris

February 9, 2011

Date: Thursday, February 10, 2011
Time: 2:30 PM
Location: 409 Tier Bldg, University of Manitoba

Central and East European Lecture Series speaker, Dr. Paul Morris

Children and images of childhood play a prominent role in the writing of Vladimir Nabokov, a multilingual Russian-American writer most famous in North America as the author of Lolita (1955). While the motif of children in Nabokov’s oeuvre is multi-faceted, the fate of these fictional children usually is not. Frequently, they suffer and die. Nabokov criticism has wrestled with the troubling implications of these repeated depictions of pain and suffering. A common reading has been to suggest that the image of the child serves as metaphoric representation of the fragility and transience of life and, likewise, as an extreme expression of evil. Paul Morris offers an analysis which partakes of this interpretation and expands it considerably. With a reading based primarily on Nabokov’s poetry, he suggests that the child in Nabokov’s writing is more than an image of primarily thematic importance. The child functions as an essential element in Nabokov’s poetics and represents a defining feature of his distinctive authorial voice.

Dr. Paul Morris teaches translation at the College universitaire de Saint-Boniface. He has published on a variety of topics related to Canadian, American and Slavic literatures. His Vladimir Nabokov: Poetry and the Lyric Voice appeared in March 2010 with the University of Toronto Press.

Mavis Reimer Skywalk Lecture

February 7, 2011

On February 9, 2011, Mavis Reimer will be presenting a lecture entitled "Operation Go Homeless: Street Kids in Canadian Children’s Literature" as part of the Winnipeg Public Library’s Skywalk Series.

The lecture takes place at noon in the Carol Shields Auditorium at the Millennium Library, 251 Donald Street.

In the Skywalk Lecture Series, the leading teachers and researchers from The University of Winnipeg inform, engage, and challenge you on topics of broad historical, political and scientific interest.

Youth, Citizenship, Rights Symposium at York University

January 20, 2011

ARCYP and York University’s Children’s Studies Program are sponsoring the Youth, Citizenship, Rights Symposium on January 22, 2011. Members of the ARCYP Executive, scholars from various disciplines from across Canada, Children’s Studies faculty and senior students and children will address their research in relation to youth, rights, and citizenship in papers presented in three short panels, including open discussion. The symposium will be held in Vanier College Senior Common Room (010 Vanier College), and admission is free.

Panels include Citizenship: At Home, At School, and On the Street; Children, Rights, and the Aesthetic of Citizenship; and Citizenship within the Digital Domain.

See http://arcyp.ca for more information.

ChLA Research Grant Opportunities

January 18, 2011

Each year the Children’s Literature Association provides grants in two categories--Faculty Research and Graduate Student Research. These are competitive grants that vary in award amount from $500 to $1500, based on the number and needs of the winning applicants. Up to $5,000 is available to be awarded in each category.

Further details about criteria and application procedure for the ChLA Faculty Research Grants can be found at http://www.childlitassn.org/faculty_grant.html.

Further details about criteria and application procedure for the Hannah Beiter Graduate Student Research Grants can be found at http://www.childlitassn.org/beiter_grant.html.

Applications will be accepted from now through February 1, 2011. Any questions about eligibility of projects or other matters relating to the grants should be directed to the Grants Committee Chair, Susan Stan, at stan1sm@cmich.edu or to the ChLA Administrator, Kathy Kiessling, at kkiessling@childlitassn.org.

CFP - Revolt, Rebellion, Protest: Change and Insurrection in Children’s Literature

January 11, 2011

Revolt, Rebellion, Protest: Change and Insurrection in Children’s Literature
June 23-25, 2011
Hollins University - Roanoke, Virginia

Call for Papers

Revolution, upheaval, protest, and cultural change have swept over the world in repeating cycles since civilization began and literature for children has encouraged those changes or deplored them, but always recorded them in its pages. So in 2011, at the 38th Annual Children’s Literature Association Conference, we will look at the way and speed at which our world is changing, through the lens of children’s literature. We will consider how children’s literature and characters in children’s literature, in all media from books to video games, institute change, transgress the norm, protest the status quo or seek to protect it.

We also welcome papers on the work of Virginia Euwer Wolff, winner of the 2011 Phoenix Award for her novel The Mozart Season.

Some suggested topics follow, but other ideas are welcome and encouraged:

  • The idealization of the past in children’s literature
  • Patriotism and children’s literature
  • The "red diaper babies," children of leftist or radical parents
  • Competing historical visions (Uncle Tom’s Cabin and Disney’s Song of the South for instance)
  • Historical fiction vs. works written during the revolution itself
  • The trickster figure in children’s literature
  • The American Revolution, the French Revolution, or the English Civil War
  • Children’s Literature as a mirror of changing socials values and norms
  • Explorations of racial and gender discrimination in children’s literature
  • The use of fantastic worlds and settings to explore traditionally taboo topics
  • Visions of society in series such as "Dear America" and the "American Girl" books
  • Depictions of the civil rights, anti-war, and women’s movements of the last century
  • Censorship and children’s literature
  • The "problem book" and championing a cause
  • Literature of the immigrant child
  • Chicano and Latino children’s literature
  • Historical context and changing social values - how a text may be enlightened for its time and embarrassing in our own

Send 300-500 word paper proposals to Kathryn Graham, paper selection committee chair, at chla2011@vt.edu. Deadline January 15, 2011.

For more information and conference updates go to: www.hollins.edu/chla2011

Mavis Reimer Renewed as Canada Research Chair in Young People’s Texts and Cultures

November 26, 2010

The University of Winnipeg is pleased to announce the renewal of Dr. Mavis Reimer’s appointment as Canada Research Chair in Young People’s Texts and Cultures.

Dr. Reimer is receiving a renewal of her current Tier II award, which is over a five-year term at $100,000/year. She will continue to direct the Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures in its scholarly inquiry into literary, media, and other cultural texts for children and youth. In her first five-year term, Dr. Reimer was very successful in expanding this area of research, bringing world-renowned visiting scholars to the University and making the University of Winnipeg an internationally recognized institution in this research field. She was also instrumental in the creation of the Masters in Cultural Studies. For more information on CRYTC’s projects, click here.

The Canada Research Chairs program stands at the centre of a national strategy to make Canada one of the top countries in research and development. The program invests $300-million per year to attract and retain some of the world’s most accomplished and promising minds. To learn more about this program, visit the Canada Research Chairs website.

"No Man on The Island: Emotions, Ethics, and the Politics of Recognition" - A Lecture by Dr. Debra Dudek

November 23, 2010

CRYTC is pleased to present a lecture by Dr. Debra Dudek, Lecturer in the School of English Literatures, Philosophy and Languages at the University of Wollongong, Australia. Dr. Dudek will be delivering a lecture entitled, "No Man on The Island: Emotions, Ethics, and the Politics of Recognition," on December 10, 2010. This event will take place from 1:30PM - 3:00PM in 2M70.

This talk focuses on how representations of displacement present young readers with ethical dilemmas relating to displaced beings as objects of fear and compassion and as triggers to social justice. Narratives which work overtly to encourage an ethical action often rely on an emotional engagement with—-or a compassionate response to—-the story and/or with a particular character. In two recent picture books both titled The Island, readers bear witness to unethical behaviour by a group, behaviour that is offset by the compassionate actions of an individual. In these narratives, readers both recognize themselves and acknowledge others, which leads to an understanding of how the ethical actions of an individual can challenge group belief systems. These two picture books exemplify a growing body of literature for young people that demonstrates the importance of recognizing emotional engagement as a key component of ethical action.

Download flyer here.

Girls, Texts, Cultures Symposium at U of W

September 30, 2010

Clare Bradford, our Visiting Trudeau Fellow, and the Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures will be hosting a symposium entitled "Girls, Texts, Cultures" at the University of Winnipeg from October 15 to 17.

This symposium will feature nine panels with scholars from Canada, Australia, the USA and the UK. The panels will cover topics from Cross-Media and Digital Girls to Cultural Imperatives and Texts for Girls to Girls Performing.

All panels will take place in the CFIR Boardroom (4CM41).

Download the program here.

CFP – Congress 2011 – War, Militarization, & Childhood

August 16, 2010

CALL FOR PAPERS
War, Militarization, & Childhood

A JOINT SESSION OF ARCYP AND ACCUTE

AT THE CONGRESS OF THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
FREDERICTON, NEW BRUNSWICK

MAY 28-31, 2011

DEADLINE: November 15, 2010

The ideologically-loaded Western concept of “the child,” and of childhood as a time of innocence and play, seems to make the idea of a child soldier oxymoronic. Yet, according to UNICEF, “an estimated 300,000 child soldiers—boys and girls under the age of eighteen—are involved in more than 30 conflicts worldwide” despite the United Nations’ Convention on the Rights of the Child, which prohibits child soldiers. What activist groups like War Child, with their vision to create a world in which no child knows war, make perspicuous is that there is not an incontrovertible separation between children’s spaces and the theatre of war. This panel invites papers that deal with, and complicate, the intersection of the ideological ideal of “the child,” war, and militarization.

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to: functions of child soldiers in the war on terror; histories and stories of child soldiers; artistic, digital, and literary representations of child soldiers; self-representations through memoirs by former child soldiers; the intersection(s) of the concepts of the child soldier, religion, and international law; the voices and perspectives of male and female child soldiers.

Following the instructions under Option # 1 at http://www.accute.ca/generalcall.html, send three documents in separate electronic files directly to admin@arcyp.ca by November 15, 2010: (1) a 700-word proposal or 8- to 10-page double-spaced paper, without identifying marks; (2) a 100-word abstract and 50-word biographical statement; and (3) a Proposal Submissions Information Sheet.

NOTES: You must be a current member of ARCYP or ACCUTE to submit to this session. Rejected submissions will not be moved into the general “pool” of ACCUTE submissions.

Please print and share the CFP at the ARCYP website.

CFP – Congress 2011 – Commotions: Geographies of Migration & Young People’s Cultures

August 16, 2010

CALL FOR PAPERS
Commotions: Geographies of Migration & Young People’s Cultures

A JOINT SESSION OF ARCYP AND ACCUTE

AT THE CONGRESS OF THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
FREDERICTON, NEW BRUNSWICK

MAY 28-31, 2011

DEADLINE: November 15, 2010

The world today is commonly placed as one in motion where ideologies, bodies, objects, and capital travel, both literally and metaphorically, across borders as well as across social and communication networks and technologies. Yet, as Buckingham and de Block argue, the perspectives and experiences of young people “on the move” are largely absent “except where they are portrayed as passive victims or (increasingly) as a threat.” We invite papers addressing how various forms of mobility available in young people’s cultures disrupt or support political/cultural /economic circuits of inclusion and exclusion, access and denial, belonging and alienation, incarceration and exile.

Possible topics may include (but are not limited to): travel, im/migration, displacement, relocation, asylum, citizenship; conflict and (in)security; counter-geographies: Indigenous, Non-Western, etc.; the spatial politics of gender and sexuality, disability, race, class, etc.; (re)formations of racial, national, gendered, diasporic identities, politics, subjectivities; mobile communications, social networks, new media; virtual geographies; digital hybridity, remixes, mash-ups; transportation and movement in daily life; place management, place redefinitions; work, “youth-magnets,” upward mobility; “invisible” youth on the move; youth activism and globalization.

Following the instructions under Option # 1 at http://www.accute.ca/generalcall.html, send three documents in separate electronic files directly to admin@arcyp.ca by November 15, 2010: (1) a 700-word proposal or 8- to 10-page double-spaced paper, without identifying marks; (2) a 100-word abstract and 50-word biographical statement; and (3) a Proposal Submissions Information Sheet.

NOTES: You must be a current member of ARCYP or ACCUTE to submit to this session. Rejected submissions will not be moved into the general “pool” of ACCUTE submissions.

Please print or forward the CFP at ARCYP website.

CFP – Congress 2011 – Young People’s Cultures & Games, Gaming, and Play

August 16, 2010

CALL FOR PAPERS
Young People’s Cultures & Games, Gaming, and Play

A JOINT SESSION OF ARCYP AND ACCUTE

AT THE CONGRESS OF THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
FREDERICTON, NEW BRUNSWICK

MAY 28-31, 2011

DEADLINE: November 15, 2010

Gaming and play culture have long been central components of childhood taking many forms across the Global North and South. The digital format dominates playtime today, but play is, and has been, a more complex set of practices in the everyday lives of young people. This session aims to explore how games, gaming, and play are tied to contemporary forms of social interaction and alternative ways of thinking and learning in the context of a dynamic media ecology that is participatory even while being shaped by an unparalleled moment of media concentration.

Possible topics may include (but are not limited to): forms of participation games and gaming engender for children and youth; forms of learning present, missing or reinforced through gaming; gaming literacies and specific forms of knowledge produced by games; barriers to entry in gaming/game communities; the role of race, gender, and sexuality in gaming cultures; post-coloniality and gaming cultures; identity, performance, and game play; the “burden” of play on children and youth; the expectations that children will learn and be socialized through play; the “right” of children and youth to play.

Following the instructions under Option # 1 at http://www.accute.ca/generalcall.html, send three documents in separate electronic files directly to admin@arcyp.ca by November 15, 2010: (1) a 700-word proposal or 8- to 10-page double-spaced paper, without identifying marks; (2) a 100-word abstract and 50-word biographical statement; and (3) a Proposal Submissions Information Sheet.

NOTES: You must be a current member of ARCYP or ACCUTE to submit to this session. Rejected submissions will not be moved into the general “pool” of ACCUTE submissions.

Please print or forward the CFP at the ARCYP website.

Mavis Reimer on CBC Radio’s Cross Country Checkup

August 16, 2010

Mavis Reimer, Canada Research Chair in the Culture of Childhood, just made an appearance on CBC Radio One’s Cross Country Checkup to discuss their topic of "Can you ever really return home?" on August 15, 2010.

Visit our Media Page to listen to the podcast.

Graduate Conference - National and Global Imaginaries: Culture, Community, Mobility Film Youth

July 20, 2010

Diana Brydon will be hosting a graduate student conference as the culmination of her spring seminar Topics in Local, National and Global Cultures: National and Global Imaginaries: Culture, Community, Citizenship.

The conference will be held on Thursday, July 29 in 2M70. See this program for details.

Immediately following the end of the graduate mini-conference there will be a reception hosted by the Department of English to honour this year’s cohort of graduate students - the very first for this program. This will also take place in 2M70 from 3:00PM to 6:00PM.

Call For Papers: Fear and Safety in Children’s Literature

July 9, 2010

Fear and Safety in Children’s Literature
Call For Papers

20th Biennial Congress of IRSCL 4-8 July 2011
Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia

Children’s literature has always been responsive to the tenor of the times. Texts for children and young adults take up the social, political, and humanistic interests and ideologies of the past and present, as well as speculate about the future. Since the earliest fairy tales, children’s writers have given imaginative interpretation to the darker, riskier side of society, while also offering reassurance, hope, and celebration of the human spirit.

The Congress will address a range of critically important topics, texts, and theories related to the theme of Fear and Safety in Children’s Literature. Confirmed keynote speakers are: Professor Mavis Reimer, Canada Chair in the Culture of Childhood, University of Winnipeg; Professor David Buckingham, Director of the Centre for the Study of Children, Youth and Media, London University (UK); and Professor Gillian Whitlock, University of Queensland (Australia).

Submissions for abstracts open: July 19, 2010

Closing date: November 1, 2010

Please visit the Congress website for details: http://irscl2011.com/.

Call For Papers - Childhoods Conference: Mapping the Landscapes of Childhood

June 22, 2010

Venue: University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada
Date: Thursday, May 5 – Saturday, May 7, 2011

This multidisciplinary conference will engage scholars and practitioners from a wide variety of academic disciplines (including the sciences, arts, humanities, social sciences, policy studies, and education) in a consideration of the state of child studies, which has changed significantly in recent decades. Disciplines long dedicated to the study of the child, and childhood, have been recently revitalized and are engaged with the central problematic of what the child and childhood represent, including how these categories relate to others such as infant and youth. Figured in the plural, childhoods pose a significant crossroads for theoretical and empirical work on the nature of being human and development broadly construed. Various disciplines consider childhood as an experience, as a biological fact, as a social category, as an artistic and literary construct, as a category for historical and demographic analysis, as a category of personhood, and as a locus for human rights and policy interventions. Participating scholars will examine childhoods of the past, present, and future from around the world, and will present research results, policy approaches, and theoretical paradigms that are emergent in this re-engagement with the child and childhood. Bringing together divergent networks of expertise, this conference offers the opportunity for new research collaborations and the scholarly dissemination of innovative research.

Conference Format: three days of multidisciplinary panels with scholarly presentations on conference themes; poster sessions; several keynote events; practitioner sessions; and a film night.

Conference Themes and Questions: definitions and boundaries of childhood: invented or discovered?; indigenous theories and experiences of childhood; the importance of gender; the impact of globalization; the impact of changing technologies on children and childhood, and on the study of children and childhood; concepts of adolescence; vulnerability and empowerment; and health, development, disability, and risk. Proposals for papers on additional themes will also be considered.

Keynote Speakers:

  • Dr. Patrizia Albanese (Co-director of the Centre for Children, Youth and Families, Ryerson University)
  • Dr. Mona Gleason (Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia)
  • Dr. Allison James (Professor of Sociology and Director of the Interdisciplinary Centre of the Social Sciences, University of Sheffield)
  • Dr. Perry Nodelman (Professor Emeritus, Department of English, University of Winnipeg)
  • Dr. Mavis Reimer (Canada Research Chair in the Culture of Childhood and Director of the Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures, University of Winnipeg)
  • Dr. Richard Tremblay (Director, Research Unit on Children’s Psychosocial Maladjustment, University of Montreal)

Submission Guidelines: For presentations, and for posters, please submit a 300 to 500 word proposal/abstract by October 1, 2010 on the conference website: www.uleth.ca/conreg/childhoods/. Proposals for organized panels that are multidisciplinary are also welcome. Please note that presentations should be a maximum of 20 minutes in length. We would especially like to encourage graduate students to contribute posters on their current research and will offer a prize for best student poster.

For more information and to submit abstracts, please see the conference website http://www.uleth.ca/conferences/childhood. For general inquiries, please contact childhoods@uleth.ca.

New Listserve for Childhood Studies

June 3, 2010

The Department of Childhood Studies at Rutgers University-Camden are excited to announce a new listserve catering to the multi-disciplinary field of Childhood Studies. Those of us who study issues around children and childhood are in far flung departments and professions, separated by disciplinary boundaries. This listserve will be a vital point of connection for scholars and practitioners in the multi-disciplinary field and serve a much needed function as a central clearinghouse of information for our disparate field. We welcome calls for papers, announcements of conferences, events, new books, articles and other resources, requests for information, and information on new programs and departments. This list will also provide an opportunity to find people with similar interests across our broad field and open up discussion within it.

To join, please go to: https://email.rutgers.edu/mailman/listinfo/exploring_childhood_studies

Patrick Cox and Anandini Dar Department of Childhood Studies, Rutgers University http://childhood.camden.rutgers.edu/

Folklore Talks at U of W

May 25, 2010

On Wednesday, May 26 (9-10:30 am, 3M61), you’re invited to a special sneak preview of several papers on folklore and gender, presented by UW faculty and students; these talks will be presented at the Folklore Studies Association of Canada meeting this weekend.

The presenters are Marcie Fehr, Kendra Magnusson, Emilie-Anderson Gregoire, Anita Best, Pauline Greenhill, and Catherine Tosenberger. Come and hear discussion of Canadian folk practices, Halloween costumes, and fairy tales!

"…And This Is My Garden" Documentary Screening

May 20, 2010

“… And This is My Garden”, a new documentary from Winnipeg filmmaker Katharina Stieffenhofer, explores an innovative school gardening program that is breaking new ground in education and literally growing a healthier community in the process. The documentary, produced in association with Buffalo Gal Pictures, will screen at Cinematheque May 21 – 23.

“…And This is My Garden” is set in the small northern community of Wabowden, Manitoba, where schoolteacher Eleanor Woitowicz is spearheading an education-based sustainable food movement called the Mel Johnson School Gardening Project. This initiative, based on the Frontier School Division’s science curriculum “Veggie Adventures”, was introduced into the Mel Johnson School in 2006. Woitowicz teaches students how to take care of their own backyard vegetable gardens and reap the rewards of growing their own chemical-free food.

Students develop valuable skills in sustainable food production, healthy lifestyle choices and food preparation, while fostering a sense of responsibility, pride and increased self-esteem. Woitowicz was awarded a Manitoba Excellence in Sustainability Award by the Manitoba Government for her educational efforts in 2009.

The success of the Mel Johnson School Gardening project has already caught the attention of many influential organizations including the David Suzuki Foundation & Manitoba Conservation. On May 5, 2010 - following an invitation by the United Nations - the teachers presented on their Mel Johnson School Gardening Project to the UN Committee on Sustainable Development in New York as one of three projects chosen out of sixty from thirty countries.

Screening: Cinematheque, Art Space Bldg., 100 Arthur Street, Winnipeg, (204) 925-3457
  • Fri May 21, 2010 at 7:00 PM
  • Sat May 22, 2010 at 7:00 PM
  • Sun May 23, 2010 at 4:00 PM

For more information, see: http://www.winnipegfilmgroup.com/cinematheque/and_this_is_my_garden.aspx

New Virtual Canadian Studies Course: Multicultural Ideology in Canadian Children’s Literature

April 16, 2010

The Association for Canadian Studies in German-Speaking Countries is offering an online course on "Multicultural Ideology in Canadian Children’s Literature" for the first time. It will be taught within the framework of its successful program of Virtual Canadian Studies. The course is open to undergraduate as well as graduate students enrolled at any university worldwide (the language of instruction will be English) and will thus offer a great opportunity to participate in an international class and discuss literature from different perspectives. Participants can earn 3 to 7 credit points in this course and - upon successful completion - they will receive a certificate from the Association for Canadian Studies in German-Speaking Countries stating credit points and percentage, which their home universities have to validate in their own system. Registration deadline is April 23; the course will start on May 3 and continue for 12 weeks.

Download the flyer here.

IRSCL Symposium on International Texts for Young People

April 13, 2010

The Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures, in association with the International Research Society for Children’s Literature, will host a symposium on international children’s literature on April 29 from 2:30PM to 4:30PM in 2M70 at the University of Winnipeg.

This symposium will feature talks by IRSCL Board Members, including Dr. Clare Bradford (Australia), Dr. Helene Ehriander (Sweden), Dr. Hans-Heino Ewers (Germany), Dr. Kerry Mallan (Australia), Dr. Rose May Pham Dinh (France), and Dr. Mavis Reimer (Canada). Each scholar will be presenting on trends in texts for young people from his/her own country.

Download the flyer here.

U of W Grad Student Wins ChLA Graduate Essay Award

March 29, 2010

The Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures would like to congratulate University of Winnipeg Graduate Student, Kendra Magnusson on winning the 2010 ChLA Graduate Essay Award.

The judging panel for the 2010 Graduate Student Essay Award sponsored by the Children’s Literature Association has selected Kendra’s essay, "Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events: Daniel Handler and Marketing the Author," as the winner of this year’s master’s level competition.

As a winner of this year’s master’s award, Kendra is invited to present her winning paper at the 2010 ChLA Conference, which will be held in Ann Arbor, Michigan, from June 10-12.

Perry Nodelman Book Signing: The Hunt for the Haunted Elephant

March 26, 2010

Perry Nodelman will be at McNally Robinson Grant Park on April 17 from 2:00PM to 3:30PM to sign his latest children’s book The Hunt for the Haunted Elephant, which he co-wrote with Carol Matas. The Hunt for the Haunted Elephant is the third book in their Ghosthunters series.

The Hunt for the Haunted Elephant

Interested Fictions: What Children’s Literature Can Tell Us - Lecture by Dr. Clare Bradford

March 9, 2010

The Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures is proud to present Dr. Clare Bradford’s lecture, "Interested Fictions: What Children’s Literature Can Tell Us," as part of Inaugural Lecture Series at the University of Winnipeg.

Dr. Bradford is the Visiting Trudeau Fellow at CRYTC.

Date: April 7, 2010
Time: 12:30PM - 1:30PM
Where: 3D01

Refreshments will be served.

Download the event poster here.

ARCYP and YoungCuts present Film ’N Youth at 2010 Congress Film Youth

February 19, 2010

To kick off the Association for Research in Cultures of Young People’s activities at 2010 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences at Concordia University, ARCYP is teaming up with YoungCuts to present Film ’N Youth, a showcase of short films by youth.

Date: May 30, 2010
Time: 4:00PM - 5:30PM
Place: EV 3.760, Concordia University
Cost: Free!

Click here for further details.

ARCYP at 2010 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences

February 19, 2010

The Association for Research in Cultures of Young People will be running an entire day of panel presentations on May 31, 2010 at this year’s Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences at Concordia University.

Join us for three panel sessions (Hope and Change?: Young People’s Cultures and Social Justice, Childhood and Nature, The Child and the City) and a roundtable called Participatory Ontologies and Youth Cultures.

Click here for the complete schedule. Room numbers are TBA.

The Environmental Imagination and Children’s Literature Symposium at University of Toronto

February 4, 2010

THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMAGINATION AND CHILDREN’S LITERATURE will feature renowned children’s authors from Canada, the U.S. and the U.K.: David Almond, M.T. Anderson, Susan Cooper, Sarah Ellis and Tim Wynne-Jones.

They will be joined by Professor Lawrence Buell, Powell M. Cabot Professor of American Literature at Harvard University and Professor Marguerite Holloway, professor of science and environmental issues journalism at the Journalism School, Columbia University.

Academics and university students, writers and illustrators, teachers, librarians, publishers and editors -anyone eager to think hard about children’s literature is invited to this fest of thinking readers and writers. Interested high school students are also welcome.

What makes the imagination in children’s books “environmental”? What do climatologists and botanists, children’s writers and artists, and the playing child have in common? Examining the stuff of which children’s books are made - words and pictures - some of the world’s leading children’s writers and experts on literature will look at the way children’s books create and critique the environment and environmental issues. Why is wilderness necessary in writing as in the natural world? How do miniature characters change a child’s environmental imagination? What happens when fantasy takes on the climate? What do “affluence, effluents, dancing cows, and forty-two pounds of edible fungus” have to do with the child’s relationship to the natural world?

March 5/6, 2010 at Trinity College, University of Toronto

http://www.trinity.utoronto.ca/News_Events/Events/clc.htm

Jeunesse Editor Catherine Tosenberger at MLA’s Chat With An Editor

November 30, 2009

On Monday December 28, Jeunesse editor, Dr. Catherine Tosenberger will be participating in the "Chat with an Editor" session at the MLA Convention in Philadelphia. Dr. Tosenberger will be on from 4:00PM to 5:00PM.

For the past ten years, in an effort to help younger scholars submitting their work to journals, the Council of Editors of Learned Journals, an Allied Organization of MLA, has sponsored "Chat with an Editor" at the MLA Convention. With so many requests from editors and authors to keep this program going, the MLA has stepped forward to officially sponsor these sessions, which will now take place in the room the MLA maintains for certain associated organizations.

The service gives scholars the opportunity to meet one-on-one with an experienced editor to discuss any aspect of the publication process. It is not an article vetting service, but rather a chance for authors to obtain advice on any aspect of writing, submitting, and publishing a journal article, in a neutral and friendly atmosphere. Advisors and advisees will meet in Room 203-B of the Philadelphia Convention Center. (Please note the chats will not take place in the book exhibit hall). In recent years, about half of the advisees have been graduate students and half have been assistant professors, postdocs, adjunct or part-time professors, and independent scholars.

For more information about this event, see here.

CFP: Nationalism(s) and Cultural Memory in Texts of Childhood

October 20, 2009

Deadlines: 15 November 2009 and 1 February 2010

This proposed collection of essays seeks to address the interplay between nationalism (or nationalisms) and cultural memory in a range of texts for or about young people, including books, periodicals, films, television series, games, tourism sites, websites, and archives. The overall collection will be concerned with the ways in which cultural memory is shaped, contested, forgotten, recovered, and (re)circulated, sometimes in opposition to dominant national narratives, featuring young characters and/or targeting young readers who are often assumed not to possess any prior cultural memory. Submissions that examine the circulation of such texts across national borders are particularly welcomed.

Possible topics include:

  • Texts for children and/vs. texts for adults (as well as crossover texts);
  • Transnational co-productions or co-publishing ventures;
  • Textual transformations (adaptations, translations, abridgments, retellings, parodies, fan/slash fictions, authorized or unauthorized sequels and prequels);
  • Depictions of the past and the future (including history/biography, revisionist histories, science fiction and futurism);
  • The circulation of colonial and postcolonial discourses (from empire to colony, or from former colony back to empire);
  • Depictions of war and conflict, particularly contentious historical and political conflicts;
  • The role of food, dress, and festival in the transmission of cultural memory;
  • The cultural production of texts, including branding, genre, and assumptions about gender, race, class, sexuality, religion, and nationality;
  • Reception of texts, either by critics/scholars or by young people.

The collection of essays will be edited by Benjamin Lefebvre, a Leverhulme Visiting Fellow at the University of Worcester. Deadline for 200-word abstracts and bionote: 15 November 2009. Deadline for 20- to 25-page chapters: 1 February 2010. Please direct abstracts to the editor by e-mail: ben@roomofbensown.net. Authors whose work is selected for inclusion in the volume will be invited to present part of their work in progress at a one-day symposium to be held at the University of Worcester in April 2010. Queries are welcomed at any time.

Job Opening: Asst. Professor, Children’s Literature, Kansas State University

October 1, 2009

Assistant Professor

Tenure-track position for specialist in Children’s Literature. Ph.D. in English (ABD considered) with focus on children’s literature required. All children’s literature fields will be considered, but candidates with sub-specialties in ethnic, world, or multi-cultural children’s literature especially encouraged to apply. Teaching responsibilities include undergraduate and graduate courses in children’s and young adult literature; five course per year teaching load. Demonstrated excellence in teaching, evidence of research and publication or its potential required. Commitment to diversity required. The department offers a graduate concentration in children’s literature and a collegial environment for professional development.

Send letter of application, c.v., evidence of teaching effectiveness (sample syllabi, statement of teaching philosophy), and a list of graduate courses completed to Karin Westman, Head, English Dept., ECS Building, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506. (Letters of reference and writing samples will be requested later.) Review of applications begins November 2, 2009 and continues until the position is filled. Kansas State is an equal opportunity employer and actively seeks diversity among its employees.

View the posting on Kansas State University’s English Department website: http://www.k-state.edu/english/positions/

Past Continuous Conference: Historical Fiction For Children

September 25, 2009

Saturday, October 10, 2009

9.30am-5.30pm, Bedson Teaching Centre, Newcastle University

A day-long conference to explore the writing of historical fiction for children, to be held at Newcastle University.

Following the successful acquisition of the Geoffrey Trease and Leon Garfield archives by Seven Stories, and to mark the centenary of Trease’s birth, a one-day conference has been planned to examine all aspects of historical fiction for children. The conference will be of interest to those who write, study or read children’s historical fiction, as well as those who teach history or children’s literature.

View the conference programme here.

Register for the conference here.

Final Call for Nominations for the Schiller Prize for Bibliographical Work on Pre-20th Century Children’s Books Final Notice

September 21, 2009

October 15 2009 is the deadline for nominating monographs, essays, theses, dissertations, or electronic resources published, approved or posted between 1 January 2007 and 1 October 2009 for the 2010 Justin G. Schiller Prize for Bibliographic Work on Pre-20th-Century Children’s Books. The prize is sponsored by the Bibliographical Society of America.

Submissions may concentrate on any children’s books printed before the year 1901 in any country or any language. They should involve research into bibliography and printing history broadly conceived and should focus on the physical book as historical evidence for studying topics such as the history of book production, publication, distribution, collecting, or reading. Studies of the printing, publishing, and allied trades, as these relate to children’s books, are also welcome.

For complete information on the application process, including the submission requirements, visit the homepage of the Bibliographic Society of America (www.bibsocamer.org).

In 2007 the prize was awarded to Lawrence Darton’s “The Dartons: An Annotated Check-list of Children’s Books Issued by Two Publishing Houses 1787-1876” (London: British Library; New Castle, Delaware: Oak Knoll Press, 2004).

Please direct questions to:

Andrea Immel Schiller Prize Coordinator
Curator, Cotsen Children’s Library
Princeton University Library
aimmel@princeton.edu

Call For Papers - Sankofa: A Journal of African Children’s and Young Adult Literature

September 16, 2009

Published annually, Sankofa is a peer-reviewed journal aimed at a diverse audience of teachers, students, librarians, researchers, writers, illustrators, editors, and publishers. Sankofa’s primary objective is to disseminate information on African children’s and young adult literature; recognize common inaccuracies, stereotypes, and biases in books set in Africa; provide readers with in-depth book reviews and scholarly articles on emerging trends in African and African diaspora literatures; and stimulate a global conversation on the comparative patterns in the representation of children in literature.

We invite articles for the following sections of the journal:

  • The African Scene features critical and analytical essays on established and new authors and illustrators, trends and developments in book production for children in Africa, and reviews of outstanding books.
  • Literatures of the Diaspora focuses on children’s and young adult books of the African diaspora.

We also invite articles for a special issue on "Reading and Writing about Crises in Africa." The articles could deal with how African and non-African authors depict war in books for children and young adults; how do children cope with such situations; discussion of books that deconstruct the stereotype of Africa as a place of war or that show African agency; or books that depict other crises such as AIDS.

Please submit articles (in English, between 3,000 and 5,000 words) to:

Dr. Meena Khorana, Editor-in-Chief
202-E Holmes Hall
Morgan State University
1700 E. Cold Spring Lane
Baltimore, MD 21251 USA
Email: meenakh@aol.com

Call For Papers - Childhood and Youth in Transition Conference

September 16, 2009

The University of Sheffield’s Centre For the Study of Childhood and Youth presents its 3rd International Conference from July 6-8, 2010. The theme is Childhood and Youth in Transition, and this is the first call for papers.

In the context of global social, political and economic changes the conference this year will explore the ways in which these broad shifts are having an impact on ideas of childhood and youth and on children’s and young people’s everyday lives. Themes for exploration might include:

  • UNCRC and its aftermath - changes in law and policy
  • Children and young people’s changing citizenship
  • Technological change, new media and consumption
  • Environmental change and children’s futures
  • Economic recession and child poverty
  • Transitions in the life course for children and young people in relation to school and work
  • Health, well-being and the body

This year we also welcome suggestions for small symposia around specific themes. If you wish to organise a symposia, please contact Allison James(allison.james@sheffield.ac.uk).

Plenary speakers:

Professor David Buckingham (Institute of Education, UK)
Professor Martin Woodhead (Open University, UK)
Professor Irene Rizzini, (International Center for Research and Policy on Childhood, Brazil)

Abstracts:

Abstracts of no more than 200 words should be sent to the conference administrator, Dawn Lessels, by January 31, 2010 (d.j.lessels@sheffield.ac.uk).

Venue:

The conference will once again be held in the 4* Kenwood Hall Hotel. This beautiful Victorian Hotel is set in 12 acres of stunning grounds, yet is only a mile from the City Centre. For those choosing to stay at the hotel it also offers free access to the gym, sauna and swimming pool. Wi-fi is available throughout the conference venue.

The conference dinner will take place on Wednesday evening (July 7).

A welcome wine reception and poster session will be held on Tuesday evening (July 6) at Kenwood Hall and opportunities will be available for delegates to participate in the Children’s Film Festival held in Sheffield.

Conference Fees:

Ł250 Full Conference (includes conference fee, all lunches/teas and coffees - Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday)

Ł180 Day rate (includes conference fee, 1 lunch, teas/coffees)

Ł200 Self-funded PhD student (includes conference fee, all lunches/teas/coffees- Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday)

Ł30 Conference dinner (includes meal, wine and transport)

Accommodation:

This is available at the Kenwood Hall Hotel at a special discounted rate of Ł79 per night (Bed and Breakfast). Dinner at the Kenwood will also be available at a reduced rate of Ł20. Other alternative accommodation is also available nearby. All room and dinner bookings should be made directly with the hotels. Details about this can be found on the conference registration form.

Please note that places are limited at this conference so early booking is recommended.

The conference registration form and further details can be found at www.sheffield.ac.uk/cscy.

Call For Papers - Centering Anishinaabeg Studies: Understanding the World Through Stories

September 15, 2009

Centering Anishinaabeg Studies: Understanding the World Through Stories

Editors: Jill Doerfler, Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark, Niigonwedom James Sinclair

Describing how to understand Anishinaabeg cosmology and epistemology in his 1976 book Ojibway Heritage, Basil Johnston writes that "it is in story, fable, legend, and myth that fundamental understandings, insights, and attitudes toward life and human conduct, character, and quality in their diverse forms are embodied and passed on" (7). As scholar Gerald Vizenor remarks in a 1992 interview with Laura Coltelli: "You can’t understand the world without telling a story. There isn’t any center to the world but story" (156).

Responding to calls for tribally-centered critical approaches in American Indian Studies/Native Studies, this critical anthology focuses on Anishinaabeg (Ojibwe/Chippewa) Studies and the ways in which stories might serve as a center for the field. We invite engagement with and employment of the term "story" in its multifaceted meanings. Simply put, the essays in this book will explore and engage with the following questions:

  • Can the field called "Anishinaabeg Studies" use "story" as a center? How?
  • How can stories serve as a methodology within the field of Anishinabeg studies? What kinds of questions can be posed/answered through the use(s) of story?
  • What are the parameters of an Anishinaabeg "story" and how does it participate in ongoing Anishinaabeg knowledge production?
  • What political, ceremonial, and/or intellectual roles does "story" play in the articulation and interests of Anishinaabeg communities?
  • In the current climate of globalization, what are the roles of "story" in moderating multi-dimensional struggles for tribal sovereignty, "traditionalism," and cultural innovation?
  • How might the knowledge embedded within stories be applied to 1) understand the complexities contained within written/oral histories 2) structure social and political institutions, and/or 3) address contemporary challenges facing Anishinaabe communities.

Essays from a wide array of disciplines (including but not limited to history, law, English, anthropology, ecology, linguistics, astronomy, and geography) are desired. Work may consist of an evaluation of practiced critical approaches in the field or exemplify a new approach through an analysis of an Anishinaabeg-authored "story." Contributors are encouraged to examine "texts" in their culturally-specific historical, political, and subjective contexts. Besides conventional, scholarly essays, provocative work that combines Anishinaabeg storytelling and critique are also welcomed.

Due to the nature of the anthology, essays authored by Anishinaabeg are encouraged.

Abstracts must be between 500-750 words and be e-mailed by December 15, 2009. Please include a one-page curriculum vitae/bio. Once accepted, completed essays will be between 5000-7500 words in length, and contributors are asked to keep this in mind. Please e-mail all submissions to hstark@d.umn.edu under the subject line: "Centering Anishinaabeg Studies."

Questions may be emailed to the editors at:

Jill Doerfler
The University of Minnesota - Duluth, doerflj@umn.edu

Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark
The University of Minnesota Duluth, hstark@d.umn.edu

Niigonwedom James Sinclair
The University of British Columbia, niigon@interchange.ubc.ca

Clare BradfordFirst Visiting Trudeau Fellowship Awarded to Dr. Clare Bradford

September 14, 2009

Dr. Clare Bradford has been awarded the first $225, 000 Trudeau Visiting Fellowship Prize from the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation. A professor in the School of Communication and Creative Arts at Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia, Dr. Bradford will be a Visiting Professor of literary studies at The University of Winnipeg in the 2009-2010 academic year, and the Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures will be hosting her. Her innovative research examines the interplay between children’s literature and social practices, and particularly representations of Indigenous peoples and cultures in children’s books.

"Dr. Bradford has been made a Trudeau Fellow because she creatively focuses on contemporary issues of importance to all Canadians and is truly engaged in reshaping our society," announced Trudeau Foundation President, Dr. Pierre-Gerlier Forest.

"The University of Winnipeg has strong links with the Aboriginal community, and strengthening Aboriginal scholarship on campus in all disciplines is critically important," said Dr. Lloyd Axworthy, President & Vice-Chancellor, The University of Winnipeg. "Dr. Bradford’s expertise will be a welcome addition to our students and faculty."

From March to December 2010, Dr. Bradford will be teaching and supervising graduate students, collaborating and networking with scholars in the Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures at the University of Winnipeg, and in the rest of Canada, chairing symposia and conferences and hosting a meeting of the Board of the International Research Society in Children’s Literature.

"The Trudeau Fellowship is an unexpected and wonderful surprise to me, especially as I am the first International Fellow," said Dr. Bradford. "It will enable me to identify and pursue new and innovative areas of research, to learn from my Canadian colleagues at the University of Winnipeg and beyond, and to encourage collaboration among scholars in the field of children’s literature and allied disciplines."

"We will greatly benefit from Dr. Bradford’s presence and involvement on campus," said Dr. Sandra Kirby, Associate Vice-President (Research) and Dean of Graduate Studies. "Her research in children’s texts complements that of our own faculty, and her arrival here is timely, as we are starting a new program, a Master of Arts in English with a Focus in Cultural Studies, that draws on her area of research."

The prestigious $225, 000 Trudeau Fellowships are awarded for a three-year period and include an award and a travel, research and dissemination allowance. Trudeau Fellowships are awarded annually through a rigorous nomination process to highly accomplished Canadians who question society’s worldviews and teach the importance of responsible and engaged citizenship. The Visiting Trudeau Fellowship allows Canadian universities and research institutions to invite an outstanding international or national expert to participate in their activities for a few semesters.

Dr. Bradford is the first ever International Trudeau Fellow and joins four Canadian Trudeau fellows named this year, and Dr. Bradford is the first Trudeau Fellow hosted by the University of Winnipeg.

Adolescence in Canadian Literature: Call For Papers

September 9, 2009

Studies in Canadian Literature/Études en littérature canadienne, published at the University of New Brunswick since 1975, invites submissions to a special issue focusing on depictions of adolescence in Canadian literature, to be edited by Jennifer Andrews, John Clement Ball, Heidi Butler, and Benjamin Lefebvre.

As a transitional stage between childhood and adulthood, adolescence has been deployed as a complex metaphor in the literature of numerous countries, including Canada, which has often been depicted as an adolescent (or emerging) nation. The editors welcome original submissions on Canadian texts from pre-Confederation to the contemporary moment for and/or about adolescents, including literatures from all regions, time periods, and types, including depictions of adolescence that extend the range of thirteen to nineteen in either direction. Interdisciplinary approaches are also welcomed.

Possible topics include:

  • Generic and ideological distinctions between literature for adolescents (the "YA novel") and literature about adolescents
  • Adolescent perspectives and family dynamics, including narration/focalization
  • Adolescent voices and the shaping of cultural memory
  • Adolescent rebellion and cultural citizenship
  • Adolescence and war, crisis, risk, politics/activism, nationhood/nation-building
  • Peer groups’ effects on adolescent maturity
  • Colonial and postcolonial discourses of adolescence
  • The contemporary bildüngsroman and künstlerroman
  • Global vs. local, rural vs. urban adolescences
  • Adolescence and/as performance
  • First Nations, racialized, gendered, queer, and trans adolescences
  • Adolescence in English and French Canadas

Submissions should not be longer than 7,000 words and should conform to the MLA Handbook, 6th edition. Please submit electronically via Word attachment to scl@unb.ca. Deadline for submissions is 30 April 2010, with publication scheduled for late 2010 or early 2011. We welcome submissions in English and in French. For more information, visit the journal’s website at http://journals.hil.unb.ca/index.php/SCL/ or contact Heidi Butler at Heidi.Butler@unb.ca.

Animals and Animality Across the Humanities and Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference: Call For Papers

September 8, 2009

The emergent field of animal and animality studies is rapidly being articulated across scholarly boundaries. We invite graduate students to enter this growing conversation and approach the topic from perspectives reflecting the broad (inter)disciplinarity of this field. Discussions will use critical animal studies as a conceptual lens in order to investigate issues including the boundaries between self and Other, agency and biological drive, and reason and non-reason; the codes that permeate our conceptions of non-human animals; and the implications of troubling and/or making porous the human/animal divide. Is understanding human beings as embodied subjects ontologically bound to our relationship to non-human animals? In what ways is animal wellbeing crucially implicated in how we think ourselves into and against animals? As part of these discussions, we welcome investigations into the ways that (as Val Plumwood contends) animals, nature, and racial, colonial, and gendered Others function, now and historically, as overlapping sites of difference. We also invite considerations of the relationship between the conceptual economy that posits animality as an exploitable trope and forms of Othering that render animals as salable things. In approaching these topics, we encourage participants to consider how animal and animality studies has impacted other theoretical lenses, including critical race theory and feminist, postcolonial, and ecocritical/environmental studies, as well as the attendant politics of our disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to the field.

Topics may include, but are by no means limited to:

  • Thinking with animals/intro-species boundary disruption
  • Becoming animals and biocentric ethics
  • The boundary between domestic and wild, sentiment and terror
  • Making animals "matter" and the role of affect
  • Animal poetry and ecopoetics
  • Animals and the nation in the nineteenth century and beyond
  • Animals and spectacle (both alive and dead)
  • Urban and wild animals and the politics of space
  • Animal geographies and environmental histories
  • Animals and transnational ecologies
  • Speciesm and racism
  • Animals and desire/animality and sexuality
  • Vegetarianism and the politics of meat
  • Animals in language/symbolic animals
  • The discourses and iconography of animals in various cultural forms
  • The uses of animals in war and torture
  • Animal studies now and its future directions

Proposals may reflect traditional and innovative formats, including papers, panels, roundtables, and community dialogues, as well as creative submissions. Please send an abstract of approximately 250 words, along with your name, department, affiliation, and e-mail address to jaime.j.s.denike@queensu.ca. For creative submissions, send 30 lines of poetry or a 300 word excerpt. For information about our call for artistic submissions for our connected Just Act Natural art exhibit, please e-mail visser.lisa@gmail.com.

The deadline for submissions is October 1st, 2009.

Eco-Childhood: The Child, Ecology, and Eco-criticism - Call For Papers for ARCYP Session at 2010 ACCUTE Conference

September 3, 2009

In the new environmental movement there is a great deal of discourse around saving the environment for children. Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth is now a picture book intended to teach young readers about the dangers of global warming. Many environmental groups have created educational programs designed to warn children of our destructive lifestyles. This is not the first time or place in history that the child has been taught about preserving nature, nor is it the first time that a social cause has been justified in terms of an adult duty of care towards children. This panel invites papers that deal with the relationships between the concepts of “the child” and “ecology,” or papers that analyze children’s texts and culture from an eco-critical perspective.

Potential topics include:

  • the role of the study of children’s texts and culture for eco-critics
  • “the child” as an important critical term for ecological criticism
  • the role that assumptions about “the child” play in justifying an adult duty of care towards the environment
  • the ethical implications of the teachings of eco-friendly attitudes to children and youth
  • environmentalism as imagined in youth culture
  • young people as eco-activists

Please submit your 100-word abstract and 50-word biographical note via email to arcyp-admin@uwinnipeg.ca by November 15, 2009.

Download this CFP as a PDF here.

Hope and Change?: Young People’s Cultures and Social Justice - Call For Papers for ARCYP Session at 2010 ACCUTE Conference

September 3, 2009

It is often claimed that young people are our future. “Hope and change” have long been associated with young people, but they have also become shimmering catchphrases in political discourses promising some brighter future. To what extent do current ideas, representations, and/or realities concerning youth and youth cultures offer possibilities for re-imagining current local and global struggles for equality, inclusion, alterity, and progress?

Some possible topics may include:

  • rhetorics of reconciliation
  • children’s rights
  • alternative literacies and/or critical pedagogies
  • discourses of nationhood, progress, security, war and/or terrorism
  • struggles for human/civil rights (disability, gender, race, class, sexuality, etc.)
  • transnationalism and families
  • mobility, space, displacement, and/or homelessness
  • environmental issues
  • DIY, culture jamming, youth culture and subcultures

Please submit your 100-word abstract and 50-word biographical note via email to arcyp-admin@uwinnipeg.ca by November 15, 2009.

Download this CFP as a PDF here.

The Child and the City - Call For Papers For ARCYP Session at 2010 ACCUTE Conference

September 2, 2009

Close to 80% of citizens live in urban spaces in Canada, just one of many nations and regions where urbanization is a primary fact of young people’s lives and where many young people’s identities are defined by their experience of living in cities. With its complex social networks and its ethnic and cultural diversity, the city invites multiple possibilities for self-invention or refashioning. The urban environment shapes how young people, from infants to adolescents, are able to express particular identities, participate in peer culture, and engage with their families. This session aims to address questions of how young people negotiate and create urban spaces and, conversely, how urban spaces accommodate young people.

Possible topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • representations of the urban child
  • the criminalization of youth cultures
  • the surveillence of young people
  • media literacies of the urban child
  • social identities and youth
  • children’s play and public space
  • childhood, youth, and urban lifestyles
  • urban schools
  • postcolonial cities and urban youth
  • cities, globalization and young people
  • young people’s engagement with new technologies in the urban environments
  • GBLT as urban identities
  • homeless youth

Please submit your 100-word abstract and 50-word biographical note via email to arcyp-admin@uwinnipeg.ca by November 15, 2009.

Download this CFP as a PDF here.

Fellowship Programme of the International Youth Library

August 25, 2009

The International Youth Library offers academic fellowships for up to 12 scholars each year. The length of the stay can range from six weeks to four months. Scholars work on research projects that they have already started in their home countries. In the application, scholars must explain the academic relevancy of the project, and demonstrate that access to the collection of the International Youth Library is necessary for completion of the research project because of insufficient access to needed primary and secondary literature in their home countries. Applications from junior scholars are especially welcome.

Application requirements:

  • Academic qualification
  • International focus of research project
  • Sufficient fluency in either Germany or English
  • Non-German citizenship

Deadline for applications: September 30 for a fellowship stay in the following year

For more information:

Download PDF of application information

Website: http://www.ijb.de

Email: direktion@ijb.de

Anthology of World Nonsense: Call For Submissions

August 19, 2009

Announcing: An Anthology of World Nonsense

We seek submissions of translations of verse or prose nonsense literature from cultures outside of Anglo-American tradition. We are collecting folk nonsense of the "High Diddle Diddle" type, literary nonsense of the "Walrus and the Carpenter" type, and pop culture nonsense, such as some Bollywood film lyrics. (For more detail on exactly what we are looking for see below.)

Submission Requirements: Please send original language text (if possible) and a literal, word-for-word, translation. If you also have a more polished English translation, you may submit it. Any explanatory/translation notes would be appreciated.

Deadline: January 15, 2010

Contact:

Michael Heyman, The Berklee College of Music, mheyman@berklee.edu

Kevin Shortsleeve, Chistopher Newport University, k.shortsleeve@cnu.edu

What Nonsense Is:

Nonsense texts usually exist somewhere between perfect sense, on one hand, and absolute gibberish on the other. They achieve this by maintaining a balance between elements that seem to make sense and elements that do not. Nonsense texts often revel in topsy-turvyness and inversions of natural laws or hierarchical laws of order and place. They are chimerical constructions typified by excessive randomness, often celebrating the impossible and playing with temporal and spatial confusion. They ennoble anomaly while simultaneously rejecting the expected, the orderly and the everyday. These characteristics of nonsense create the effect of questioning commonly endorsed systems, such as language and logic. Nonsense seems to allude to an alien and impenetrable alternative system of authority that rejects established order. Nonsense can be poetry or prose, and it can appear in the guise of any genre or form, including but not limited to short story, novel, travel writing, ballad, sonnet, limerick, song, folk rhymes and tales, lullaby, recipe, and alphabet.

What Nonsense is Not:

Nonsense is not riddles. Nonsense is not jokes. Nonsense is not light verse. Most fantasy is not nonsense. Not all nursery rhymes are nonsense. Not all limericks are nonsense (limericks with the "punch line" ending are usually not).

Examples of Nonsense:

The following examples from English tradition point to styles and genres for which we are looking. We seek similarly styled poems and prose nonsense from continental Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Oceania and Central and South America.

Folk Nonsense: Certain nursery rhymes like "Hey Diddle Diddle" which paint unlikely and seemingly meaningless scenarios, or examples of children’s oral folklore like "One Bright Day in the Middle of the Night," which posits a list of impossible juxtapositions.

Examples from folklore like The Brother’s Grimm "Clever Elsie," in which Elsie cannot remember whether she is she, or whether someone else is she. Passages from mummers’ plays and other carnivalesque traditions in which the world is turned upside down and absurdity reigns supreme.

Literary Nonsense: Lewis Carroll’s "Jabberwocky" or "The Hunting of the Snark," Edward Lear’s "Owl and the Pussycat" or "The Four Little Children Who Went Round the World," some of Carl Sandburg’s Rootabaga Stories, Edward Gorey’s The Iron Tonic or The Epileptic Bicycle, John Ciardi’s "Sylvester," Laura Richards’ "Eletelephony," Shel Silverstein’s "If the World Was Crazy."

Some Authors We Are Considering:

(Germany) Christian Morganstern, "The Picket Fence"
(India) Sukumar Ray, "Glibberish-Gibberish"
(South Africa) Nicholas Daly, Wanderer in Og
(Portugal) Fernando Pessoa, "Poema Pial"
(Poland) Stanislaw Baranczak; Jerzy Harasymowicz, "A Green Lowland of Pianos"
(France) Guillaume Apollinaire, "Hat-tomb"
(Norway) Einar Řkland, "Siri, What Shall You Do?", Zinken Hopp, The Magic Chalk
(The Netherlands) Kees Buddingh, "De blauwbilgorgel"
(Czech Republic) Pavel Šrut
(Russia) Evgeny Kluev, Between Two Chairs

To follow the blog for the research and travel associated with this volume, please visit: http://jabberwokabout.blogspot.com.

Call For Papers: The 31st Annual International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts

August 19, 2009

Theme: Race and the Fantastic

Division of Children’s and Young Adult Literature

The 2010 ICFA welcomes paper proposals on all areas of the fantastic (including high fantasy, allegory, science fiction, horror, folk tales, and other traditional literatures, magical realism, the supernatural, and the gothic) in all media (novels, short stories, drama, television, comic books, film, and others).

The division of children’s and young adult literature is especially interested in paper proposals throughout the field, including picture books, easy readers, novels, short stories, film, comic books, and other forms. We embrace a wide variety of scholarly approaches and interests, including genre, historical, theoretical, and textual, models. We encourage work from institutionally-affiliated scholars, independent scholars, international scholars, who work in languages other than English, graduate students, and undergraduate students.

The conference will run March 17-21, 2010, in Orlando, Florida.

Please submit a 250-word abstract directly to the division head, Amie Rose Rotruck, at arotruck@gmail.com. Abstracts should be turned in by October 31, 2009.

The conference encourages graduate student participation and gives an award for outstanding paper by a graduate student each year.

For more information on the conference or other divisions, please visit http://www.iafa.org.

Call For Papers: Frances Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden at 100

August 17, 2009

In honour of the 100th anniversary of Frances Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden, Jackie C. Horne and Joe Sutliff Sanders are soliciting essays for a proposed volume in the Children’s Literature Association’s Centennial Studies Series. The series seeks to re-examine children’s classics from a contemporary perspective. All critical and theoretical approaches are welcome. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The novel in the context of Burnett’s writing for adults
  • The novel in the context of Burnett’s other children’s novels
  • The novel in the context of other children’s literature of the period
  • "Sentimental" and "realistic" constructions of childhood in Burnett’s children’s texts
  • Animal studies and the (tenuous) line between human and animal in the novel
  • "Queerness" and other sexualities
  • Construction of the narrator/narratee
  • Approaching the novel from the perspective of disability theory and the history of disability in Western culture
  • Construction(s) of masculinity
  • Gardening in the period and/or Burnett’s personal history with real-world gardens
  • Re-envisioning the garden metaphor in later children’s texts
  • Precursor texts: return from India narratives (Ewing’s Six to Sixteen, etc.)
  • Constructions of nationality: British, Indian, American
  • Construction of motherhood/mothers and their replacements
  • Mourning customs of the period reflected in/resisted by the novel
  • Burnett and mysticism/religion
  • Ideologies of class in the novel
  • Secrets in the novel - those revealed and those kept
  • The novel’s ending(s)
  • Illustrations/covers for the novel
  • Film adaptations
  • Theatrical productions; Burnett and theatrical copyright law

Deadline for abstracts: January 10, 2010. Completed articles will be due by June 1, 2010. Please send abstracts of 250-500 words by email, with "SECRET GARDEN" in the submission line, to the following editor:

Joe Sutliff Sanders
California State University - San Bernadino
joess@csusb.edu

Red Feather Journal Call For Papers

August 13, 2009

Red Feather facilitates an international dialogue among scholars and professionals through vigorous discussion of the intersections between the child image and the conception of childhood, children’s material culture, children and politics, the child body, and any other conceptions of the child within local, national, and global contexts. The journal invites critical and/or theoretical examination of the child image to further our understanding of the consumption, circulation, and representation of the child throughout the world’s visual mediums.

Some sample topics include, but are certainly not limited to: studies of images of children of colour; child as commodity; images of children in Africa, Asia, Middle East, South America, etc.; political uses of the child image; children in film; children in advertising; visual adaptations of children’s literary works; child welfare images; children and war; or any other critical examination of the child image in a variety of visual mediums.

Red Feather is published twice a year, in February and September, and adheres to the MLA citation system. Authors may submit articles in other citations systems, with the understanding that conversion to MLA is a condition of acceptance.

Interested contributors please submit the paper, an abstract, a current CV, and a brief biography as attachments in Word to debbieo@okstate.edu.

Deadline for submissions for the premier issue is December 15, 2009.

L.M. Montgomery and the Matter of Nature: 9th International Conference

July 20, 2009

At the ninth biennial conference hosted by the L.M. Montgomery Institute (University of Prince Edward Island), we invite you to consider L.M. Montgomery and the matter of nature. In recent years, the matter of nature has been the subject of much contested debate and theoretical innovation across disciplines. While multiple romanticisms have informed L.M. Montgomery's passionate views of the natural world, her complex descriptions show her writing both of and for nature. This complexity extends as well to the depiction of cultural and gendered mores (domesticity, friendship, faith, community, biological determinism) as both natural and cultural. In all its forms, nature situates binary relationships that are often represented as hierarchical and oppositional: nature and culture; child and adult; animal and human; female and male; emotion and reason; body and mind; traditional and modern; raw and cooked; wild and domestic; rural and urban.

We invite the submission of abstracts that consider these issues in relation to Montgomery’s fiction, poetry, life writing, photographs, and scrapbooks, as well as the range of adapted texts in areas of film, television, theatre, tourism, and online communities. Possible questions include:

  • What are the effects of the representations and images of nature that are crafted and circulated in Montgomery’s work?
  • How do Mongomery’s narrations of nature shape children and adults within and across cultures?
  • How do particular constructions of nature work in fiction, across such differences as gender, race, culture, and class?
  • What are the cultural and historical contingencies surrounding nature in Montgomery’s work?
  • What does it mean to consider Montgomery as a "green" writer (Doody) or as a proto-ecofeminist (Holmes)?
  • What do Montgomery’s provocative readings of nature offer us at a time of environmental crises and ecological preoccupations?
  • How does the notion of "nature" impact some of the most central preoccupations in Montgomery’s fiction, poetry, and life writing (the nature of war, of mental illness, of cultural inheritance, of conflict, of same-sex friendships and of heterosexual marriage, of cultural memory, of national ideologies)?
  • Abstracts should clearly articulate the paper’s argument and demonstrate familiarity with current scholarship in the field (please see http://lmmresearch.org/bibliography for an updated bibliography). For more information, please contact the conference co-chairs directly: Dr. Benjamin Lefebvre (ben@roomofbensown.net and Dr. Jean Mitchell (mjmitchell@upei.ca). All proposals will be vetted blind and should therefore contain no identifying information.

    Please submit one-page abstracts and short biographical sketches by 15 September 2009 to the L.M. Montgomery Institute’s OCS page (http://ocs.vre.upei.ca/index.php/lmmi/2010).

    If you’ve already submitted an abstract for the 2010 Conference, please verify that it has been received by emailing the director at lmmi@upei.ca. All those who were registered through the 2008 OCS page have been made authors and should go to http://ocs.vre.upei.ca/index.php/lmmi/2010/presenter/submit/1 to submit their abstracts. If you were registered, but have forgotten your password, please use the Reset Password link located here: http://ocs.vre.upei.ca/index.php/lmmi/2010/login/lostPassword. If this is your first time using OCS for the L.M. Montgomery Conference, then please register yourself as an author here: http://ocs.vre.upei.ca/index.php/lmmi/2010/user/account?source=&requiresPresenter (make sure to select the "Create account as Author: Able to submit items to the conference" option at the bottom of the registration form).

The (Im)Possibility of Children's Fiction: Rose 25 Years On

July 17, 2009

Jacqueline Rose's The Case of Peter Pan, or The Impossibility of Children's Fiction first appeared in 1984, at a time when the study of children's literature was just beginning to take off in academic departments. It was a formidable gauntlet, lauded by some, castigated by others, and mistunderstood by many, but it has more than stood the test of time. Twenty-five years on, it is still one of the most quoted books in children's literature criticism.

To mark this occasion, a special issue of Children's Literature Association Quarterly will be devoted to a reconsideration of Rose's "case." Papers are invited on any aspect of her thesis, including (but not limited to):

  • the theoretical roots of Rose's "case"
  • the work's overall validity (is children's fiction utterly impossible, partially possible, or neither of the above?)
  • its current relevance (has it been superseded by later theoretical developments, or are her ideas as pertinent as ever?)
  • its relevance to other texts (is Peter Pan exemplary or exceptional? can one "apply" Rose's ideas?)
  • does her thesis apply to children's fiction only, or to other areas of children's literature and culture (e.g. poetry, drama, non-fiction, film, toys, computer games)?

Please send your papers (which should conform to the usual house-style of ChLAQ, and be between 5000-7000 words in length) to both guest editors, David Rudd (d.rudd@bolton.ac.uk) and Anthony Pavlik (cb2007@boun.edu.tr), by November 1, 2009.

The selected articles will appear in ChLAQ, Fall 2010.

World Summit Banner

World Summit on Media for Children and Youth 2010

July 13, 2009

The 2010 World Summit on Media for Children and Youth in Karstad, Sweden will be a summit for 2000 delegates from 100 countries with a focus on preparing with children for a new media world in the twenty-first century. It will offer opportunities to network, to be part of debates, to be interactive and to be part of workshops, sharing perspective, experience and expertise. World Summit in Karlstad will take place June 14-18, 2010. For more information and to subscribe to the news, see the World Summit website: http://www.wskarlstad2010.se/

Liverpool John Moores University Call For Papers

July 9, 2009

LJMU's first international conference on The Theory and Practice of Working With Children and Young People is taking place from October 21 to 23, 2009 in Liverpool. The five conference themes are:
  • Participation
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Globalisation and Risk
  • Higher Education
  • Evidence-Based Practice
The link to the conference website, with further details and the call for papers and posters is http://www.ljmu.ac.uk/HEA/news/wwcypconf/. If you would like any further information on the conference, you can contact us at 0151 231 8175 or email wwcayp-enquiries@ljmu.ac.uk.

Benjamin Lefebvre Awarded Leverhulme Visiting Fellowship

June 24, 2009

Nominated as an affiliate of the Centre for Research in Young People's Texts and Cultures, Benjamin Lefebvre has been awarded a Leverhulme Visiting Fellowship to be taken up at the University of Worcester from August 2009 to May 2010.

Exploring Childhood Studies Conference Call For Papers

June 17, 2009

Department of Childhood Studies
Rutgers University, Camden

The graduate students of the Department of Childhood Studies at Rutgers University, Camden invite submissions for papers and poster presentations for their first formal graduate student conference on April 9, 2010. Graduate students from all disciplines who are engaged in research relating to children and childhood are encouraged to submit proposals.

The field of childhood studies engages in both theoretical and empirical study of children and childhood within historical, contemporary, interdisciplinary, multi-cultural, state, national, and global contexts. Each combination of perspectives provides new insights into the lives of children and the families, cultures, and societies in which they are embedded. The interdisciplinary nature of the field is one of its greatest strengths and the core of its remarkable potential for scholarly advancement, but also leaves the field open for exploration and interrogation, and its borders difficult, if not impossible, to define.

The Exploring Childhood Studies conference proposes defining Childhood Studies by "doing" childhood studies; the conference will explore the field by offering explorations within it. We seek papers from all disciplines that keep childhood as a construct, children as a category, or the child as a real living human as their central focus, providing critical thought and insight while locating them in different contexts, fields, and ideologies.

In keeping with what we believe is the essential interdisciplinary nature of Childhood Studies, this conference seeks to be interdisciplinary itself. We seek proposals from all disciplines-education, literature, economics, psychology, sociology, anthropology, law, political science, history, criminology, philosophy, medicine, religion, film studies, and cultural studies-as well as interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary scholarly work.

The range of open topics within this field is as broad as the contexts of the experiences of children and childhood: war, health, rights, gender, poverty, wealth, policy, ethics, popular culture, globalization, school, family, home, sexuality, community, and representations in all modes of fiction. The field of Childhood Studies itself is open to interrogation.

Selected papers will be grouped into panels that may be based around discipline, theme, or perspective, but will demonstrate the common grounding of the papers in their mutual exploration of children and childhood studies.

Paper presentations should be limited to 20 minutes in length. Please send 250-word abstract for paper or poster presentation (specify which) and cover letter with name, current level of graduate study, affiliated university, and email address to m_modica@vfcc.edu. Include the words "conference abstract" in subject line, and include name on the cover letter only.

For further information about the Exploring Childhood Studies Conference, contact: Patrick Cox at ptcox@camden.rutgers.edu or Anandini Dar at anandini@camden.rutgers.edu.

Deadline for submission is October 31, 2009. Accepted presenters will receive email notification by January 10, 2010.

Literary Eclectic V Revised Call for Papers

June 16, 2009

Submissions on any aspect of English literary studies are invited for the fifth English graduate students' conference organized by the University of Regina and the University of Saskatchewan, to be held in Regina September 25 and 26. Honours students are also encouraged to submit papers. We also hope that we can consider some creative pieces. Faculty members in the Department of English will select the essays that will be presented at the conference. Papers should be no longer than 20 minutes (8-9 pages, double-spaced).

This year's keynote speaker is Dr. Warren Cariou, Canada Research Chair and Director, Centre for Creative Writing and Oral Culture, University of Manitoba. His working title is “Junk: Waste Culture, Addiction, and the Ends of the World."

The deadline for submissions is July 3, 2009. Later submissions may be entertained. Participants must pre-register. Forms for that purpose are being prepared.

Please send papers, with contact information, to:

K. G. Probert
Graduate Chair
ken.probert@uregina.ca

Magic World Of Czech Illustrators For Children At The Manitoba Children's Museum

June 15, 2009

The Embassy of the Czech Republic and the Manitoba Children's Museum in cooperation with the Czechoslovak Benevolent Association and Czech and Slovak Association of Canada are proud to present a special exhibition of the best 20th Century Czech illustrators for children.

Around 90 illustrations by 18 artists covering all genres of literature for children will be featured, ranging from Czech literature to numerous fairy tales and stories from Europe, China, India and the Arab world, which are a part of the world literature heritage for children. Together with the illustrations, animated films on DVD will be available for viewing.

On Wednesday, June 17, at 2:00PM, this special exhibition will have its official opening at the Manitoba Children's Museum. Then, until June 30, you can visit this exhibit during hours of operation: Monday to Thursday, 9:30AM to 4:30PM and Friday and Saturday, 9:30AM to 6:00PM.

ARCYP Calls for Papers for Congress 2009Call for Papers: International Research in Children's LiteraturePapers: International Research in Children's Literature

Vol. II, Issue 2 (to be published December 2009), entitled'Internationalisation, Transculturalism and Globalisation:Manifestations in Children's Literature and Film'. The deadline for thereceipt of submissions for consideration is 28 February 2009. Full details here

Some Day Your Witch Will ComeRelease of Kay Stone's Some Day Your Witch Will Come

(Fall 2008)

A selection of Kay Stone's scholarly articles and books spanning 1975-2004. The volume contains reflections on the value of fairy tales as adult literature. The title Some Day Your Witch Will Come twists a Walt Disney lyric to challenge the typical fairy-tale framework and is a nod to Stone's innovative and sometimes unconventional perspective. As a whole, this collection is a fascinating look at both the evolution of a career and the recent history of fairy-tale scholarship. To find out more or to order, click HERE.

Students: Publish with JACK!


Do you have an undergraduate research essay or critical review you are particularly proud of? Do you think maybe it could be improved or published? The Faculty of Arts new "Journal of the Arts through Combined Knowledge" wants your submissions. Click HERE for more information.

The Hidden AdultRelease of Perry Nodelman's The Hidden Adult: Defining Children's Literature

August 2008


What exactly is a children's book? How is children's literature defined as a genre? Nodelman presents close readings of six classic stories to answer these questions and offer a clear definition of children's writing as a distinct literary form.

For more information or ordering, click HERE.

IRSCL LogoRelease of Home Words: Discourses of Children's Literature in Canada
Literature in Canada
(March 2008)

(March 2008)


The eleven essays in Home Words explore the complexity of the idea of “home" through various theoretical lenses and various groupings of books, each considering the ways in which discourses of home underwrite both children's literature and national literatures. Home Words reconfigures the field of Canadian children's literature as it is usually represented, by setting the study of English-language and French-language texts side by side, and by paying sustained attention to the work of Aboriginal Canadian writers for children and the writing of "new Canadians" of colour.

University of Winnipeg contributors include: Mavis Reimer, Anne Rusnak, Doris Wolf, Paul DePasquale, Perry Nodelman, Deborah Schnitzer, and Neil Besner.

Click here for more information.

Book Release Announcement:

Radical Children's Literature: Future Visions and Aesthetic Transformations in Juvenile Fiction

Kimberley Reynolds's new book, Radical Children's Literature: Future Visions and Aesthetic Transformations in Juvenile Fiction (Palgrave MacMillan) reappraises the place of children's literature in culture, showing it to be a creative space where writers and illustrators try out new ideas - about books, society, and the possibilities for narrative in an age of instant communication and multi-media. It looks at the stories young people are given about the world and themselves, and how these interact with changing childhoods and new technologies.

Divided Worlds: Studies in Children's Literature

As well, the new book edited by Mary Shine Thompson and Valerie Coghlan, Divided Worlds: Studies in Children's Literature, has been released. This volume, the third collection of studies in children's literature, explores the political, social and cultural divisions that dominate children's books, ranging over Irish and international topics and texts. Articles on the fi ction of Katherine Tynan, Maria Edgeworth and Somerville & Ross, as well as modern Ulster fi ction and contemporary children's publishing, are indicative of the range of Irish material. The international focus extends from Luigi Bertelli's treatment of fascism and Gianni Rodari's communism to the English contexts of Cecil Alexander's English hymns. Rosemary Sutcliffe's Roman Britain series is revisited to explore its masculinities, and gendered divisions are the subject of a review of Oisin McGann's recent fantasy fiction.

`

Book Release Announcement:

Unsettling Narratives:Postcolonial Readings of Children's Literature

Children's books seek to assist children to understand themselves and their world. Unsettling Narratives: Postcolonial Readings of Children's Literature demonstrates how settler-society texts position child readers as citizens of postcolonial nations, how they represent the colonial past to modern readers, what they propose about race relations, and how they conceptualize systems of power and government.

Clare Bradford focuses on texts produced since 1980 in Canada, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand and includes picture books, novels, and films by Indigenous and non-Indigenous publishers and producers. From extensive readings, the author focuses on key works to produce a thorough analysis rather than a survey. Unsettling Narratives opens up an area of scholarship and discussion—the use of postcolonial theories—relatively new to the field of children's literature and demonstrates that many texts recycle the colonial discourses naturalized within mainstream cultures.

For more information, click here.

Seven Stories Collection Available Online

The following catalogues from the Seven Stories Collection are now available online. Seven Stories is a collection of original artwork and manuscripts which records the creative process involved in making a children's book and provides an insight into the working lives of authors and illustrators. Seven Stories is the only place in the UK which is actively collecting original artwork by British writers and illustrators for children. The online collections are available initially via the A2A website (www.a2a.org.uk):

Pat and Laurence Hutchins Collection
Johnstone Memorial Collection
Philip Pullman Collection
Sylvia Waugh Collection
Robert Westall Collection

In addition, the Kaye Webb Collection catalogue will become available fromSeptember. In the near future, all catalogues will become available directlyvia Seven Stories' own website (http://www.sevenstories.org.uk/home/).

As indicated on the A2A website, enquiries to view material should bedirected to the Collections Team at Seven Stories (collections@sevenstories.org.uk).

Writing Through Race

Paul Yee, David Chariandry, and Lawrence Hill

Friday, 28 September 2007 from 2:30 to 4:00 p.m.
Eckhardt-Gramattè Hall, third floor, University of Winnipeg

Writing Through Race, an upcoming panel presented by the University of Winnipeg and the Winnipeg International Writers Festival, will include Paul Yee, author of prizewinning children's books Ghost Train, Roses Sing on New Snow, and Tales from Gold Mountain. Yee's work also includes Saltwater City: The Story of Vancouver's Chinese Community.

Other panelists include David Chariandry (Soucouyant) and Lawrence Hill (The Book of Negroes).

University of Winnipeg to offer Master of Arts in English with a focus on Cultural Studies

Addressing the link between culture and the arts, and the social, economic and political milieu, this program will address five related areas:

  • cultural theory
  • cultures of childhood
  • gender, sexuality and culture
  • global and local culture
  • manuscript, print and digital culture.

The program will build upon existing and growing strengths at The University of Winnipeg, including its most recent Canada Research Chair in the Cultures of Childhood.

Cultures of Childhood

Courses in this area investigate historical and contemporary cultural discourses in texts that use the figures of "the child," "the boy," and "the girl" as important rhetorical strategies--not only print texts, but also Internet texts, films, TV texts, texts of material culture such as toys and video games, as well as oral texts such as family stories and schoolyard games. Studying texts designed for young readers, in particular, allows for theoretical investigations into the manufacture of consent in liberal democratic cultures.

This area of concentration is supported by the presence of the Canada Research Chair in the Culture of Childhood in the Department of English and the related Centre for Research in Young People's Texts and Cultures.

Watch this space for further announcements.

If you have questions regarding Cultures of Childhood, please contact Professor Mavis Reimer at 786-9185 or m.reimer@uwinnipeg.ca

For general inquiries regarding the program contact Professor Alden Turner at786-9283 or a.turner@uwinnipeg.ca

For more information about graduate programs at the University of Winnipeg follow this link:http://www.uwinnipeg.ca/index/grad-studies-programs

Press release from The Swedish Institute for Children's Books

New double issue of Barnboken - Journal of children's literature research

Astrid Lindgren: Always on the child's side In May 2007 The Swedish Institute for Children's Books (SBI) arranged an international conference, Astrid Lindgren Centennial Conference. "The Liberated Child-Childhood in the Works of Astrid Lindgren". In this issue, ten of the papers presented at the conference are published and an introduction by prof. Maria Nikoljaeva. The papers contain different aspects of Astrid Lindgren's works and authorship.

Language: English

Contents:Introduction: Astrid Lindgren - famous and unknown, Maria Nikolajeva, Sweden
Always on the child's side, Ulla Lundqvist, SwedenPippi Longstocking and the father of enjoyment, Karen Coats, USAInternational politics in Astrid Lindgren's works, Astrid Surmatz, Holland. The animal figure in Astrid Lindgren's work, David Rudd, EnglandFrom illustrated text to picturebook. Astrid Lindgren's "Mirabelle", Agnes-Margrethe Bjorvand, Norway the animated still life. Ingrid Vang Nyman's use of self-contradictory spatial order in Pippi Longstocking, Elina Druker, SwedenStepping into the dark. Mourning in Astrid Lindgren's The Brothers Lionheart, Alan Richards, CanadaHarnessing the monstrous. The dark side of Astrid Lindgren, Carole Scott, USAThe vanished land of childhood. Autobiographical narration in Astrid Lindgren's work,Bettina Kümmerling-Meibauer, Germany, Pippi and Ronia. Astrid Lindgren's light and dark pastoral, Roni Natov, USA

Contact information: Mats Näslund, mats.naslund@sbi.kb.se/+46(0)8-54 54 20 56Subscriptions: SEK 120 per year. Foreign subscriptions SEK 200 per year. Single issues SEK 70, this issue SEK 140 (foreign SEK 200).SBI publishes the journal Barnboken, issued twice a year - the only Swedish scholarly journal on children's literature. Each issue offers articles and papers on subjects of current interest. In addition to the research papers Barnboken includes reviews of recent publications on children's literature research. Contributions are written by specialists in the field, and reviewed by a panel of experts. Barnboken is usually published in Swedish with an English summary.

Canadian Ethnic Studies Association

There will be a panel on children's literature at the Canadian Ethnic Studies Association conference taking place this weekend at the Hotel Fort Garry in Winnipeg.On Saturday, from 4:00 - 5:15 p.m. (Session W, no room specified as yet), there is a session entitled What do we tell the Children?: Immigration, Race, and Historical Trauma in Canadian Children's Literature.

Speakers include:
Mavis Reimer: "Making it Home: Manufacturing Consent in Canadian Children's Literature";
Louise Saldanha: "Making Critical Space: Reflections on Race, Children's Literature, and Canada":
Adrienne Kertzer (U of Calgary): "Historical Trauma and Ethnicity in William Bell's Young Adult Fiction."

For more information follow this link:http://cesa.uwinnipeg.ca

University of Winnipeg English Department

The Department of English at the University of Winnipeg invites applications for a probationary, tenure-track appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor with specialization in the field of Young People's Texts and Cultures, particularly in the areas of new media texts, game texts, or the culture of online communities. The ability to contribute to other teaching strengths of the Department at undergraduate and graduate levels will be considered an asset. Such areas include First-Year courses, Creative Writing, Canadian Literature, Literary and Cultural Theory, Popular Literature, and Gender Studies. Subject to budgetary approval, this appointment will begin July 1, 2008. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. A completed Ph.D. and a demonstrated commitment to research and teaching are required.

The University of Winnipeg is an urban, primarily undergraduate university that seeks to appreciate, foster and promote values of human dignity, equality, non-discrimination, and diversity. The University is committed to employment equity, to being a place of learning and work that includes all qualified individuals, including women and men, members of visible minorities, Aboriginal persons, people of all sexualities and genders, and persons with disabilities. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply, but qualified Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada are given priority.

Deadline for submission of applications is Monday, October 15, 2007. Interested applicants should send a letter of application (including the names of their three referees), a curriculum vitae, and a writing sample (25 page max.), and have three confidential letters of reference sent directly to Dr. Murray Evans, Chair, Department of English, University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 2E9, CANADA.

International Research in Children's Literature

Invitation for reviews and review copies. Publishers and authors are therefore kindly invited to send books for review, as well as leaflets and suggestions for books to the Reviews Editor, Vanessa Joosen.(see more)

"Freud in Oz" - Dr. Kenneth Kidd

Click here to read the text of Kenneth Kidd talk on the entanglements of children's literature and psychoanalysis, from analytical and therapeutic interest in fairy tales, such as Bruno Bettelheim's The Uses of Enchantment, to psychobiographies of Golden Age fantasists such as Lewis Carroll and J. M. Barrie, to the emergence in the twentieth-century of the children's author as child expert.
Watch this space for the video, which will be posted soon!
Dr. Kenneth Kidd's Website
(see more)

Joint Sessions with the Association for Research in Young People's Texts and Cultures[ARYPTC], Continued

Round Table on Child Studies, Children's Studies, Childhood Studies, and Children's Cultural Studies: Producing a Field of Study

Round Table on Child Studies, Children's Studies, Childhood Studies, and Children's Cultural Studies: Producing a Field of Study

In Scandinavia, Britain, the United States, and now Canada, the emerging field of "children's and childhood studies" has been gathering a critical mass: indeed, the birth of the Association for Research in Young People' Texts and Cultures is evidence of the growth of such multidisciplinary and sometimes interdisciplinary research about children, childhood, and children's culture.(see more)

Joint Sessions with the Association for Research in Young People's Textsand Cultures [ARYPTC]

Shifting Borders of Childhood, Youth, and Adulthood

Shifting Borders of Childhood, Youth, and Adulthood

Although under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, children are defined as human beings under the age of eighteen, "childhood," "youth," and "adulthood" are defined very differently in various contexts--all of which have consequences for actual children and young people.
(see more)

Joint Session with the Victorian Studies Association of Western Canada [VSAWC] Victorian Children

Please send proposals and a completed copy of the ACCUTE Proposal Submission Information Sheet, http://www.accute.ca/Conference.htm., (Proposals are blind-vetted and should not include identification) and a 1-page cv (including e-mail and return address) by 15 November 2007 to Dr. Kristen Guest
(see more)

MTYP ANNOUNCES A SERIES OF WORKSHOPS on WRITING FOR YOUNG AUDIENCES LED BY HERBIE BARNES, MTYP'S NEW ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE


MTYP's new Artist-in-Residence, Herbie Barnes, invites submissions for his upcoming series of intensive workshops on creating plays specifically for young people. An Ontario-based director, writer, actor and teacher, Barnes has worked extensively in television, film and theatre, including numerous engagements with MTYP. The residency, which is supported by the Canada Council for the Arts, continues through October 2008. The workshops will be led by Barnes through the support of Manitoba Theatre for Young People.

Up to ten writers will be invited to participate in three development sessions to be held at MTYP in the summer and fall. Participation is invited from both new and emerging writers. The sessions will concentrate on the structure of story and narrative, writing technique, and the distinguishing features of theatre for young audiences (TYA). The final workshop will focus on script development and include collaboration from a professional design and directing team, with the goal of producing draft scripts.

The workshops will be held on the following dates at Manitoba Theatre for Young People: June 10 -20, 2008
August 18-22, 2008
September 22-26, 2008

Those interested in applying should submit a writing sample (2-3 page piece of fiction) by email to Rose Condo, rcondo@mtyp.ca at MTYP by April 14, 2008. Interviews to select participants will be held from April 21to 23. For more information, please contact Rose by email or at (204) 947-0394 ext. 234.

British Books for Children and Adolescents 1470-1770


Ruth B. Bottigheimer has posted a 300+ page (in its print-out form) bibliography of British Books for Children and Adolescents 1470-1770 for the use of fellow scholars of children's literature. The bibliography includes instructional manuals and school textbooks along with customarily cited books of manners, religious instruction, and chapbooks. In some cases the fingerprints of the books are included, so that a book's print run can be identified separately from its title-page information.

A brief essay on the parameters of the bibliography touches on the types of material in the bibliography, the meaning of "children" and "adolescents" in the context of the bibliography, the question of successive editions, a book's fingerprint, edition number, print runs, dating, titles, authors, printers, publishers, place of publication for early British children's books, genre, illustrations, measurements, readership, format, location, and observations about individual books. A bibliography like this can never be complete, and additional information from users will be incorporated on an annual basis.

The bibliography can be accessed at this address: http://hdl.handle.net/1951/43009