Issue 9.2 of Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures Out Now

Jeunesse 9.2 Cover

Issue 9.2 of Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures is now available. This issue includes:

Editorial

New Directions
Heather Snell

Special Section on Youngsters

Introduction to Special Section, Youngsters: On the Cultures of Children and Youth
Naomi Hamer, Stuart Poyntz

Things to Do with Your Imaginary Child
Steven Bruhm

Singing and Dancing “Their Bit” for the Nation: Canadian Children’s Performances for Charity circa the First World War
Heather Fitzsimmons Frey

The Politics of Voice in Tween Girls’ Music Criticism
Diane Pecknold

Articles

“Because That’s What We Do . . . We Sit and We Drink and We Talk”: Stories and Storytelling among Street-Involved Youth
Lisa Mitchell, Marion Selfridge

Digital Piracy, Digital Practices: Changing Discourse on Young People and Downloading in Canadian Newspapers
Heather Osborne

Constructing the Twentieth-Century Child: Postcolonial Retellings of Estevanico from Cabeza de Vaca’s La Relación
Cristina Rhodes

Review Essays

Revisiting The Shocking Truth About Indians in Textbooks
Sean Carleton

Stories about Strength and Disability: How We Get Along
Nicole Markotić

Teen Bedrooms as Sites of Self-Actualization and Containment
Mary-Ann Shantz

Childhood Studies Goes to War
Ashley Henrickson

Deeply Rooted in Our History
Melanie Morin-Pelletier

Introduction to Seriality and Texts for Young People Published in Jahrbuch der Gesellschaft für Kinder- und Jugendliteraturforschung

Jahrbuch Flucht und Migration Cover

The introduction to Seriality and Texts for Young People: The Compulsion to Repeat edited by Mavis Reimer, Nyala Ali, Deanna England, and Melanie Dennis Unrau, a 2014 collection of essays based on a symposium hosted by the Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures in 2011, has been updated and published in the Jahrbuch der Gesellschaft für Kinder- und Jugendliteraturforschung.

The inaugural issue of the new Jahrbuch der Gesellschaft für Kinder- und Jugendliteraturforschung (Yearbook of the German Children’s Literature Research Society [GKJF]) succeeds the print annual journal Kinder- und Jugendliteraturforschung (1995-2015) in a fundamentally revised form. As the GKJF’s response to the rapid development of digital culture(s) and reflecting its open, democratic attitude towards use of knowledge resources, the Yearbook is now published as an online, open-access, peer-reviewed journal.

Special Issue of Papers: Explorations into Children’s Literature on Children’s Literature Collections and Archives

Papers Logo

A special issue of Papers: Explorations into Children’s Literature on Children’s Literature Collections and Archives is out now.

This issue is available (free open access) at: http://www.paperschildlit.com/index.php/papers.

Table of Contents

  • The Osborne Collection of Early Children’s Books: Toronto Public Library’s Research Collection of Juvenile Material Leslie Anne McGrath
  • Twentieth century literary and publishing archives: UK research perspectives on children’s literature Charlotte Berry
  • Colonial Girls’ Literature and the Politics of Archives in the Digital Age Michelle J. Smith and Kristine Moruzi
  • Anthony Arrowroot and Nutty Nutella: Advertising in Children’s Literature Afsana Khan
  • The Historical-Cultural Value of the Juvenile Collection: The McLaren Collection at the University of Melbourne and its Girls’ Books Margaret Lowe
  • John Mystery and the Australian Book Trade Juliet O’Conor
  • Astrid Lindgren and the Archives Helene Ehriander
  • A Token to the Future: A Digital “Archive” of Early Australian Children’s Literature Kerry Mallan, Amy Cross, and Cherie Allan
  • Digital Archives and Cultural Memory: Discovering Lost Histories in Digitised Australian Children’s Literature 1851-1945 Michelle Dicinoski
  • The Lu Rees Archives of Australian Children’s Literature Belle Alderman
  • Collections of the Swiss Institute for Children’s and Youth Media and their Public Access Roger Meyer
  • Growing up Australian: The National Imaginary in School Readers Jane McGennisken
  • Books or Toys? A Traveller’s tale: researching early movable books for and by children in material and virtual collections Jacqueline Reid-Walsh

Online Bibliography of British Books for Children and Adolescents 1470-1770

Publication Icon

Ruth B. Bottigheimer has posted a 300+ page (in its print-out form) bibliography of British Books for Children and Adolescents 1470-1770 for the use of fellow scholars of children’s literature. The bibliography includes instructional manuals and school textbooks along with customarily cited books of manners, religious instruction, and chapbooks. In some cases the fingerprints of the books are included, so that a book’s print run can be identified separately from its title-page information.

A brief essay on the parameters of the bibliography touches on the types of material in the bibliography, the meaning of “children” and “adolescents” in the context of the bibliography, the question of successive editions, a book’s fingerprint, edition number, print runs, dating, titles, authors, printers, publishers, place of publication for early British children’s books, genre, illustrations, measurements, readership, format, location, and observations about individual books. A bibliography like this can never be complete, and additional information from users will be incorporated on an annual basis.

The bibliography can be accessed at this address: http://hdl.handle.net/1951/43009.