2015 Children’s Literature in Education Emerging Scholar Award Call for Applications

During its long history, the journal Children’s Literature in Education has often benefited from the refreshing ideas and original approaches of young and new scholars in the field of children’s literature. In the current academic climate, the Humanities are under financial pressure in various countries. The competition for (post)doctoral scholarships is keen and tenured positions are becoming rare. CLE, with the support of its publisher, Springer, therefore launched the Children’s Literature in Education Emerging Scholar Award (CLEESA) in 2013, which will run annually.

We are pleased to announce that the 2014 Children’s Literature in Education Emerging Scholar Award has been presented to Meagan Lacy, an Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Information Literacy Services & Instruction at Stella and Charles Guttman Community College, a CUNY school in New York, New York, for her essay “Portraits of Children of Alcoholics: Stories that Add Hope to Hope,” which will be published in the December 2015 issue of CLE.

Each year, the prestigious winner receives a prize of $500 and their article is published exclusively in Children’s Literature in Education, with an appropriate acknowledgement of its award-winning status. Excellent essays that do not win the award will still be considered for publication in CLE.

Applicants must submit an essay of 6-8,000 words to the Children’s Literature in Education website before 31 December 2015 (http://www.editorialmanager.com/clid/). For anyone unfamiliar with the journal, details and a preview can be found there, together with a PDF guide to the journal’s house style: http://www.springer.com/education+%26+language/linguistics/journal/10583?detailsPage=pltci_1060388. All submitted articles must conform to this house style.

Submissions must be original works that have not been published previously (including in conference proceedings) and that are not currently under consideration with another journal or edited collection.

For the purpose of eligibility for this award, an Emerging Scholar is defined as someone who meets the following criteria:

  • has not defended a Ph.D. before 31 December 2012
  • has not published books, chapters or peer-reviewed articles on children’s literature before 31 December 2010

Submissions should be accompanied by a brief note indicating that the article is to be considered for the Emerging Scholar Award, and affirming that the author meets these criteria.

2015-16 David Almond Fellowships Call for Applications

DAVID ALMOND FELLOWSHIPS FOR RESEARCH IN CHILDREN’S LITERATURE 2015-16

Newcastle University’s School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics and Seven Stories, National Centre for Children’s Books are pleased to announce that the application process for 2015-6 David Almond Fellowships is now open.

Further particulars
The awards recognise both David Almond’s contribution to children’s literature and his connections with these partner institutions: he is a patron of Seven Stories and an honorary graduate of Newcastle University.

The Fellowships aim to promote high-quality research in the Seven Stories collections that will call attention to their breadth and scholarly potential. The three awards of £300 each are to facilitate a research visit to the Seven Stories collections in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK of at least three days by a bona fide researcher working on a relevant project. Applications will be considered from candidates in any academic discipline. The successful applicants will have a clearly defined project that will benefit from having access to the Seven Stories collections (please see indicative information about the collections below). All applicants should consult the Seven Stories catalogue as part of preparing their applications: http://www.sevenstories.org.uk/collection/. A well-developed dissemination strategy will be an advantage. Priority will be given to the importance of the project and best use of the Seven Stories collections as judged by a senior member of the Children’s Literature Unit in the School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics at Newcastle University and a senior member of the Collections team at Seven Stories.

Eligibility for the award
Applicants must hold a first degree or higher from a recognised institution of higher education. Note: non-EEA applicants are reminded that to take up a Fellowship they must hold an appropriate visa. Neither Newcastle University nor Seven Stories can help with this process. Please see the UK visas website for more information: http://www.ukvisas.gov.uk/en/howtoapply

Responsibilities
Fellowships must be taken up before the end of April 2016. Recipients are expected to spend at least three days in Newcastle and are encouraged to time their visits to enable them to participate in events organised jointly or separately by the Children’s Literature Unit and Seven Stories. (Please note: successful applicants must contact Seven Stories and agree a date for the visit prior to making travel arrangements; normally a minimum of two weeks’ notice is required before any research visit.) Acknowledgement of the Fellowships must accompany all dissemination activities arising from the research.

The Seven Stories archives
Seven Stories is the only accredited museum in the UK to specialise in children’s books and holds the most substantial collection of British children’s literature archives anywhere in the world. The Collection is made up of over 140 individual archive collections and features original material by over 250 different practitioners: approximately 135 authors, 123 illustrators, 5 critics, 4 editors, and 2 playwrights. There is also material on some key publishers and editors and a substantial book collection, numbering around 40,000 volumes.

The individual author/illustrator holdings vary significantly in size and scope–from a single file through to complex archives documenting an entire career. Many of these holdings are virtually unexplored by scholars to date and provide significant potential for original research, whether by focussing in depth on the work of individual practitioners, or by making links across the individual collections to research a topic from many different angles. The Collection is still growing rapidly, with more and more connections made possible by each new acquisition.

To find out more, please explore the Collection pages of the Seven Stories website – http://www.sevenstories.org.uk/collection, where you will find links to the catalogue records, highlights pages, and blog, all of which may suggest avenues for research. All but the most recently acquired artwork and manuscript collections are fully catalogued. You are also strongly advised to contact with the Seven Stories Collection team when shaping your proposal. They can’t do your research for you, but they can advise on areas of the collection which particularly merit investigation, and steer you away from basing your proposal on holdings which lack sufficient depth to support it. They may also be able to provide information about more recently acquired material which is still being catalogued. To get in touch with the team please email collections@sevenstories.org.uk or call 0191 495 2707.

Application process
Applicants are asked to submit the following items by 1 November, 2015.

  • an application form
  • a curriculum vitae
  • a brief proposal (of 1,000 words maximum)
  • one confidential letter of recommendation (sealed and signed; confidential letters may be included in your application packet or recommenders may send them directly)

Applications may be submitted by email or post.

Email: Kim.Reynolds@ncl.ac.uk

Post:
David Almond Fellowships
School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics
Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU
UK

Jacqueline Wilson Scholarship – University of Roehampton

UNIVERSITY OF ROEHAMPTON
Department of English and Creative Writing

Postgraduate research studentships – Jacqueline Wilson Scholarship

The University of Roehampton is pleased to make its annual Jacqueline Wilson Scholarship open to a general call for research topics in the field of children’s literature. This will be awarded to a postgraduate PhD student working in the field of children’s literature or creative writing for children. The Jacqueline Wilson Scholar will be based in the award-winning National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature (NCRCL) with access to the Children’s Literature Collection and archives, and will join a lively community of researchers, writers and students. This fully funded scholarship will cover home/EU fees of £4052 for Home/EU students and maintenance of £16,057 p.a. in 2015/16 for 3 years full-time subject to satisfactory progress.

The scholarship is open to new students only and preference may be given to proposals that build on the research interests of the NCRCL. These include, but are not limited to: philosophy; theory; historical fiction; landscape; domestic spaces; memory; reading. Applicants are encouraged to identify potential supervisors as part of their application.

The Department of English and Creative Writing with over 600 students and 33 academic staff, has a growing international reputation for its research and teaching excellence. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), 80% of all our research publications were ranked as “world leading” or “internationally excellent” for their impact. The successful candidate will become part of an active and growing community of postgraduate scholars in a vibrant research culture, established external collaborations with London institutions and a very good track record of student success.

The Department is looking for candidates of the highest quality, capable of submitting a Ph.D. thesis within 3 years. Applicants should have completed an MA degree in a relevant subject, such as children’s literature, reading or memory, prior to the start of the studentship. Applicants should also be able to demonstrate strong research capabilities and fluency in spoken and written English that meets the university’s entrance criteria for doctoral study.

The University of Roehampton is set on a beautiful, traditional campus in south-west London. The University provides its students with exceptional facilities, high quality teaching and a close-knit, collegiate experience. It has a diverse student body and a cosmopolitan outlook, with students from over 130 countries.

Deadline for applications: 3 July 2015
Interviews will be held on 8 July 2015.

For further information or for informal discussion please contact Professor David Rudd: d.rudd@roehampton.ac.uk.

2014-15 David Almond Fellowships Call for Applications

DAVID ALMOND FELLOWSHIPS FOR RESEARCH IN CHILDREN’S LITERATURE 2014-5

Newcastle University’s School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics and Seven Stories, National Centre for Children’s Books are pleased to announce that the application process for 2014-5 David Almond Fellowships is now open.

Further particulars

The awards recognise both David Almond’s contribution to children’s literature and his connections with these partner institutions: he is a patron of Seven Stories and an honorary graduate of Newcastle University.

The Fellowships aim to promote high-quality research in the Seven Stories collections that will call attention to their breadth and scholarly potential. The two awards of £300 each are to facilitate a research visit to the Seven Stories collections in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK of at least three days by a bona fide researcher working on a relevant project. Applications will be considered from candidates in any academic discipline. The successful applicants will have a clearly defined project that will benefit from having access to the Seven Stories collections (please see indicative information about the collections below). All applicants should consult the Seven Stories catalogue as part of preparing their applications: http://www.sevenstories.org.uk/collection/. A well-developed dissemination strategy will be an advantage. Priority will be given to the importance of the project and best use of the Seven Stories collections as judged by a senior member of the Children’s Literature Unit in the School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics at Newcastle University and a senior member of the Collections team at Seven Stories.

Eligibility for the award

Applicants must hold a first degree or higher from a recognised institution of higher education.

Note: non-EEA applicants are reminded that to take up a Fellowship they must hold an appropriate visa. Neither Newcastle University nor Seven Stories can help with this process. Please see the UK visas website for more information: http://www.ukvisas.gov.uk/en/howtoapply

Responsibilities

Fellowships must be taken up before the end of April 2015. Recipients are expected to spend at least three days in Newcastle and are encouraged to time their visits to enable them to participate in events organised jointly or separately by the Children’s Literature Unit and Seven Stories. (Please note: successful applicants must contact Seven Stories and agree a date for the visit prior to making travel arrangements; normally a minimum of two weeks’ notice is required before any research visit.) Acknowledgement of the Fellowships must accompany all dissemination activities arising from the research.

The Seven Stories archives

Seven Stories is the only accredited museum specialising in children’s books in the UK. Its collections an support original research, particularly in documenting aspects of the creation, publication and reception of books for children from the 1930s to the present day. The steadily growing archive contains material from over 100 authors, illustrators, editors, and others involved in the children’s publishing industry in Britain.

The following are a few examples of particularly substantial collections and their research potential:

The Ursula Moray Williams archive spans the career of a prolific and highly regarded children’s author and documents her working relationships with illustrators and editors. Her collection offers a valuable opportunity for research into all aspects of the process of writing, editing and publishing books for children in the mid- to late-twentieth century.

The Leila Berg archive covers the broad and varied career of a writer and journalist who championed children’s rights and comprehensive education. Material relating to Berg’s published works for children offers a unique opportunity to study the creative output of one of the foremost proponents of realism in British children’s literature. In addition, Berg’s correspondence, articles, and notes are a hugely valuable resource for anyone interested in the study of children’s welfare and education in twentieth-century Britain.

The Geoffrey Trease archive comprises a substantial wealth of material charting the creative output of one of Britain’s most important children’s writers. The collection includes research material, notes and drafts relating to a significant number of Trease’s works for children. Material documenting Trease’s early career, as well as a selection of lectures and articles by Trease, gives a valuable account of the writer as a proponent of a more progressive and realist children’s literature.

The David Wood archive is currently the largest collection in terms of scale; it provides a broad and comprehensive reflection of the work of Britain’s foremost children’s playwright. The collection includes material relating to the vast majority of Wood’s plays and books, as well as notes, drafts, and correspondence relating to the production and publication of plays and books for children. It offers a highly unique opportunity for research into all aspects of children’s theatre and performing arts.

The Peter Dickinson archive is a broad and valuable record of the creative process of a prize-winning and highly renowned children’s author. In particular, the material documents in some detail the working relationship between author and editor. As Dickinson was successful in both Britain and America, the collection also provides a great deal of information on the publication of children’s books in both countries.

The Diana Wynne Jones archive contains a diversity of material documenting the life and career of one of Britain’s most highly regarded fantasy writers. The collection includes papers from Jones’ childhood, draft material for the majority of her works, personal and professional correspondence, and various other papers. It offers a unique opportunity for research into the children’s book industry and the creative formation of a writer.

More information can be found on the Collection pages of the Seven Stories website – http://www.sevenstories.org.uk/collection. All of the artwork and manuscript collections are fully catalogued, and the catalogues can be searched online via the link provided on the website. A list of many of the authors and illustrators represented in the collection can be found at: http://www.sevenstories.org.uk/collection/authors-and-illustrators

(Please bear in mind that this is not a complete list of the collections.)

Application process

Applicants are asked to submit the following items by 1 August, 2014.

  • an application form
  • a curriculum vitae
  • a brief proposal (of 1,000 words maximum)
  • one confidential letter of recommendation (sealed and signed; confidential letters may be included in your application packet or recommenders may send them directly)

Applications may be submitted by email or post.

Email: Kim.Reynolds@ncl.ac.uk

Post:David Almond Fellowships
School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics, Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, United Kingdom

Call for 2013 David Almond Fellowships in Children’s Literature

DAVID ALMOND FELLOWSHIPS FOR RESEARCH IN CHILDREN’S LITERATURE 2013

Newcastle University’s School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics and Seven Stories, National Centre for Children’s Books are pleased to announce that the application process for 2013 David Almond Fellowships is now open.

Further particulars

The awards recognise both David Almond’s contribution to children’s literature and his connections with these partner institutions: he is a patron of Seven Stories and an honorary graduate of Newcastle University.

The Fellowships aim to promote high-quality research in the Seven Stories collections that will call attention to their breadth and scholarly potential. The two awards of £300 each are to facilitate a research visit to the Seven Stories collections in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK of at least three days by a bona fide researcher working on a relevant project. Applications will be considered from candidates in any academic discipline. The successful applicants will have a clearly defined project that will benefit from having access to the Seven Stories collections. All applicants should consult the Seven Stories catalogue as part of preparing their applications: http://www.sevenstories.org.uk/collection/. A well-developed dissemination strategy will be an advantage. Priority will be given to the importance of the project and best use of the Seven Stories collections as judged by a senior member of the Children’s Literature Unit in the School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics at Newcastle University and a senior member of the Collections team at Seven Stories.

Eligibility and applications

Applications are being accepted until 1 February, 2013. For more details on eligibility and how to apply, please see the attached, or go to http://www.ncl.ac.uk/elll/about/childrensliterature/dafellowships.htm.

Call for Proposals: Frances E. Russell Grant

IBBY Canada Logo

IBBY Canada Call for Proposals: Frances E. Russell Grant

The Canadian National Section of the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY Canada) is now accepting proposals for the 2012 Frances E. Russell Grant. The $1,000 grant is intended to support IBBY Canada’s mission “to initiate and encourage research in young people’s literature in all its forms” and is given in support of research for a publishable work (a book or a paper) on Canadian children’s literature.

The deadline for proposals, which may be submitted in English or in French, is October 31, 2012.

The grant supports scholarly work only; works of fiction are not eligible. The types of works that are eligible for the 2012 Frances E. Russell Grant include:

  1. Studies of individual authors and their work, especially if considered in their socio-historical context.
  2. Comparative studies of two or more authors, which illuminate their stylistic differences, or consider their social and historical approaches.
  3. Subject/Genre overviews, for example, children’s fantasy or historical fiction.
  4. Biographical studies of Canadian children’s authors or illustrators.
  5. Studies of Canadian children’s illustrators and their work.
  6. Related subjects including contemporary theoretical approaches to the study of Canadian children’s literature.

The following materials are required: a proposal, a curriculum vitae, a synopsis of methods and stages by which the applicant will pursue the research, and a summary of what the funds are to be used for. The competition is open to Canadian citizens or landed immigrants. Please send proposals as e-mail attachments to: Deirdre Baker, Frances E. Russell Grant Chair, at russell@ibby-canada.org.

If candidates prefer not to use e-mail, proposals can be mailed to:

IBBY Canada
c/o The Canadian Children’s Book Centre
Suite 217, 40 Orchard View Blvd.
Toronto, ON M4R 1B9
Attention: Deirdre Baker, Frances E. Russell Grant Chair

A jury, appointed by IBBY Canada, will select the successful applicant by December 31, 2012.

ABOUT IBBY AND THE FRANCES E. RUSSELL GRANT

The Frances E. Russell Grant was established by the late Marjorie Russell in memory of her sister, a long time supporter of IBBY Canada. Past winners include Vivian Howard, Gail Edwards and Judith Saltman, Michelle Mulder, André Gagnon, Ronald Jobe, Carole Carpenter, Linda Granfield, and Françoise Lepage. For more information about the Frances E. Russell Grant, please visit the IBBY Canada web site at www.ibby-canada.org or write to info@ibby-canada.org.

Call for Applications – 2012 David Almond Fellowships for Research in Children’s Literature

Newcastle University’s School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics and Seven Stories, the national centre for children’s books proudly announce the creation of David Almond Fellowships. The awards recognise both David Almond’s contribution to children’s literature and his connections with these partner institutions: he is a patron of Seven Stories and an honorary graduate of Newcastle University.

Further particulars

The Fellowships aim to promote high-quality research in the Seven Stories collections that will call attention to their breadth and scholarly potential. The two awards of £300 each are to facilitate a research visit to the Seven Stories collections in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK of at least three days by a bona fide researcher working on a relevant project. Applications will be considered from candidates in any academic discipline. The successful applicants will have a clearly defined project that will benefit from having access to the Seven Stories collections. All applicants should consult the Seven Stories catalogue as part of preparing their applications: http://www.sevenstories.org.uk/collection/. A well-developed dissemination strategy will be an advantage. Priority will be given to the importance of the project and best use of the Seven Stories collections as judged by a senior member of the Children’s Literature Unit in the School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics at Newcastle University and a senior member of the Collections team at Seven Stories.

Eligibility for the award

Applicants must hold a first degree or higher from a recognised institution of higher education. Note: non-EEA applicants are reminded that to take up a Fellowship they must hold an appropriate visa. Neither Newcastle University nor Seven Stories can help with this process. Please see the UK visas website for more information: http://www.ukvisas.gov.uk/en/howtoapply

Responsibilities

Fellowships must be taken up before the end of December 2012. Recipients are expected to spend at least three days in Newcastle and are encouraged to time their visits to enable them to participate in events organised jointly or separately by the Children’s Literature Unit and Seven Stories. (Please note: successful applicants must contact Seven Stories and agree a date for the visit prior to making travel arrangements; normally a minimum of two weeks notice is required before any research visit.) Acknowledgement of the Fellowships must accompany all dissemination activities arising from the research.

Application process

Applicants are asked to submit the following items by 1 June, 2012

  • an application form
  • a curriculum vitae
  • a brief proposal (of 1,000 words maximum)
  • one confidential letter of recommendation (sealed and signed; confidential letters may be included in your application packet or recommenders may send them directly)

Applications may be submitted by email or post.

Email: Kim.Reynolds@ncl.ac.uk

Post: David Almond Fellowships
School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics
Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU
UK

Call for Proposals: 2011 Frances E. Russell Grant

IBBY Canada Logo

The Canadian National Section of the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY Canada) is now accepting proposals for the 2011 Frances E. Russell Grant. The $1,000 grant is intended to support IBBY Canada’s mission “to initiate and encourage research in young people’s literature in all its forms” and is given in support of research for a publishable work (a book or a paper) on Canadian children’s literature.

The deadline for proposals, which may be submitted in English or in French, is May 1, 2011. The grant supports scholarly work only; works of fiction are not eligible. The types of works that are eligible for the 2011 Frances E. Russell Grant include:

  1. Studies of individual authors and their work, especially if considered in their socio-historical context.
  2. Comparative studies of two or more authors, which illuminate their stylistic differences, or consider their social and historical approaches.
  3. Subject/Genre overviews, for example, Canadian fantasy or historical fiction.
  4. Biographical studies of Canadian children’s authors or illustrators.
  5. Studies of Canadian children’s illustrators and their work.
  6. Related subjects including contemporary theoretical approaches to the study of Canadian children’s literature.
  7. Research for children’s fiction or non-fiction based on Canadian topics or subjects.

Three copies of the following materials are required: a proposal, a curriculum vitae, a synopsis of methods and stages by which the applicant will pursue the research, and a summary of what the funds are to be used for. The competition is open to Canadian citizens or landed immigrants. Please send proposals to:

IBBY Canada c/o The Canadian Children’s Book Centre
Suite 101, 40 Orchard View Blvd.
Toronto, ON M4R 1B9

Attention: Deirdre Baker, Frances E. Russell Grant Chair

A jury, appointed by IBBY Canada, will select the successful applicant by June 1, 2011.

ABOUT IBBY AND THE FRANCES E. RUSSELL GRANT

The Frances E. Russell Grant was established by the late Marjorie Russell in memory of her sister, a long time supporter of IBBY Canada. Past winners include Vivian Howard, Gail Edwards and Judith Saltman, Michelle Mulder, Andre Gagnon, Ronald Jobe, Carole Carpenter, Linda Granfield, and Francoise Lepage. For more information about the Frances E. Russell Grant, please visit the IBBY Canada web site at www.ibby-canada.org or write to info@ibby-canada.org.

The International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY) believes in the ability of children’s books to bridge cultures and, ultimately, to promote peace. Jella Lepman, founder of the International Youth Library, started IBBY in 1953 in postwar Germany. Her goal was to promote international understanding through children’s books. Established in 1980, IBBY Canada is one of more than seventy sections worldwide.

ChLA Research Grant Opportunities

Children's Literature Association Logo

Each year the Children’s Literature Association provides grants in two categories–Faculty Research and Graduate Student Research. These are competitive grants that vary in award amount from $500 to $1500, based on the number and needs of the winning applicants. Up to $5,000 is available to be awarded in each category.

Further details about criteria and application procedure for the ChLA Faculty Research Grants can be found at http://www.childlitassn.org/faculty_grant.html.

Further details about criteria and application procedure for the Hannah Beiter Graduate Student Research Grants can be found at http://www.childlitassn.org/beiter_grant.html.

Applications will be accepted from now through February 1, 2011. Any questions about eligibility of projects or other matters relating to the grants should be directed to the Grants Committee Chair, Susan Stan, at stan1sm@cmich.edu or to the ChLA Administrator, Kathy Kiessling, at kkiessling@childlitassn.org.

Call For Submissions to the 2010 Frances E. Russell Grant

The Canadian National Section of the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY Canada) is now accepting submissions to the 2010 Frances E. Russell Grant.

The Frances E. Russell Grant was established by the late Marjorie Russell in memory of her sister, a longtime supporter of IBBY Canada. The $1,000 grant is intended to support IBBY Canada’s mission “to initiate and encourage research in young people’s literature in all its forms” and is given in support of research for a publishable work (a book or a paper) on Canadian children’s literature. Past winners include Gail Edwards, Judith Saltman, Michelle Mulder, Michelle Cobban, André Gagnon, Ronald A. Jobe, Carole H. Carpenter, Sydell Waxman, Françoise Lepage, Lynn Westerhout and Krista V. Johansen.

The deadline for proposals, which may be submitted in English or in French, is May 1, 2010. Eligible works include:

  1. Studies of individual authors and their work, especially if they are considered in their socio-historical context.
  2. Comparative studies of two or more authors, which illuminate their stylistic differences, or consider their social and historical approaches.
  3. Subject/Genre overviews, for example, Canadian fantasy or historical fiction.
  4. Biographical studies of Canadian children’s authors or illustrators.
  5. Studies of Canadian illustrators and their work.
  6. Related subjects including contemporary theoretical approaches to the study of Canadian children’s literature.
  7. Research for children’s fiction or non-fiction based on Canadian topics or subjects.

Three copies of each proposal, which should include a project synopsis and curriculum vitae, are required. The competition is open to Canadian citizens or landed immigrants. A jury, appointed by IBBY Canada, will select the successful applicant.

Send proposals to:

Attention: Deirdre Baker, Frances E. Russell Grant Chair
IBBY Canada c/o The Canadian Children’s Book Centre
Suite 101, 40 Orchard View Blvd., Toronto, ON M4R 1B9

The winner of the 2008-9 Frances E. Russell Grant will be announced in April 2010.

The International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY) believes in the ability of children’s books to bridge cultures and, ultimately, to promote peace. Jella Lepman, founder of the International Youth Library, started IBBY in 1953 in postwar Germany. Her goal was to promote international understanding through children’s books. Established in 1980, IBBY Canada is one of more than seventy sections worldwide.

For more information about IBBY and the Frances E. Russell Grant, please visit the IBBY Canada web site at www.ibby-canada.org or write to info@ibby-canada.org.