CFP – Ethical Practice in Participatory Visual Research with Girls and Young Women: A Focus on Rurality, Indigeneity, and Transnationality

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Call for Chapters
Ethical Practice in Participatory Visual Research with Girls and Young Women: A Focus on Rurality, Indigeneity, and Transnationality

Girls and young women, particularly those from rural and Indigenous communities, face some of the most adverse social issues in the world. They carry the greatest burden of disease, including the highest rates of HIV infection, and continue to suffer from gender discrimination and gender-based violence. This is despite the existence of relevant protective laws and international treaties. Thus, research that can inform the development of ways to better understand and address these issues is needed. Internationally, there is agreement that this must involve working directly with girls and young women as both knowers and actors in their own lives. Participatory Visual Methods (PVM), including digital storytelling, photo voice, drawing, and cellphilms, etc., have been used in such work in a variety of contexts. However, it is not always clear how best to do this work safely and ethically, especially in contexts of inequality, including gender inequality. Indeed, the very circumstances that need to be researched and addressed, tend to render girls and young women disproportionately vulnerable to harm and coercion.

Thus, as with other vulnerable populations, Institutional Ethics Boards (IEB) require additional protection measures to be in place when working with them. However, the key principles of participatory research are sometimes at odds with formal ethics processes, and many researchers often see them as barriers to working with girls and young women, and tend to avoid this work.

This edited book will present transnational contributions from PVM researchers whose work involves girls and young women in understanding and addressing gender-based violence in rural and Indigenous communities in various contexts. The contributions will analyse everyday ethical dilemmas visual researchers face and the strategies they implement to address them. The book will be co-edited by Relebohile Moletsane, Lisa Wiebesiek, Astrid Treffry-Goatley and April Mandrona.

Contributions in the form of chapters are invited that address one of the following broad areas:

  • Theoretical underpinnings of participatory visual research with girls and young women in contexts of gender inequality
  • Ethical considerations in Participatory Visual Research with girls and young women
  • Case Studies using Participatory Visual Methods with girls and young women in transnational and indigenous contexts

Please direct expressions of interest and manuscripts to:
Dr. Relebohile Moletsane: moletsaner@ukzn.ac.za; copy Lisa Wiebesiek: wiebesiekl@ukzn.ac.za
ABSTRACTS DUE (250 words): May 31, 2018
FULL MANUSCRIPTS DUE (7000 words inclusive): June 30, 2018