Panel Discussion on Solidarity Rock

Solidarity Rock Panel

UWinnipeg’s Oral History Centre in the Faculty of Arts invites all to attend a panel discussion (with videos) on the history of the DIY punk-rock movement in Cuba and the story of Solidarity Rock, its cultural and unifying impact and message. The panel discussion will be led by members of Trinidad, Cuba punk band Arrabio and Solidarity Rock representatives William Garcia and Drew McIntosh.

The event will take place on Thursday, October 25 from 4:00 – 5:30 p.m. in Room 2B23, Bryce Hall on the UWinnipeg campus. Coffee and light refreshments will be provided.

Since 2008, Solidarity Rock — an artist-run organization working with musicians, artists and creative people in Cuba, Canada and beyond — has been working to collect instruments and musical equipment to help the Cuban rock bands find their own way through music. This cross cultural group has managed to overcome social, political and economic barriers in order to build a unifying musical movement across the globe.

Special Issue of Papers: Explorations into Children’s Literature on Children’s Literature Collections and Archives

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A special issue of Papers: Explorations into Children’s Literature on Children’s Literature Collections and Archives is out now.

This issue is available (free open access) at: http://www.paperschildlit.com/index.php/papers.

Table of Contents

  • The Osborne Collection of Early Children’s Books: Toronto Public Library’s Research Collection of Juvenile Material Leslie Anne McGrath
  • Twentieth century literary and publishing archives: UK research perspectives on children’s literature Charlotte Berry
  • Colonial Girls’ Literature and the Politics of Archives in the Digital Age Michelle J. Smith and Kristine Moruzi
  • Anthony Arrowroot and Nutty Nutella: Advertising in Children’s Literature Afsana Khan
  • The Historical-Cultural Value of the Juvenile Collection: The McLaren Collection at the University of Melbourne and its Girls’ Books Margaret Lowe
  • John Mystery and the Australian Book Trade Juliet O’Conor
  • Astrid Lindgren and the Archives Helene Ehriander
  • A Token to the Future: A Digital “Archive” of Early Australian Children’s Literature Kerry Mallan, Amy Cross, and Cherie Allan
  • Digital Archives and Cultural Memory: Discovering Lost Histories in Digitised Australian Children’s Literature 1851-1945 Michelle Dicinoski
  • The Lu Rees Archives of Australian Children’s Literature Belle Alderman
  • Collections of the Swiss Institute for Children’s and Youth Media and their Public Access Roger Meyer
  • Growing up Australian: The National Imaginary in School Readers Jane McGennisken
  • Books or Toys? A Traveller’s tale: researching early movable books for and by children in material and virtual collections Jacqueline Reid-Walsh

Gender in Fairy Tale Film and Cinematic Folklore Course

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The University of Winnipeg’s Department of Women and Gender Studies is offering an online course on Gender in Fairy Tale Film and Cinematic Folklore for the 2013 Winter Term.

Course Number: WGS-3005-761
Course Instructor: Dr. Jennifer Orme
Prerequisites: WGS-1232, WGS-2001, WGS-2002 or ENGL-2114 or permission of the instructor

Fairy tale film (movie or TV versions of international wonder tales) and cinematic folklore (representations of other traditional genres in film) express notions of gender that have multiple implications for their creators and audiences. Using feminist film theory, we explore filmed versions of traditional culture primarily for adults. Topics include postmodern and psychoanalytic perspectives; metamorphosis, enchantment, monstrosity, and abjection; transgender and transbiology; the rise in popularity of adult fairy tale film; analyses of particular auteurs; adaptation theory; genre and generational shifts and remixes; historic and contemporary perspectives on innovative cinematography and special effects, and/or contemporary iconography.

This course features guest lectures by Jack Zipes, Cristina Bacchilega and Sidney Eve Matrix.

For further information or permission to take the course, please contact Dr. Greenhill at p.greenhill@uwinnipeg.ca or 786-9439.

ARCYP Call for Papers – Genderqueer Children and Youth

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CALL FOR PAPERS
Genderqueer Children and Youth
A JOINT SESSION OF ARCYP AND ACCUTE AT THE CONGRESS OF THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA, VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA
JUNE 1-8, 2013
DEADLINE: November 1, 2012

Elizabeth J. Meyer defines “genderqueer” as a term that challenges “the existing binaries of how we conceptualize and embody gender. . . . Genderqueer is an identity that has been embraced by individuals who feel that their gender identity does not fit clearly in the man/woman binary.” The Gender Equity Resource Center defines “genderqueer” as “a person who redefines or plays with gender, or who refuses gender altogether. A label for people who bend/break the rules of gender and blur the boundaries.”

For many genderqueer people their feelings of “gender dysphoria” can be traced to their earliest childhoods. Often children’s intuition of the disjunction between their bodies and their sense of their gendered selves is their very first memory (see Deborah Rudacille). Thinking about expressions and embodiments of gendered identities, it is clear that young people are of central concern to researchers and scholars.

We therefore invite papers about children and youth who are “queering gender” and about representations of and by those young people–including, but not limited to, “genderqueer,” “gender non-conforming,” “transgender,” “gender-gifted,” “polygender,” “genderless,” “gender-bending,” and “gender-blending” children and youth. Given that the lived experiences and mediated encounters of genderqueer young people are such a productive space of inquiry, we are interested in all research at the intersections of gender, identity, and childhood, and we encourage proposals from a wide range of academic disciplines.

Following the instructions under Option # 1 at www.accute.ca/generalcall.html, send your 700-word proposal (or 8-10 page double-spaced paper), a Proposal Submissions Information Sheet, and a 100-word abstract and 50-word bio-bibliographical statement, as three attachments to an email addressed to admin@arcyp.ca by November 1, 2012.

NOTES: You must be a current member of ARCYP or ACCUTE to submit to this session. Rejected submissions will not be moved into the general “pool” of ACCUTE submissions.

ARCYP Call for Papers – Institutionalized Spaces, Geographies, and Environments of Young People

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CALL FOR PAPERS
Institutionalized Spaces, Geographies, and Environments of Young People
A JOINT SESSION OF ARCYP AND ACCUTE AT THE CONGRESS OF THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA, VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA
JUNE 1-8, 2013
DEADLINE: November 1, 2012

This panel invites papers that explore spatial conceptualizations, experiences, and socio-cultural/political histories of young people within and in relation to institutionalized or publically funded/constructed physical or material spaces and environments that have been intentionally designed for young people. Research foci may include (but are not limited to): children’s museums and theatres; public libraries; children’s hospitals and rehabilitation centres, juvenile detention centres, and residential schools; public schools (and the spatial analysis thereof) summer camps, playgrounds and play spaces, and skate parks; and, other institutionalized physical/material spaces and environments allotted to young people.

Possible topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • The politics of private/public discourses of childhood relevant to these spaces;
  • Spatial experiences that result from criminal justice and legal policies around young people;
  • Socio-cultural histories of select institutionalized spaces (i.e. children’s hospitals etc.);
  • Relationships between national/civic/public identities and the allotment of spaces intended for young people in public environments.

We would especially encourage proposals that specifically explore spatially oriented analyses of the institutional contexts foregrounded in this CFP, and strongly encourage work that examines topics from social science perspectives and/or cross-disciplinary work rooted in geography, history, law, criminal justice, indigenous studies and sociology.

Following the instructions under Option # 1 at www.accute.ca/generalcall.html, send your 700-word proposal (or 8-10 page double spaced paper), a Proposal Submissions Information Sheet, and a 100-word abstract and 50-word biographical statement, as three attachments in an email addressed to admin@arcyp.ca by November 1 2012.

NOTES: You must be a current member of ARCYP or ACCUTE to submit to this session. Rejected submissions will not be moved into the general “pool” of ACCUTE submissions.

ARCYP Call for Papers – “Growing up Global”: Childhoods in a Transnational Context

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CALL FOR PAPERS
“Growing Up Global”: Childhoods in a Transnational Context
A JOINT SESSION OF ARCYP AND ACCUTE AT THE CONGRESS OF THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA, VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA
JUNE 1-8, 2013
DEADLINE: November 1, 2012

As people and institutions connect across the borders of nation-states, children are invariably part of the processes of transnationalism. Yet their presence has largely been ignored by much of the scholarship on transnationalism. While they may lack the abilities to fully articulate and engage with the social, political, and economic forces behind transnational movement and circulation, young people are just as affected by – and central to – these global currents. Thinking about childhood in a transnational context requires a greater awareness of how contemporary global culture is creating a unique experience of childhood itself, both of childhood, and for children themselves.

The purpose of this panel is to put children and childhood at the center of discussions concerning transnationalism. We seek papers that investigate the ways in which “the child” both impacts and is impacted by circulation across global borders. We encourage research that questions how children experience transnationality and how we understand the child and childhood in the context of nation states whose borders are not what they once were.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • researching children and childhoods in transnational contexts
  • the experiences of children in the transnational context
  • the relationships between global capital and the transnational child
  • securitization and the transnational child
  • children in transnational families
  • cosmopolitanism and the transnational child
  • transnational migration and the child

Following the instructions under Option # 1 at www.accute.ca/generalcall.html, send your 700-word proposal (or 8-10 page double spaced paper), a Proposal Submissions Information Sheet, and a 100-word abstract and 50-word biographical statement, as three attachments in an email addressed to admin@arcyp.ca by November 1 2012.

NOTES: You must be a current member of ARCYP or ACCUTE to submit to this session. Rejected submissions will not be moved into the general “pool” of ACCUTE submissions.

Joel Bakan Talk – Childhood Under Siege: How Big Business Targets Children

The Uniter Speaker Series presents Joel Bakan, author, filmmaker, and professor of law at UBC, on September 19 at 7:30PM in Eckhardt-Gramatté Hall. Admission is free.

Joel Bakan, author of the international bestseller The Corporation, and writer of the hit documentary film based upon it, will talk about his new book Childhood Under Siege: How Big Business Targets Children.

Whether the industry is marketing to kids or digital gaming, pharmaceuticals or industrial chemicals, farm labour or K-12 education, a similar dynamic is at work, Bakan argues: children are being neglected, harmed and exploited by large corporations increasingly unrestrained in their pursuit of profit. Change is possible, Bakan suggests, and he offers concrete ideas about how to pursue it.

Presented by The Uniter, the official student newspaper of The University of Winnipeg, The Uniter Speakers Series is part of the newspaper’s ongoing efforts to enhance its contribution to community life on and off campus.

Call for Proposals: Frances E. Russell Grant

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IBBY Canada Call for Proposals: Frances E. Russell Grant

The Canadian National Section of the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY Canada) is now accepting proposals for the 2012 Frances E. Russell Grant. The $1,000 grant is intended to support IBBY Canada’s mission “to initiate and encourage research in young people’s literature in all its forms” and is given in support of research for a publishable work (a book or a paper) on Canadian children’s literature.

The deadline for proposals, which may be submitted in English or in French, is October 31, 2012.

The grant supports scholarly work only; works of fiction are not eligible. The types of works that are eligible for the 2012 Frances E. Russell Grant include:

  1. Studies of individual authors and their work, especially if considered in their socio-historical context.
  2. Comparative studies of two or more authors, which illuminate their stylistic differences, or consider their social and historical approaches.
  3. Subject/Genre overviews, for example, children’s fantasy or historical fiction.
  4. Biographical studies of Canadian children’s authors or illustrators.
  5. Studies of Canadian children’s illustrators and their work.
  6. Related subjects including contemporary theoretical approaches to the study of Canadian children’s literature.

The following materials are required: a proposal, a curriculum vitae, a synopsis of methods and stages by which the applicant will pursue the research, and a summary of what the funds are to be used for. The competition is open to Canadian citizens or landed immigrants. Please send proposals as e-mail attachments to: Deirdre Baker, Frances E. Russell Grant Chair, at russell@ibby-canada.org.

If candidates prefer not to use e-mail, proposals can be mailed to:

IBBY Canada
c/o The Canadian Children’s Book Centre
Suite 217, 40 Orchard View Blvd.
Toronto, ON M4R 1B9
Attention: Deirdre Baker, Frances E. Russell Grant Chair

A jury, appointed by IBBY Canada, will select the successful applicant by December 31, 2012.

ABOUT IBBY AND THE FRANCES E. RUSSELL GRANT

The Frances E. Russell Grant was established by the late Marjorie Russell in memory of her sister, a long time supporter of IBBY Canada. Past winners include Vivian Howard, Gail Edwards and Judith Saltman, Michelle Mulder, André Gagnon, Ronald Jobe, Carole Carpenter, Linda Granfield, and Françoise Lepage. For more information about the Frances E. Russell Grant, please visit the IBBY Canada web site at www.ibby-canada.org or write to info@ibby-canada.org.