Centre for Research in Young People's Texts and Cultures

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University of Winnipeg

The Centre for Research in Young People's Texts and Cultures (CRYTC) supports scholarly inquiry into literary, media, and other cultural texts for children and youth. Directed by Dr. Doris Wolf, with assistance from the Research Coordinator, Larissa Wodtke, the Centre provides a focus for research in the field at the University of Winnipeg, houses the journal Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures, facilitates the development and management of collaborative national and international research projects, hosts visiting speakers and researchers, and maintains links with other research centres in children's studies internationally... more



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Issue 6.1 (Special Issue on Consumption) of Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures is out now! See Jeunesse's website for more information about this issue, and about how to submit articles and how to subscribe.



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2014-15 David Almond Fellowships Call for Applications

June 11, 2014

Newcastle University’s School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics and Seven Stories, National Centre for Children’s Books are pleased to announce that the application process for 2014-5 David Almond Fellowships is now open.

Further particulars

The awards recognise both David Almond’s contribution to children’s literature and his connections with these partner institutions: he is a patron of Seven Stories and an honorary graduate of Newcastle University.

The Fellowships aim to promote high-quality research in the Seven Stories collections that will call attention to their breadth and scholarly potential. The two awards of £300 each are to facilitate a research visit to the Seven Stories collections in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK of at least three days by a bona fide researcher working on a relevant project. Applications will be considered from candidates in any academic discipline. The successful applicants will have a clearly defined project that will benefit from having access to the Seven Stories collections (please see indicative information about the collections below). All applicants should consult the Seven Stories catalogue as part of preparing their applications: http://www.sevenstories.org.uk/collection/. A well-developed dissemination strategy will be an advantage. Priority will be given to the importance of the project and best use of the Seven Stories collections as judged by a senior member of the Children’s Literature Unit in the School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics at Newcastle University and a senior member of the Collections team at Seven Stories.

To find out more, please click here.

CFP - Special Issue of Jeunesse on Mobility

June 9, 2014

Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures invites essay submissions for a special issue addressing mobility in relation to youth texts and culture(s). We welcome essays that consider registers of race, class, gender, and disability. Essays should be between 6,000 and 9,000 words in length and prepared for blind peer-review.

Mobility invites us to think about bodies, identities, and agency from diverse disciplinary and methodological perspectives. Im/mobility can be many things: geographic, physical, ideological, imaginative, temporal, social. What are some of the ways that we might analyze this amorphous—in fact, mobile—topic in light of young people, their texts, and their cultures?

Submissions are requested by: 30 June 2015.

To find out more, please click here.

Pīsim Finds Her Miskanow wins Award from Canadian Archaeological Association

May 1, 2014

We are happy to announce that Pīsim Finds Her Miskanow has won a 2014 Public Communications Award from the Canadian Archaeological Association (CAA).

The CAA Public Awards Committee noted that this visually stunning book involved a large collaborative effort, including First Nation community members, early childhood educators, archaeologists, anthropologists, linguists, and historians. They appreciated that it seeks to meld two visions and approaches to Cree culture-history through a work of creative fiction designed to bring the many facets of traditional Cree culture alive for Native and non-Native readers alike, both young and old. The committee found this book to represent an extremely unique and creatively engaging manner of presenting archaeological information to the public.

For more information on the Pīsim project, visit our Projects.

To find out more, please click here.

Girls, Texts, Cultures Available for Pre-Order

January 3, 2014

Girls, Texts, Cultures, a volume initiated by a symposium hosted by the Centre for Research in Young People’s Texts and Cultures, is now available for pre-order through Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

Girls, Texts, Cultures cover

Edited by Clare Bradford and Mavis Reimer, this book focuses on girls and girlhoods, texts for and about girls, and the cultural contexts that shape girls’ experience. It brings together scholars from girls’ studies and children’s literature, fields that have traditionally conducted their research separately, and the collaboration showcases the breadth and complexity of girl-related studies.

Contributors from disciplines such as sociology, literature, education, and gender studies combine these disciplinary approaches in novel ways with insights from international studies, postcolonial studies, game studies, and other fields. Several of the authors engage in activist and policy-development work around girls who experience poverty and marginalization. Each essay is concerned in one way or another with the politics of girlhood as they manifest in national and cultural contexts, in the everyday practices of girls, and in textual ideologies and agendas.

To find out more, please click here.
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